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FOOD
December 25, 2002 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Jeremiah Tower is back. Break out the Champagne and caviar (preferably vintage Krug from the mid-'50s and only osetra or sevruga -- but don't serve them together, the only thing to drink with caviar is iced vodka and it must be served on blini made with so much butter that the excess runs down your arm). Tower, one of the seminal chefs in the birth of modern California cooking, has always been a man of flamboyant but precise tastes.
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BOOKS
August 3, 2003 | Richard Flaste, Richard Flaste is The Times' features editor and a collaborator on several cookbooks with chef Pierre Franey.
At bottom, Jeremiah Tower's memoir is all about who gets the credit: Who gets our thanks for the revolution in American cuisine that took place in the '70s and '80s? One line of thinking holds that the movement began at Chez Panisse in Berkeley and radiated out so that California cooking soon became synonymous with a new type of American food experience.
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FOOD
July 23, 2003 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
For decades, Jeremiah Tower was the talk of this food-centric city. People talked in the '70s when he put Chez Panisse on the culinary map. They talked in the '80s when he opened Stars, the A-list restaurant, and showed up in Dewar's scotch ads and on "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous." They talked in the '90s when he hit the skids and ended up running a disco/restaurant in Manila. Now, in a memoir that has rocked the Bay Area even before its release next month, Tower is talking back.
FOOD
July 23, 2003 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
For decades, Jeremiah Tower was the talk of this food-centric city. People talked in the '70s when he put Chez Panisse on the culinary map. They talked in the '80s when he opened Stars, the A-list restaurant, and showed up in Dewar's scotch ads and on "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous." They talked in the '90s when he hit the skids and ended up running a disco/restaurant in Manila. Now, in a memoir that has rocked the Bay Area even before its release next month, Tower is talking back.
FOOD
December 21, 1986 | BETSY BALSLEY
Jeremiah Tower's New American Classics by Jeremiah Tower (Harper & Row: $25, 233 pp., illustrated). The gorgeous photography by Ed Carey might, at first perusal, make one think that Jeremiah Tower's new book is one of those cocktail table cookbooks meant for reading only. Not so. The book is truly a beauty and great fun to read . . . but you'll find you are reading it on your way to the kitchen . . . with dinner in mind. This enterprising young American chef's culinary artistry is well known to those who follow "trendy" chefs, but his entertaining prose may come as a surprise.
FOOD
November 5, 1987 | JOAN DRAKE
The Fifth Annual American Wine & Food Festival, benefiting the West Los Angeles Chapter of Meals on Wheels and Cuisine a Roulettes, will be held Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. This year's event will be held on the "Back to the Future" set at Universal Studios. Honorary benefit chairman is Vincent Price. Once again this year 15 chefs from around the country and 45 wineries will offer a tasting of their finest cuisine and wines.
FOOD
November 9, 1995
Leave it to John Rivera Sedlar, quirky chef of Abiquiu restaurant in Santa Monica, to put out a poster of beautiful tamales. This latest exercise in culinary, well, cheesecake from Ten-Speed Press doesn't show your basic chicken, pork or cheese choices but rather what can only be described as designer tamales. Who else but Sedlar would make a Jewish tamale of whitefish mousse, smoked salmon and baby bagels? Or a Tokyo tamale of ahi tuna marinated in ponzu , pickled ginger and wasabi?
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | Robert A. Jones
I had a friend once who claimed there was an unspoken social rule in California. That rule said that culture, whether high or low, did not commute from one end of the state to the other. For example, the San Francisco Opera had not and never would perform at the Hollywood Bowl. Likewise the Beach Boys never made it big at the Fillmore. This cultural law has especially applied to the culinary arts. Chefs of the North kept to the North, and vice versa. The restaurant kitchens of San Francisco and Los Angeles might be invaded by waves of Italians or Cajuns, but not by cooks from the other end of the state.
BOOKS
August 3, 2003 | Richard Flaste, Richard Flaste is The Times' features editor and a collaborator on several cookbooks with chef Pierre Franey.
