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Jeremy Kramer

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent Saturday night at about 8:30, in the back room of a small coffee shop off Hollywood Boulevard and Las Palmas called Killer Burger No. 1, three people sat in front of a TV set watching a History Channel documentary on the Nuremberg trials. This might not sound odd, but Saturday night is comedy night at Killer Burger, and none of the three men watching the Nuremberg trials looked as if they would start telling jokes any time soon. Just then, in walked Jeremy Kramer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent Saturday night at about 8:30, in the back room of a small coffee shop off Hollywood Boulevard and Las Palmas called Killer Burger No. 1, three people sat in front of a TV set watching a History Channel documentary on the Nuremberg trials. This might not sound odd, but Saturday night is comedy night at Killer Burger, and none of the three men watching the Nuremberg trials looked as if they would start telling jokes any time soon. Just then, in walked Jeremy Kramer.
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NEWS
December 6, 2001
8pm Theater "Exmass," a dark musical comedy by Bradley Rand Smith, Lewis Black and Mark Houghtaling, presented cabaret-style, explores holiday joys and despair. "Exmass," Open Fist Theatre Company, 1625 N. La Brea Ave., Hollywood, Thursdays to Fridays, 8 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 and 8 p.m.; Sundays, 7 p.m. Ends Dec. 22. $15, except Sundays, pay-what-you-can. (323) 882-6912. * 8pm Comedy Freebie Singing. Sketches. Human sacrifice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Get Over It" is a blithe-spirited comedy in which teenagers discover their romantic vicissitudes mirrored in their high school production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." It's being directed by their nasty drama teacher (Martin Short, hilarious), who has written 12 original songs for the production. "Bill Shakespeare was a wonderful poet, but Burt Bacharach he was not!" declares Short's Dr. Desmond Forrest Oakes, as grandiose as his name.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Duplex" is a mildly diverting dark comedy, directed with amiable mischievousness by Danny DeVito and starring an appealing Ben Stiller and Drew Barrymore. Its drawback is that it's a one-joke affair, leading to a repetitiousness that makes the film seem overlong even at 87 minutes. Life is good for Stiller's Alex and Barrymore's Nancy. Having made a promising debut, he is nearing completion of his second novel, and she has a good job at a magazine, but they need a bigger place.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freddie Prinze Jr. and Julia Stiles are as appealing a pair of young lovers as you could wish for. And as long as first-time writer-director Kris Isacsson focuses squarely on them, "Down to You" plays well as a story of how two intelligent, privileged people meet in college, then fall passionately in love lots faster than they were prepared for.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Boys and Girls," a likably thoughtful romantic comedy, suggests that as we enter the new millennium the dating game is getting tougher by the second, especially among the best and the brightest. So self-conscious and ultimately just plain scared are Freddie Prinze Jr.'s Ryan and Claire Forlani's Jennifer that they are in danger of succumbing to total paralysis. Jennifer and Ryan did not get off to the best of starts, when, as kids, they happen to be seated next to each other on a plane.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Wiley Roberts leaned into the batter's box, glaring as Marty Rackham went into his windup. Rackham delivered the pitch and Roberts swung ferociously, hitting the wicked sinker deep to right. The ball sailed over the fence, a towering 77-foot shot. The crowd, sitting in bleachers that once graced Anaheim Stadium, applauded loudly between swigs of beer, then settled back and checked a nearby television to see how the Yankees-A's playoff game was going.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | Deborah Netburn, Special to The Times
"Magazines are launched every day, but it is not every day that a young boy becomes a man," said Richard Rushfield, dressed in a tuxedo and addressing the 300 people assembled (mostly around the cash bars) in the second-floor ballroom of the Friars Club in Beverly Hills. They were gathered there Wednesday night, according to the e-vite, for a twofold purpose: to celebrate the launch of L.A.
NEWS
August 22, 1986 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
The word from Washington hit the streets here with all the enthusiasm traditionally reserved for a flat tire in rush-hour traffic. After years of impassioned warnings to "Buckle up!"--and now a state law that requires it--the National Transportation Safety Board last week issued a report saying that rear seat belts of the lap variety might be hazardous to your health.
MAGAZINE
September 19, 1999 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, Paul Brownfield is a staff writer in The Times' Calendar section
Robin Williams, the $20-million-a-picture star, is standing outside a comedy club near his home in San Francisco. It's a drizzly August night, going on 10:30. Williams' personal assistant drifts in and out of the club as Williams waits in a deserted courtyard. He is doing absolutely nothing. He doesn't pace. He doesn't crack jokes. He's off the clock, and off the clock Williams is not a clown. Tonight, you could project a million different emotions onto his face. He's vulnerable. He's guarded.
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