Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJeremy Rifkin
IN THE NEWS

Jeremy Rifkin

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
July 26, 1987 | John Balzar, Balzar is a Times staff writer. His most recent article on the subject of time was published in the journal of the Precision Measurements Assn.
The passenger on the PSA flight fidgeted through her briefcase and huffed at the window. You know the type. Even at 600 miles an hour, she was not going fast enough. Here, you should read this, it was suggested. She barely glanced at the jacket of "Time Wars." "Gee, ah, I just don't have the time . . . " she hurried to explain, her face wearing a look of you-know-how-it-is. Of course we do. Time enslaves us so exquisitely and completely that we rarely think to ponder it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Lyft, the ride-sharing service known for the pink furry mustache on its drivers' cars, is growing. The company expanded into 24 mid-size cities across the country Thursday. It's great news for the sharing economy. But should we really be celebrating a system that is, in effect, a Band-Aid solution for unemployment and those people struggling financially in post-recession America? I'm not necessarily opposed to the sharing economy, though I did have a frightening Uber experience with a speeding, texting driver, and personally I'd rather stay in a hotel over an Airbnb home rental, which kind of creeps me out. As Jeremy Rifkin recently wrote in our Op-Ed pages , it's a “winning economic model” that “will change the course of economic history.” Using Airbnb as an example, Rifkin attributed the success of sharing services to “near zero marginal cost,” a new phenomenon he says that allows companies to expand without much of a financial investment.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 3, 2000 | GARY CHAPMAN
Jeremy Rifkin has another "big idea," which he describes in great detail in his new book "The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism Where All of Life is a Paid-For Experience" (Tarcher/Putnam, 2000). Rifkin, the author of other big-idea books such as "The End of Work" and "The Biotech Century," is the preeminent master of overstatement. His books, nevertheless, are fascinating insights into long-term economic and cultural trends that he covers in encyclopedic detail.
OPINION
April 9, 2014
Re "A sharing economy," Opinion, April 6 Before I read Jaron Lanier's revelatory book, "Who Owns the Future?," I might have blithely accepted the capitalistic efficiency of the sharing economy as described by Jeremy Rifkin. But consider the case of my cab driver: His professional, safe, reliable and fully insured service is getting killed by under-regulated siphons such as Lyft. Airbnb promises to do the same to hotels by exploiting unfair advantages. Who knows which industry will be next?
FOOD
May 14, 1992 | ANNE MENDELSON
By now most news-watchers, and some who ignore all the news they can, have been at least dimly exposed to the idea that the rich representation of meat in Western diets is a banner of regress rather than progress, a priority that has disastrously skewed both our own agriculture and the choices of developing nations.
BOOKS
March 12, 1995 | James Flanigan, Flanigan is a Times business columnist
It wasn't supposed to be this way. In "The Iceman Cometh," the anarchist character Hugo Kalmar cries out that once the revolution comes, "we will eat hot dogs and drink free beer beneath the willow trees." Well, the technological revolution has come. