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Jeremy Blake

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July 21, 2007 | Mike Boehm
Artist Jeremy Blake is missing, according to New York City investigators, and he apparently drowned himself Tuesday night, said Lance Kinz, co-owner of the Manhattan art gallery that represents Blake. Police said a man "tentatively identified" as Blake was seen stripping to his shorts and disappearing into the surf at Rockaway Beach in Queens, N.Y., where no body had been found by Friday. Kinz said Blake's friends are convinced it was him because his wallet and clothes were found in the sand.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2007
RE "Why'd They Do It?" by Chris Lee, July 25, and "In a Cocoon of Their Making," by Chris Lee, Aug. 3: The years that I spent working with Jeremy Blake, through my gallery, Works on Paper Inc., in Los Angeles, were productive and amazingly exciting. It was an experience that continues to positively influence an approach to my own curatorial practice. His video work, often referencing formal conventions of painting, was progressive and deeply intelligent.
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NEWS
November 14, 2002 | Jessica Hundley, Special to The Times
Jeremy Blake's digital art is painting made animate, color and pattern transformed from stagnant image into slow, liquid, meditative motion. Working initially with ink and gouache drawings (and at times sketching directly onto the computer), Blake manipulates his work into dreamlike DVD animations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
On the evening of July 10, rising art star Jeremy Blake returned to his New York apartment, a converted rectory at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery that he shared with his girlfriend, Theresa Duncan. The couple, extremely devoted and still very much in love after 12 years, had eaten a late lunch together, and Blake invited the church's assistant pastor over for a drink.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
On the evening of July 10, rising art star Jeremy Blake returned to his New York apartment, a converted rectory at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery that he shared with his girlfriend, Theresa Duncan. The couple, extremely devoted and still very much in love after 12 years, had eaten a late lunch together, and Blake invited the church's assistant pastor over for a drink.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2007
RE "Why'd They Do It?" by Chris Lee, July 25, and "In a Cocoon of Their Making," by Chris Lee, Aug. 3: The years that I spent working with Jeremy Blake, through my gallery, Works on Paper Inc., in Los Angeles, were productive and amazingly exciting. It was an experience that continues to positively influence an approach to my own curatorial practice. His video work, often referencing formal conventions of painting, was progressive and deeply intelligent.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A body found by a New Jersey fisherman last month was that of artist Jeremy Blake, the New York Police Department confirmed Tuesday. Police believe Blake, 35, committed suicide July 17 by drowning himself at Rockaway Beach in Queens. He disappeared a week after his girlfriend, filmmaker Theresa Duncan, 40, committed suicide in their East Village apartment. Blake, who worked as a graphic designer for a video game manufacturer, was considered a rising star in the modern art world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
It's been just eight days since rising art star Jeremy Blake was seen wandering into the ocean off New York's Rockaway Beach -- presumably to his death -- a week after he discovered that his blogger-filmmaker girlfriend, Theresa Duncan, had taken her life in their East Village apartment. But the apparent double suicide of this glamorous, intellectual couple has confounded and disturbed the art world in New York, London and Los Angeles, where they lived together for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
Police in New Jersey are enlisting the public's help in identifying a body presumed to be that of Jeremy Blake, a rising art star who was seen wandering into the ocean off New York's Rockaway Beach on July 17, after leaving behind his clothing, his wallet and a suicide note. His girlfriend of 12 years, blogger-filmmaker-writer Theresa Duncan, took her life in the couple's East Village apartment earlier this month. The body was discovered by a fisherman approximately 4 1/2 miles off Sea Girt, N.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2007
"THEY were brilliant, complex people," says Katie Brennan of Theresa Duncan and Jeremy Blake ["Why'd They Do It?" by Chris Lee, July 25]. It's now apparent that these two lost souls were too "complex" for their own good. This sad story is just another example of the old saying regarding money and happiness. For all their complexity, talent, money and social standing in the art community, Blake and Duncan had some serious psychological problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A body found by a New Jersey fisherman last month was that of artist Jeremy Blake, the New York Police Department confirmed Tuesday. Police believe Blake, 35, committed suicide July 17 by drowning himself at Rockaway Beach in Queens. He disappeared a week after his girlfriend, filmmaker Theresa Duncan, 40, committed suicide in their East Village apartment. Blake, who worked as a graphic designer for a video game manufacturer, was considered a rising star in the modern art world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
Police in New Jersey are enlisting the public's help in identifying a body presumed to be that of Jeremy Blake, a rising art star who was seen wandering into the ocean off New York's Rockaway Beach on July 17, after leaving behind his clothing, his wallet and a suicide note. His girlfriend of 12 years, blogger-filmmaker-writer Theresa Duncan, took her life in the couple's East Village apartment earlier this month. The body was discovered by a fisherman approximately 4 1/2 miles off Sea Girt, N.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
It's been just eight days since rising art star Jeremy Blake was seen wandering into the ocean off New York's Rockaway Beach -- presumably to his death -- a week after he discovered that his blogger-filmmaker girlfriend, Theresa Duncan, had taken her life in their East Village apartment. But the apparent double suicide of this glamorous, intellectual couple has confounded and disturbed the art world in New York, London and Los Angeles, where they lived together for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | Mike Boehm
Artist Jeremy Blake is missing, according to New York City investigators, and he apparently drowned himself Tuesday night, said Lance Kinz, co-owner of the Manhattan art gallery that represents Blake. Police said a man "tentatively identified" as Blake was seen stripping to his shorts and disappearing into the surf at Rockaway Beach in Queens, N.Y., where no body had been found by Friday. Kinz said Blake's friends are convinced it was him because his wallet and clothes were found in the sand.
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | Jessica Hundley, Special to The Times
Jeremy Blake's digital art is painting made animate, color and pattern transformed from stagnant image into slow, liquid, meditative motion. Working initially with ink and gouache drawings (and at times sketching directly onto the computer), Blake manipulates his work into dreamlike DVD animations.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you haven't seen CD-ROM director Theresa Duncan's earlier work, you'll think that her new release, "Smartypants," is far and away the best disk ever for young girls. It is, except for her earlier CD-ROM "Chop Suey," which is even better. Either one would make a great gift for girls in the 7 to 12 age group, and no doubt a lot of computer-savvy boys would like them too.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"New York is so over," says Bret Easton Ellis, sitting behind the glass-topped desk in his home office. "Who cares about New York? L.A. is where it's at right now." Outside the windows of his high-rise, hillside apartment, Los Angeles appears serene, nothing but green treetops, a few glittery skyscrapers and a hazy horizon. From here, there is little evidence of the dead-eyed rich kids and existential dread of a city "afraid to merge," as Ellis wrote in "Less Than Zero." Published in 1985, the book was heralded as a cultural touchstone by baby boomers looking to understand what was then called the MTV generation.
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