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November 27, 1994 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer. He has viewed Worsaae productions in Salt Lake City, Copenhagen and San Francisco and throughout Southern California.
Nobody planned it that way, but the new $900,000 San Francisco Ballet "Romeo and Juliet" that opens Wednesday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion can be considered a monument to the late Danish designer Jens-Jacob Worsaae.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer. He has viewed Worsaae productions in Salt Lake City, Copenhagen and San Francisco and throughout Southern California.
Nobody planned it that way, but the new $900,000 San Francisco Ballet "Romeo and Juliet" that opens Wednesday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion can be considered a monument to the late Danish designer Jens-Jacob Worsaae.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1994
Casting has been announced for the new San Francisco Ballet production of "Romeo and Juliet" at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Wednesday through Dec. 4. Premiered in March, this full-evening version uses the familiar Prokofiev score, with choreography by company artistic director Helgi Tomasson and designs (sets and costumes) by Jens-Jacob Worsaae. Principal casting is as follows.: Wednesday, 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1988 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music/Dance Critic
Helgi Tomasson's lavish new production of "Swan Lake" at the War Memorial Opera House endures two basic liabilities. Jens-Jacob Worsaae's lovely, painterly decors, hazily lit by David K.H. Elliott, suggest the delicacy of 18th-Century France rather than the passion of 19th-Century Russia. More problematic, the principal dancers of the San Francisco Ballet do not seem to possess the larger-than-life personalities required to illuminate the central roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
San Francisco Ballet artistic director Helgi Tomasson unveiled his problematic Baroque production of "Swan Lake" in the city by the bay in April, reserving an American-born team of principals for last in a trio of casts. It was this pair, Evelyn Cisneros as Odette-Odile and Anthony Randazzo as Siegfried, who opened a three-day run of the ballet Thursday at the San Diego Civic Theatre and introduced some problems of their own. They will repeat these roles tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1990 | LEWIS SEGAL
After 100 years, it's about time someone got serious about "The Sleeping Beauty." San Francisco Ballet does exactly that, in a new $750,000 production that manages to be both novel and profound. To heighten the sense of Aurora sleeping for a century--a crucial plot point that most stagings blur--company director Helgi Tomasson and his designer, Jens-Jacob Worsaae, set the first half of the ballet in Russia before that country's enforced Westernization.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
"Romeo and Juliet" ballets are often created as milestones in a company's history, and no company has courted Shakespeare's star-cross'd lovers with more momentous results than San Francisco Ballet. In 1938, Willam Christensen choreographed the very first "Romeo" in America for the struggling young Bay Area ensemble. In 1976, the Michael Smuin version rescued SFB from imminent financial collapse by offering a popular statement of youthful vitality.
NEWS
October 9, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Proficiency without passion, the endless recycling of an atrophied heritage but no semblance of creative vision: These are the hallmarks of an art form on the ropes, and they're so much a part of the new San Francisco Ballet "Don Quixote" that you might consider the whole project a stopgap until the next big thing comes along.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
From a newly revealed Sistine Chapel ceiling to a painstakingly restored version of the film musical "A Star Is Born," cultural historians are reclaiming parts of our past that once seemed hopelessly lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC/DANCE CRITIC
"The Sleeping Beauty," as staged last season by Helgi Tomasson for the San Francisco Ballet, is stylish and stimulating. The $745,000 production may stretch company resources to the limit, but the stretch obviously invigorates all concerned. From lofty ballerina to lowly corps member, the dancers honor the exalted Petipa tradition. Most of Tomasson's choreographic additions and subtractions make good sense.
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