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Jeremy Levin

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August 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Jeremy Levin, one of two American journalists who say they have escaped from captors in Lebanon, said Wednesday that he returned to Syria last month for the first time in over two years. "This was my first trip to Syria since my release," Levin said in a telephone interview. "I met people--both private and official--who had been helpful to my wife on my behalf." Levin, who works for Cable News Network, said he spent July 12-17 in Damascus, Syria, with his wife, Lucille.
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NEWS
August 1, 1989 | OSWALD JOHNSTON and DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writers
Former hostages and relatives and friends of hostages still in Beirut reacted Monday with numbed anger to the fact that the Bush Administration, like its two predecessors, seems trapped in a hopeless dilemma: Inaction consigns hostages to continued imprisonment, while action dooms them. A number of them also blamed Israel for precipitating the current crisis. A pro-Iranian Shiite Muslim faction said Monday that it had executed Marine Lt. Col. William R.
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NEWS
August 1, 1989 | OSWALD JOHNSTON and DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writers
Former hostages and relatives and friends of hostages still in Beirut reacted Monday with numbed anger to the fact that the Bush Administration, like its two predecessors, seems trapped in a hopeless dilemma: Inaction consigns hostages to continued imprisonment, while action dooms them. A number of them also blamed Israel for precipitating the current crisis. A pro-Iranian Shiite Muslim faction said Monday that it had executed Marine Lt. Col. William R.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Jeremy Levin, one of two American journalists who say they have escaped from captors in Lebanon, said Wednesday that he returned to Syria last month for the first time in over two years. "This was my first trip to Syria since my release," Levin said in a telephone interview. "I met people--both private and official--who had been helpful to my wife on my behalf." Levin, who works for Cable News Network, said he spent July 12-17 in Damascus, Syria, with his wife, Lucille.
NEWS
February 16, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The kidnapers of American journalist Jeremy Levin may have intentionally allowed him to escape, and if so, Syria probably deserves much of the credit for his freedom, a senior State Department official said Friday. The official, who asked not to be identified by name, cited no firm evidence for that conclusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1985
2 Ex-Hostages to Be Welcomed: Two former American hostages in Beirut, the Rev. Benjamin Weir and television journalist Jeremy Levin, will be welcomed in a ceremony Monday at the Westminster Civic Center, 8200 Westminster Blvd. The families of the remaining Beirut hostages are expected to attend the celebration, which will include a prayer vigil in honor of their relatives. The 2:30 p.m. ceremony is being sponsored by residents at the Hy-Lond Convalescent Hospital.
NEWS
February 20, 1985
President Reagan asked television journalist Jeremy Levin to refrain from disclosing publicly any details about his ordeal as a hostage in Lebanon that "even inadvertently" might endanger four other Americans presumed kidnaped by the same terrorists. "I can't tell you how gratified Nancy and I were to learn of your escape," Reagan said in a telephone conversation with Levin broadcast on the Cable News Network.
NEWS
March 17, 1986
The wife of former Beirut hostage Jeremy Levin said she will return to the Mideast on a "woman-to-woman" peace mission because "the American people . . . have not been given the facts" about the remaining American captives. Lucille Levin said she will be accompanied by Patsy Collins, chairman of King Broadcasting Co., and two others and that they will meet with Arab and Israeli women. Muslim militants are believed to hold six Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1985 | Amalia Duarte \f7
The families of seven Americans kidnaped in Beirut sent a Christmas present of a dozen roses to each resident of the Hy-Lond Convalescent Hospital who hasadopted the hostages in prayer. The residents have held prayer vigils every day since July for the release of the captured Americans. "It makes the residents feel like they are contributing to the hostages' release," said Nancy Fontaine, activities director of the Westminster home.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Dallas billionaire H. Ross Perot says he asked the Rev. Jesse Jackson to help free American hostages held in Beirut and financed a 1985 trip by the Democratic presidential contender, according to a report published Tuesday. Perot said the National Security Council asked him to contact Jackson to negotiate for the hostages' release. "We had one hostage, (CIA agent William) Buckley, who knew too much and it was very important to get him back.
NEWS
February 16, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The kidnapers of American journalist Jeremy Levin may have intentionally allowed him to escape, and if so, Syria probably deserves much of the credit for his freedom, a senior State Department official said Friday. The official, who asked not to be identified by name, cited no firm evidence for that conclusion.
NEWS
February 15, 1985 | Associated Press
Jeremy Levin, the kidnaped American television correspondent who escaped from his chains after 11 months in captivity, flew here today for an emotional reunion with his wife. Levin took a chartered flight from Damascus, Syria, to the U.S. Rhein-Main Air Force Base near Frankfurt. His family, flown there by a White House jet, awaited his arrival. Early in the day, Levin had been turned over to U.S. Ambassador William Eagleton by Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk Sharaa in Damascus.
NEWS
February 19, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan today asked television journalist Jeremy Levin to refrain from revealing any details to colleagues about his ordeal as a hostage in Lebanon that "even inadvertently" might endanger four other Americans presumed kidnaped by the same terrorists. "I can't tell you how gratified Nancy and I were to learn of your escape," Reagan said in an on-air telephone conversation with Levin over the Cable News Network.
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