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Jeremy Michael Boorda

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NEWS
May 20, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda was buried in the shadow of the Pentagon, where he had worked since April 1994 as the Navy's top officer. On a sweltering spring afternoon, family members held a private ceremony at the grave in Arlington National Cemetery a few hundred yards from the Pentagon. Boorda, 56, chief of naval operations, committed suicide after learning about a media inquiry into whether he had improperly worn decorations. "Adm.
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NEWS
November 25, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a note written before his suicide last May, Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, then the Navy's top officer, indicated that he was deeply concerned about recent criticism of the service and "couldn't bear to bring dishonor" to sailors over questions about whether he had improperly worn decorations given to veterans of combat.
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NEWS
March 15, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Monday nominated Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda, commander of the allied air armada enforcing the allied ultimatum in Bosnia, to become chief of naval operations, replacing retiring Adm. Frank B. Kelso II as the Navy's top uniformed officer. Kelso, 60, is stepping down April 30, two months ahead of schedule, as part of a negotiated agreement in which Defense Secretary William J. Perry issued a statement that effectively cleared the admiral in the Tailhook sex harassment scandal.
NEWS
July 25, 1996
The media inquiry that led to the suicide of Chief of Naval Operations Jeremy M. "Mike" Boorda has claimed another victim. Roger Charles, the reporter who broke the story on Boorda's right to wear certain combat decorations, has been fired in the wake of a backlash against his employer, the National Security News Service. The reason, his bosses said, is that donations to the nonprofit group have dropped since the Boorda tragedy in May, leaving the news service with a $60,000 deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1996
Re "Navy's Top Admiral Dies in Apparent Suicide Shooting," May 17: It's a damn shame the media must focus on an unimportant and trivial matter that can and did ruin a person's life and career. I am a decorated combat veteran of the Korean War; I served and fought there during 1950-1951. I in no way feel that Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda's wearing of the Vietnam combat ribbon lessened his abilities to lead or diminished his accomplishments. Perhaps he wore the ribbons because he was proud of the men and women of the Navy who served their country during the Vietnam conflict.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda was eulogized Tuesday by President Clinton as a military leader who had a "deep sense of honor which no person should ever question." Boorda, the Navy's top officer, killed himself Thursday amid questions about whether he had earned the right to wear certain combat decorations on his uniform. During a memorial service at Washington National Cathedral, Clinton did not mention Boorda's suicide.
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Military officials and colleagues of Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda strained Friday to understand why questions raised about his service decorations would have prompted him to take his own life, as apparently indicated by suicide notes he left behind. Amid an outpouring of sympathy over the personal tragedy that befell the Navy's former top admiral, civilian officials and military personnel in the Pentagon's offices and hallways were at a loss to explain how Boorda could have reacted so strongly.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy's top admiral died in an apparent suicide Thursday just before a newsmagazine was preparing to question him about whether he was wearing a combat decoration to which he was not entitled, Pentagon officials said. Chief of Naval Operations Jeremy Michael Boorda apparently shot himself in the chest at his home at the Washington Navy Yard, using a .38-caliber pistol that belongs to his son-in-law, according to Pentagon officials.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | JOHN MINTZ, WASHINGTON POST
President Clinton spent a tearful hour and a half Saturday consoling the widow of Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda and their four children in the family's home at the Washington Navy Yard. The visit ended with Clinton and the family holding hands in prayer for Boorda, the Navy's top officer, who shot himself outside the house on Thursday. "It was a very personal and emotional visit," said White House spokesman Brian Cullen. "As overwhelming as it was for the family, they were grateful he was there."
NEWS
May 18, 1996
Navy officials find it hard to connect Adm. Jeremy Boorda's death to the medals issue, although some report the top officer had expressed anxiety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1996
Re "Navy's Top Admiral Dies in Apparent Suicide Shooting," May 17: It's a damn shame the media must focus on an unimportant and trivial matter that can and did ruin a person's life and career. I am a decorated combat veteran of the Korean War; I served and fought there during 1950-1951. I in no way feel that Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda's wearing of the Vietnam combat ribbon lessened his abilities to lead or diminished his accomplishments. Perhaps he wore the ribbons because he was proud of the men and women of the Navy who served their country during the Vietnam conflict.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda was eulogized Tuesday by President Clinton as a military leader who had a "deep sense of honor which no person should ever question." Boorda, the Navy's top officer, killed himself Thursday amid questions about whether he had earned the right to wear certain combat decorations on his uniform. During a memorial service at Washington National Cathedral, Clinton did not mention Boorda's suicide.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda was buried in the shadow of the Pentagon, where he had worked since April 1994 as the Navy's top officer. On a sweltering spring afternoon, family members held a private ceremony at the grave in Arlington National Cemetery a few hundred yards from the Pentagon. Boorda, 56, chief of naval operations, committed suicide after learning about a media inquiry into whether he had improperly worn decorations. "Adm.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | JOHN MINTZ, WASHINGTON POST
President Clinton spent a tearful hour and a half Saturday consoling the widow of Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda and their four children in the family's home at the Washington Navy Yard. The visit ended with Clinton and the family holding hands in prayer for Boorda, the Navy's top officer, who shot himself outside the house on Thursday. "It was a very personal and emotional visit," said White House spokesman Brian Cullen. "As overwhelming as it was for the family, they were grateful he was there."
NEWS
May 18, 1996
Navy officials find it hard to connect Adm. Jeremy Boorda's death to the medals issue, although some report the top officer had expressed anxiety.
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Military officials and colleagues of Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda strained Friday to understand why questions raised about his service decorations would have prompted him to take his own life, as apparently indicated by suicide notes he left behind. Amid an outpouring of sympathy over the personal tragedy that befell the Navy's former top admiral, civilian officials and military personnel in the Pentagon's offices and hallways were at a loss to explain how Boorda could have reacted so strongly.
NEWS
July 25, 1996
The media inquiry that led to the suicide of Chief of Naval Operations Jeremy M. "Mike" Boorda has claimed another victim. Roger Charles, the reporter who broke the story on Boorda's right to wear certain combat decorations, has been fired in the wake of a backlash against his employer, the National Security News Service. The reason, his bosses said, is that donations to the nonprofit group have dropped since the Boorda tragedy in May, leaving the news service with a $60,000 deficit.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a note written before his suicide last May, Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, then the Navy's top officer, indicated that he was deeply concerned about recent criticism of the service and "couldn't bear to bring dishonor" to sailors over questions about whether he had improperly worn decorations given to veterans of combat.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy's top admiral died in an apparent suicide Thursday just before a newsmagazine was preparing to question him about whether he was wearing a combat decoration to which he was not entitled, Pentagon officials said. Chief of Naval Operations Jeremy Michael Boorda apparently shot himself in the chest at his home at the Washington Navy Yard, using a .38-caliber pistol that belongs to his son-in-law, according to Pentagon officials.
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Monday nominated Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda, commander of the allied air armada enforcing the allied ultimatum in Bosnia, to become chief of naval operations, replacing retiring Adm. Frank B. Kelso II as the Navy's top uniformed officer. Kelso, 60, is stepping down April 30, two months ahead of schedule, as part of a negotiated agreement in which Defense Secretary William J. Perry issued a statement that effectively cleared the admiral in the Tailhook sex harassment scandal.
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