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Jeremy Brett

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NEWS
November 3, 1991
It certainly isn't elementary for an actor to play Sherlock Holmes. At least it hasn't been for Jeremy Brett, who begins his eighth season this month as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's super snoop on PBS' "Mystery!" series. (And the first five seasons are repeating on cable's Arts & Entertainment Network.) "I enjoy playing him now," Brett said. "He doesn't hurt me any more." Brett, 55, was holding court at a corner table at the Polo Lounge at the Beverly Hills Hotel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
When British actor Jeremy Brett was offered the part of Sherlock Holmes in 1981 he was reluctant to take it, fearing he'd be unable to do justice to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's venerable character. At the time of his death of heart disease nine months ago, however, the consensus among Holmes aficionados was that Brett's blazing characterization, hammered out in 40 episodes filmed over 14 years, will stand as the one to top for decades to come.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeremy Brett doesn't do mantelpieces. The foremost expositor of the mind and mannerisms of Sherlock Holmes in particular does not pose for photographs standing at mantelpieces laden with the coy and overworked ephemera of the Holmes canon, like a calabash pipe. Even to be asked to do so brings a quiver to his raptor's nose, that wonderful antennae of detection and sensibility.
NEWS
November 3, 1991
It certainly isn't elementary for an actor to play Sherlock Holmes. At least it hasn't been for Jeremy Brett, who begins his eighth season this month as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's super snoop on PBS' "Mystery!" series. (And the first five seasons are repeating on cable's Arts & Entertainment Network.) "I enjoy playing him now," Brett said. "He doesn't hurt me any more." Brett, 55, was holding court at a corner table at the Polo Lounge at the Beverly Hills Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
When British actor Jeremy Brett was offered the part of Sherlock Holmes in 1981 he was reluctant to take it, fearing he'd be unable to do justice to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's venerable character. At the time of his death of heart disease nine months ago, however, the consensus among Holmes aficionados was that Brett's blazing characterization, hammered out in 40 episodes filmed over 14 years, will stand as the one to top for decades to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1996
May I express my admiration, my undying devotion and my astonishment for a parenthetical reference in Kristine McKenna's piece on Jeremy Brett (Film Clips, June 9): "He played Audrey Hepburn's ardent suitor in George Cukor's 1964 film adaptation of 'My Fair Lady.' " Gadzooks! How could this happen--an actual admission that a theatrical or literary work existed prior to being photographed. And in Los Angeles. Blasphemy! Not long ago, I played charades with some young friends, and whenever I offered the category of "a book" or "a play"--"The Prince of Tides," say, or "The Man Who Came to Dinner"--they were outraged when stumped; these existed only as movies.
NEWS
July 9, 1985 | Associated Press
Joan Wilson, producer since 1973 of public television's "Masterpiece Theatre" series, has died of cancer, station WGBH-TV announced. "She was 'Masterpiece Theatre,' " the host of the series, Alistair Cooke, was quoted as saying in a statement released by the station after her death Thursday. "She chose the dishes with ruthless care and taste. She supervised their service. I was simply the headwaiter." Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996
One would think you've hired Inspector Lestrade as a copy editor, given the blunders in Kristine McKenna's otherwise excellent tribute to Jeremy Brett ("Sherlock Holmes' Greatest Interpreter," June 9). Although Richard Burton was an excellent King Arthur, he never played the great detective, on stage, film, television or radio. Ditto for James Mason, though he was a capable Dr. Watson in "Murder by Decree," opposite Christopher Plummer's Holmes. As for Brett's wonderfully neurotic interpretation of Holmes, television audiences in both Britain and the United States first saw him in "A Scandal in Bohemia."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"An Act of Reprisal," presented by the AFI/USA Independent Showcase at Laemmle's Monica 4-Plex, is a shelved film, unseen for more than 25 years. Neither negligible nor meretricious, it's grown into a likable period piece. Shot in Cyprus in 1964 for about $300,000, it's a romantic-political melodrama, from a Christian-liberal perspective, that turns on a simple Romeo-Juliet, universal brotherhood theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeremy Brett doesn't do mantelpieces. The foremost expositor of the mind and mannerisms of Sherlock Holmes in particular does not pose for photographs standing at mantelpieces laden with the coy and overworked ephemera of the Holmes canon, like a calabash pipe. Even to be asked to do so brings a quiver to his raptor's nose, that wonderful antennae of detection and sensibility.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | SUSAN KING
The game's afoot again. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's supersleuth Sherlock Holmes andhis associate, Dr. Watson, are doggedly pursuing their archenemy, Prof.Moriarty, in the new CBS thriller, "Hands of a Murderer," which airs Wednesdayat 9 p.m. on KCBS. Edward Woodward of "The Equalizer" fame stars as Holmes and John Hillerman of"Magnum P.I." is Watson. Anthony Andrews of "Brideshead Revisited" playsMoriarty.
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