At bottom, Jeremiah Tower's memoir is all about who gets the credit: Who gets our thanks for the revolution in American cuisine that took place in the '70s and '80s? One line of thinking holds that the movement began at Chez Panisse in Berkeley and radiated out so that California cooking soon became synonymous with a new type of American food experience.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
There was a long thread on Chowhound recently about great old television cooking shows (Justin Wilson, come on down!). There was lots of love for many of the obvious suspects - Julia, Jacques and James Beard - and some who might no longer be so obvious - Graham Kerr and Jeff “The Frugal Gourmet” Smith, among them. Then there were some TV cooks I'd largely forgotten about - Keith Floyd was a hoot but actually showed a lot of good food. There was my old buddy Nathalie Dupree, the doyenne of Southern cooking, and my first great teacher, the bristly but supremely educational Madeleine Kamman.
FOOD
December 25, 2002 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Jeremiah Tower is back. Break out the Champagne and caviar (preferably vintage Krug from the mid-'50s and only osetra or sevruga -- but don't serve them together, the only thing to drink with caviar is iced vodka and it must be served on blini made with so much butter that the excess runs down your arm). Tower, one of the seminal chefs in the birth of modern California cooking, has always been a man of flamboyant but precise tastes.
FOOD
November 9, 1995
Leave it to John Rivera Sedlar, quirky chef of Abiquiu restaurant in Santa Monica, to put out a poster of beautiful tamales. This latest exercise in culinary, well, cheesecake from Ten-Speed Press doesn't show your basic chicken, pork or cheese choices but rather what can only be described as designer tamales. Who else but Sedlar would make a Jewish tamale of whitefish mousse, smoked salmon and baby bagels? Or a Tokyo tamale of ahi tuna marinated in ponzu , pickled ginger and wasabi?
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | Robert A. Jones
I had a friend once who claimed there was an unspoken social rule in California. That rule said that culture, whether high or low, did not commute from one end of the state to the other. For example, the San Francisco Opera had not and never would perform at the Hollywood Bowl. Likewise the Beach Boys never made it big at the Fillmore. This cultural law has especially applied to the culinary arts. Chefs of the North kept to the North, and vice versa. The restaurant kitchens of San Francisco and Los Angeles might be invaded by waves of Italians or Cajuns, but not by cooks from the other end of the state.
FOOD
November 5, 1987 | JOAN DRAKE
The Fifth Annual American Wine & Food Festival, benefiting the West Los Angeles Chapter of Meals on Wheels and Cuisine a Roulettes, will be held Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. This year's event will be held on the "Back to the Future" set at Universal Studios. Honorary benefit chairman is Vincent Price. Once again this year 15 chefs from around the country and 45 wineries will offer a tasting of their finest cuisine and wines.
FOOD
December 21, 1986 | BETSY BALSLEY
Jeremiah Tower's New American Classics by Jeremiah Tower (Harper & Row: $25, 233 pp., illustrated). The gorgeous photography by Ed Carey might, at first perusal, make one think that Jeremiah Tower's new book is one of those cocktail table cookbooks meant for reading only. Not so. The book is truly a beauty and great fun to read . . . but you'll find you are reading it on your way to the kitchen . . . with dinner in mind. This enterprising young American chef's culinary artistry is well known to those who follow "trendy" chefs, but his entertaining prose may come as a surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1991 | LAURIE OCHOA
Like Cajun, Southwestern cooking is a good regional style that's been gimmicked up. The same trend-conscious restaurants that swore by blackened redfish became sudden converts to blue corn and ancho chiles when the Cajun phenomenon ran its course. Bad Southwestern restaurants resulted. Several have already closed. But two weeks ago, a brave new Southwestern restaurant opened for business in Beverly Hills.
FOOD
December 17, 1989 | BARBARA HANSEN
A collection of menus by such noted food personalities as Hubert Keller, Alice Waters, Laura Chenel, Rene Verdon and Jeremiah Tower could not fail to draw interest. What makes this book even more worthwhile is its charitable purpose. A portion of the proceeds will be turned over to Project Open Hand. Founded in San Franciso in 1985 by Ruth Brinker, this organization provides two meals daily to AIDS patients who are unable to market and cook. The menus are divided according to season and cover such diverse situations as an unintimidating dinner for friends, an eastern European dinner, an ambitious dinner for four and a simple southwestern dinner for a summer's eve. This is not a fancy book, but it offers plenty of substance.
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