Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJenny Thompson
IN THE NEWS

Jenny Thompson

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
August 15, 1998 | From Associated Press
Jenny Thompson claimed her 20th individual national title Friday night, winning the 100-meter butterfly in the U.S. Swimming Championships at Fresno. Thompson is the 16th swimmer to win 20 national titles in a career. She won the 100 freestyle earlier this week. She was ahead of world record pace at the 50-meter mark, but finished well off the record of 57.93 with a time of 59.74.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 15, 2004 | Kelsie Smith, Times Staff Writer
For Jenny Thompson it was one more trip to the award stand, one more victory lap around the pool and one more chance at her own gold medal. But Thompson will tell you the individual gold that has eluded her for three Olympics won't be what drives her in the fourth. Besides, she knows that her winning time of 25.02 seconds in Wednesday night's 50-meter freestyle isn't going to be enough in Athens.
Advertisement
SPORTS
February 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Olympic candidates Summer Sanders, Jenny Thompson, Lea Loveless and Janel Jorgensen will lead No. 1-ranked Stanford into the Pacific 10 Swimming Championships, today through Sunday at Belmont Plaza pool in Long Beach. Preliminaries begin each day at 11 a.m., finals at 6.
SPORTS
July 9, 2004 | Bill Plaschke
From the top of the towering west stands at Long Beach's temporary aquatic complex, 72 steps high, you can see the earth swim. Brown sand becomes blue waves becomes endless horizon, all of it rocking in rhythm to an insistent wind. It was up here that swimming coach John Collins climbed early Thursday evening before the women's 100-meter butterfly final at the Olympic trials. He walked to the corner of the stands closest to the ocean. He yanked a gray knit cap from the back pocket of his jeans.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN
It may not have seemed that way four years ago, but swimming star Jenny Thompson actually has found a positive way to look at the 1996 Olympic Games. Thompson did not qualify for an individual race but won gold medals in three relays. She said she would have retired after Atlanta if she had won an individual gold. "It was a bit of a blessing in disguise because I've had the best four years that I've had in my career these last four years," Thompson said.
SPORTS
March 1, 1993 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA freshman Richelle Depold couldn't believe her eyes. She looked again and again at the scoreboard with the 22.58 next to Lane 5. "I thought it was (Jenny Thompson's) time," Depold said of Stanford's sophomore Olympic gold medalist. Not only did Depold's 22.58 Sunday night represent her career best in the 50-yard freestyle, it marked an upset over Thompson, America's best sprinter, in the Pacific 10 Conference women's swimming championships at Belmont Plaza Pool in Long Beach.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Quick, U.S. national team coach, introduced Misty Hyman the other day to lively Laurie Lawrence, the first and loudest cheerleader of Australian sport. If the name Laurie Lawrence doesn't resonate, maybe this image helps . . . Dick Vitale on a mega-dose of speed. The Lawrence legend became part of Olympic lore at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
February 25, 1994 | WENDY WITHERSPOON
The Stanford women's swim team won all five events on the first day of competition Thursday at the Pacific 10 Conference championships at the Belmont Plaza Olympic Pool in Long Beach. Even though the Cardinal is in first place with 431 points, 119 points ahead of second-place UCLA, and appears strong enough to win their eighth consecutive Pac-10 title, Coach Richard Quick said the championship could slip from their grasp at any moment.
SPORTS
August 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Jenny Thompson, the bionic woman of American swimming with a plate and seven screws holding her left arm together, scored her second victory Wednesday in the National Swimming Championships. Thompson won the 100-meter butterfly in 1 minute 0.34 seconds, catching runner-up Amy Van Dyken just before the finish with a final split of 32.04 seconds. Van Dyken was second in 1:00.57. "I was really nervous coming into this meet.
