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Jenoyne Adams

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NEWS
February 20, 2001 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the kicked-up dirt and brittle yellow grass, Michael Datcher sees a thriving garden. Standing in dusk's drizzle, just beyond the front door of the Windsor Hills home he shares with his wife, Jenoyne Adams, Datcher summons rose bushes and a plush-carpet of a lawn. Surrounding it, of course, the white picket fence he long ago commenced to build, plank-by-plank, in his mind. A poet, it's Datcher's business to dream a world in all its glory and despair, to acknowledge life's extremes.
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NEWS
February 20, 2001 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the kicked-up dirt and brittle yellow grass, Michael Datcher sees a thriving garden. Standing in dusk's drizzle, just beyond the front door of the Windsor Hills home he shares with his wife, Jenoyne Adams, Datcher summons rose bushes and a plush-carpet of a lawn. Surrounding it, of course, the white picket fence he long ago commenced to build, plank-by-plank, in his mind. A poet, it's Datcher's business to dream a world in all its glory and despair, to acknowledge life's extremes.
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NEWS
February 9, 1999
DISCUSSION "Cup of Culture: Michael Datcher and Jenoyne Adams" at Cal State L.A., 5151 State University Drive. (323) 343-5247. MEETING Amnesty International holds an informational meeting tonight at its Culver City office. (310) 815-0450. MUSEUMS George Stuart's "Abraham Lincoln" opens today. Carole and Barry Kaye Museum of Miniatures, L.A. (323) 937-6464. CLUBS Rasputina, a trio of corseted cellists, performs Wednesday. The Troubadour, Hollywood. (310) 276-6168. What are you looking at?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998
Area poets and artists will discuss the role of art as a weapon against oppression at an evening discussion tonight sponsored by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The museum's fall 1998 writer-in-residence Michael Datcher will lead the discussion, "Renaissances of Resistance: The Documentation of Black Humanity as a Weapon Against Oppression in Leimert Park and Harlem."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silence is seldom golden. Neither is Michael Datcher's long one-act play "Silence." Datcher's poetry, essays and a memoir have received acclaim. But his bio reflects no previous theatrical experience. "Silence," which he wrote and directed, played a single performance Friday in the Harold M. Williams Auditorium at the Getty Center.
BOOKS
September 23, 2001
TODAY BEVERLY HILLS: Writers Bloc presents Joan Didion ("Political Fictions," "Slouching Towards Bethlehem," "Play It As It Lays") in conversation with L.A. Times writer Patt Morrison ("Rio L. A."), $15, Temple Emanuel, 300 N. Clark Drive, 3 p.m. Reservations: (310) 335-0917. CENTURY CITY: Barbara Saltzman discusses her late son David Saltzman's "The Jester Has Lost His Jingle," Bloomingdale's, 10250 Santa Monica Blvd., 2 p.m. (310) 772-2114.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city simmered and seethed. Anger overflowed in neighborhood after neighborhood. But those who flocked to Leimert Park Village during the riots of 1992 found healers: poets, painters, musicians, dancers--artists whose art spoke more truth about people's lives than a burning building ever could. "It wasn't, 'I hate [white people] poetry,' " said poet and writer Michael Datcher. "It was young black men, writing love poems." And mothers writing about the difficulty of raising children.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From his perspective as a longtime editor for Playboy, Stephen Randall is surely an expert on the manners and morals of what he calls "Upper Los Angeles"--"That's Hollywood," explains one of the characters in Randall's first novel, "The Other Side of Mulholland" (St. Martin's Press/L.A. Weekly Books, $23.95, 256 pages), "and all the glitz and the big houses and beautiful women and the BMWs."
HOME & GARDEN
July 3, 2003 | Michael Datcher
When I ARRIVED IN LOS Angeles for grad school in 1992, I longed for a Bay Area vibe. Berkeley had spoiled me. Public debaters interrogating foreign policy, nonstudents reading thick books in Cafe Milano, the weekend drum circle, June Jordan, Jesus holding court. But UCLA's manicured campus lacked funk; I had to go out and find it. Restless, I would drive through neighborhoods all over the city, always in search.
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