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Jeremy Isaacs

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After serving with distinction as chief executive of Independent Television's high-brow Channel 4, Jeremy Isaacs had hoped to become director general of the British Broadcasting Corp. But he was passed over for that job, possibly because he had spent most of his career with a BBC rival. Instead, he received a glittering consolation post: He was tapped to head the Royal Opera House, at Covent Garden.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After serving with distinction as chief executive of Independent Television's high-brow Channel 4, Jeremy Isaacs had hoped to become director general of the British Broadcasting Corp. But he was passed over for that job, possibly because he had spent most of his career with a BBC rival. Instead, he received a glittering consolation post: He was tapped to head the Royal Opera House, at Covent Garden.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
British TV executive Jeremy Isaacs will take over as the new general director of the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden, the London opera company announced Wednesday. Isaacs, 54, has headed the independent arts-oriented Channel 4 since it began in 1981. He will replace Sir John Tooley, whose contract ends in the summer of 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
As the deadline for applications to head the British Broadcasting Corp. passed Tuesday, speculation on likely candidates centered on veteran BBC presenter David Dimbleby and Jeremy Isaacs, chief executive of the rival independent Channel 4. Others mentioned as possible successors to Alasdair Milne, who resigned abruptly Jan. 29, include deputy director general Michael Checkland and BBC radio managing director Brian Wenham.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Sadler's Wells Royal Ballet is leaving London and moving 110 miles northwest to the industrial city of Birmingham. The lure: $10.6 million in extra funding. "The facilities to be built in Birmingham and the new money to be made available add up to an offer we cannot refuse," explains Jeremy Isaacs, director of the Royal Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990 | From Associated Press
Top ticket prices at the Royal Opera House will exceed $170 for the first time next season, the financially struggling company says. Beginning in September, opera tickets at the theater in Covent Garden will jump on average by 17% while ballet seats will rise 25%. The decision to raise prices comes as the theater struggles with an accumulated deficit of about $8.5 million. The company projects a deficit of $3.4 million this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
London operagoers are going to have to dig deeper into their wallets for tickets. The price of the best seats at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, will rise to about $170 each when Luciano Pavarotti and Placido Domingo sing there next season. General director Jeremy Isaacs said, "We either charge these prices or we go out of business." He also announced an 11% overall rise on seats for other than special performances.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | From Associated Press
Sir Kenneth MacMillan, who revived the tradition of full-length ballet in Britain as principal choreographer of the Royal Ballet, has died of a heart attack. He was 62. MacMillan was stricken Thursday while backstage at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden during a performance of "Mayerling," his ballet that first was seen in 1978.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sir Geraint Evans, the Welsh-born baritone who for three decades set the standard for the Falstaffs of the operatic world, died Sunday. A spokesman for his family said the coal miner's son died in a hospital in Aberystwyth in northern Wales after suffering a heart attack at his nearby home a week earlier. Evans was 70. His wife, Brenda, and their two sons were at his bedside.
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