SPORTS
March 7, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jenny Thompson started the 1992 U.S. Olympic trials with a world record in the 100-meter freestyle and ended them Friday night with an American record in the 50 freestyle. The Stanford freshman broke the American record twice in the sprint, eclipsing Leigh Ann Fetter's 1991 mark of 25.50 seconds with a 25.44 in the preliminaries and 25.20 in the finals. "I knew Angel (Martino) and Leigh Ann had records in the past, and that I would have to swim at record time to make the team," Thompson said.
SPORTS
June 14, 2004 | Kelsie Smith, Times Staff Writer
At 31, Jenny Thompson is feeling nostalgic. In July, the 10-time Olympic medalist will compete for a trip to what would be the third and final Olympic Games of her career. "I'm really enjoying it and trying to soak it up as much as possible," she said Sunday after finishing third in the 100-meter butterfly at the Janet Evans Invitational in Long Beach. Thompson took a break from competitive swimming after the 2000 Olympics in Sydney and resumed her career in 2002.
SPORTS
July 21, 2003 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
She started singing even though the music never really got started, guided by her teammates in the stands. They began "The Star-Spangled Banner," a cappella, and Jenny Thompson brought it home, so to speak. Certainly, it could have been a metaphor for her career, and it was exactly that Sunday night at the World Swimming Championships. After the first three legs of the women's 400-meter relay, the United States was in third place, trailing Australia and Germany.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jazz metaphor for the perplexing career of Jenny Thompson sounded dead on, so accurate. Her longtime coach and mentor, Richard Quick, squinted at the reporter who was trying to explain the other day that, while Thompson might sound great in quartet, she couldn't cut it as a solo artist. Quick politely disagreed. Then again, you get the idea that the only music most swim coaches hear is the ticking of a stopwatch.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Quick, U.S. national team coach, introduced Misty Hyman the other day to lively Laurie Lawrence, the first and loudest cheerleader of Australian sport. If the name Laurie Lawrence doesn't resonate, maybe this image helps . . . Dick Vitale on a mega-dose of speed. The Lawrence legend became part of Olympic lore at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN
It may not have seemed that way four years ago, but swimming star Jenny Thompson actually has found a positive way to look at the 1996 Olympic Games. Thompson did not qualify for an individual race but won gold medals in three relays. She said she would have retired after Atlanta if she had won an individual gold. "It was a bit of a blessing in disguise because I've had the best four years that I've had in my career these last four years," Thompson said.
SPORTS
August 23, 2000 | SALLY JENKINS, THE WASHINGTON POST
I'm naked. I'm writing this with one hand, clutching a suggestively draped towel with the other, while crouched behind a soccer ball. I'm waiting for the schoolmarms and the soreheads and the Robespierres to haul me off to the Thought Police at any second. OK, so I'm not really naked. I just said that for effect.
SPORTS
March 2, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The quandary for Jenny Thompson and Nelson Diebel was that, though they electrified the Indiana University Natatorium crowd Sunday morning with respective world and American records, they still had not earned berths on the 1992 U.S. Olympic team. To their credit, Thompson and Diebel withstood the pressures of a six-hour wait between preliminaries and finals and repeated their winning efforts on the opening day of the Olympic trials.
SPORTS
July 15, 2000 | VALERIE GUTIERREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jenny Thompson said she doesn't feel the swimming community has forgotten about her. With her performance Friday night in the Janet Evans Invitational at USC, Thompson made sure it won't. Thompson, 27, who attended Stanford, won the 100-meter freestyle in 54.27 seconds and improved her eight-year-old American record by 0.21 seconds. "I think you'll see more good swims from me," Thompson said. "It makes me feel really confident and positive about the next four weeks.
SPORTS
August 15, 1998 | From Associated Press
Jenny Thompson claimed her 20th individual national title Friday night, winning the 100-meter butterfly in the U.S. Swimming Championships at Fresno. Thompson is the 16th swimmer to win 20 national titles in a career. She won the 100 freestyle earlier this week. She was ahead of world record pace at the 50-meter mark, but finished well off the record of 57.93 with a time of 59.74.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|