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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991
As Wilson vetoed AB 101, he avoided being fired by the right-wing extremist faction of the Republican Party. Yet as the result, potentially many more hard-working citizens of California will have no legal protection from being fired on the basis of sexual orientation. This selfish governor deserves to be fired by the voters of California on the next election. JASON LIN Santa Monica
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991
As Wilson vetoed AB 101, he avoided being fired by the right-wing extremist faction of the Republican Party. Yet as the result, potentially many more hard-working citizens of California will have no legal protection from being fired on the basis of sexual orientation. This selfish governor deserves to be fired by the voters of California on the next election. JASON LIN Santa Monica
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1999 | KINSEY LOWE
The western renaissance has largely been confined to TV, but a handful of projects are on their way to the big screen. This summer "The Wild Wild West" Barry Sonnenfeld directs Will Smith and Kevin Kline as super-duper secret agents in Warner Bros.' wild interpretation of the '60s TV series.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1990 | David Pecchia \f7
The Brotherhood (Stone Group Pics./Mace Neufeld). Shooting in New Orleans and Mississippi. Flamboyant footballer Brian Bosworth stars with character types William Forsythe and Lance Henriksen as an undercover cop who infiltrates an infamous motorcycle gang. Executive producers Walter Doniger and Gary Wichard. Producer Yoram Ben-Ami. Director Bruce Malmuth. Screenwriters Doniger and Howard Cushnir. Also stars Michelle Johnson. Distributor Tri-Star. Crooked Hearts (Crooked Heart Prod.).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From its opening moments, while the camera slowly pans down from the moon to two teen-age sisters on their porch, idly listening to Elvis' "Loving You," "The Man in the Moon" (opening Friday at the AMC Century 14) magically eases us into another world. It's rural Louisiana in the late '50s, repressed, rustic, but also full of youth and awakening sexuality. Everything here seems more heightened, sensual, more intensely observed.
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