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Jeremy Bloom

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January 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
Two-sport star Jeremy Bloom intends to play football next fall -- and accept skiing endorsements in defiance of the NCAA. Bloom said his decision Monday is intended to force the NCAA's hand, requiring the organization to either change its position or prevent him from playing football. The NCAA has ruled that Bloom cannot accept skiing endorsements and also play football. Bloom maintains such money is necessary to fund his freestyle ski career.
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SPORTS
February 16, 2006 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
Jeremy Bloom wasn't about to let the end of his skiing career -- if this was indeed it -- be marred by a slight bobble. The celebrated American skier wasn't about to sulk after struggling with the landing of his second aerial in the men's moguls, losing costly points and finishing sixth Wednesday at the 2006 Winter Olympics. "It was a great day," he said. "I can't allow a small mistake to ruin that."
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SPORTS
February 16, 2006 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
Jeremy Bloom wasn't about to let the end of his skiing career -- if this was indeed it -- be marred by a slight bobble. The celebrated American skier wasn't about to sulk after struggling with the landing of his second aerial in the men's moguls, losing costly points and finishing sixth Wednesday at the 2006 Winter Olympics. "It was a great day," he said. "I can't allow a small mistake to ruin that."
SPORTS
February 15, 2006 | David Wharton and Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writers
To Jeremy Bloom, pressure means playing football in a sold-out stadium, dropping back to field a punt. Pressure means heading for the NFL combine in Indianapolis later this month in hopes of impressing league scouts enough to get selected in the draft. So where does that leave Bloom's other sport? What about the Winter Olympics and today's final in the men's moguls? "There's not much like returning a punt," he said. "No one's running to take my head off."
SPORTS
October 6, 2002 | MICHAEL DOBIE, NEWSDAY
He could have been wearing Tommy and cavorting with supermodels. He could have been in the Chilean Andes, carving trails through deep moguls and hanging with his U.S. Ski teammates at night. He could have been an on-air celebrity for MTV, swimming in the adoration of fans enamored by his hot looks and cool intensity. Jeremy Bloom could have had it all. Instead, he's stretching muscles and bruising bones he never knew he had. He's getting reamed every day by cantankerous coaches.
SPORTS
February 15, 2006 | David Wharton and Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writers
To Jeremy Bloom, pressure means playing football in a sold-out stadium, dropping back to field a punt. Pressure means heading for the NFL combine in Indianapolis later this month in hopes of impressing league scouts enough to get selected in the draft. So where does that leave Bloom's other sport? What about the Winter Olympics and today's final in the men's moguls? "There's not much like returning a punt," he said. "No one's running to take my head off."
SPORTS
August 20, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Olympic skier Jeremy Bloom decided Monday to give up his endorsement deals and play football for Colorado. Bloom, ninth in freestyle moguls at the Salt Lake City Games, had hoped to keep his skiing sponsorship deals while playing for Colorado, but NCAA rules prohibit endorsements by college athletes. On Thursday, a judge denied Bloom's request to bar the NCAA from enforcing those rules. Bloom, who will be a freshman receiver, still hopes to ski in the 2006 Olympics.
SPORTS
April 7, 2004 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Jeremy Bloom loves playing college football. He adores the once-a-week roar of 70,000 fans at kickoff and the daily silence of 80 guys whose only noise is hard breathing at an intense practice. Bloom, 22, also loves moguls skiing. His heart flutters when he soars off a bump in a snow, propelled high in the sky to do somersaults and rolls and twists until he lands with a soft splat on the snow.
SPORTS
February 9, 2002
Jeremy Bloom, the leader in the World Cup points race, heads a strong United States team in the moguls. Teammate Jonny Mosley won gold at Nagano in '98. Finland's Janne Lehtela and Mikko Ronkainen should be contenders. American Eric Bergoust is the favorite in the aerials, followed by Ales Valenta of the Czech Republic and Alexei Grichin of Belarus. Norway's Kari Traa is the women's moguls World Cup leader, followed by Aiko Uemura of Japan and Hannah Hardaway of the U.S.
SPORTS
August 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
The NCAA has denied Jeremy Bloom's request to play football at Colorado while accepting endorsements to support his skiing career. The decision, which was announced Tuesday, probably means that Bloom's football career is over unless the NCAA reverses itself on appeal, university spokeswoman Lindsey Babcock said. Coach Gary Barnett said the university has appealed the decision. It was not immediately clear when the NCAA would act on the appeal.
SPORTS
April 7, 2004 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Jeremy Bloom loves playing college football. He adores the once-a-week roar of 70,000 fans at kickoff and the daily silence of 80 guys whose only noise is hard breathing at an intense practice. Bloom, 22, also loves moguls skiing. His heart flutters when he soars off a bump in a snow, propelled high in the sky to do somersaults and rolls and twists until he lands with a soft splat on the snow.
SPORTS
January 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
Two-sport star Jeremy Bloom intends to play football next fall -- and accept skiing endorsements in defiance of the NCAA. Bloom said his decision Monday is intended to force the NCAA's hand, requiring the organization to either change its position or prevent him from playing football. The NCAA has ruled that Bloom cannot accept skiing endorsements and also play football. Bloom maintains such money is necessary to fund his freestyle ski career.
SPORTS
October 6, 2002 | MICHAEL DOBIE, NEWSDAY
He could have been wearing Tommy and cavorting with supermodels. He could have been in the Chilean Andes, carving trails through deep moguls and hanging with his U.S. Ski teammates at night. He could have been an on-air celebrity for MTV, swimming in the adoration of fans enamored by his hot looks and cool intensity. Jeremy Bloom could have had it all. Instead, he's stretching muscles and bruising bones he never knew he had. He's getting reamed every day by cantankerous coaches.
SPORTS
August 20, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Olympic skier Jeremy Bloom decided Monday to give up his endorsement deals and play football for Colorado. Bloom, ninth in freestyle moguls at the Salt Lake City Games, had hoped to keep his skiing sponsorship deals while playing for Colorado, but NCAA rules prohibit endorsements by college athletes. On Thursday, a judge denied Bloom's request to bar the NCAA from enforcing those rules. Bloom, who will be a freshman receiver, still hopes to ski in the 2006 Olympics.
SPORTS
February 12, 2002
Jonny Moseley is back to defend his title from 1998 in the men's moguls final, but some of the acrobatic air has gone out from underneath his skis in the last four years. He and his patented "Dinner Roll" barely made the U.S. team. Jeremy Bloom, who delayed his college football career at Colorado to prepare for the Olympics, is the best American hope. He comes here leading the World Cup moguls standings. Finns are favored.
SPORTS
September 12, 2004 | Dave Kindred, Sporting News
Tori Allen is 16 years old, a rock climber. Jeremy Bloom, 22, is a freestyle skier. Eighty-three years old, Hugh Cunningham is a retired university professor of journalism. They believe the folks who run big-time college athletics don't have a clue. Agreed. Still, sometimes the NCAA panjandrums are more foolish than other times. This time, in fact, they have about busted the Fool-O-Meter. They have ruled Jeremy Bloom "permanently ineligible," as if he were Shoeless Joe Jackson or Charlie Hustle.
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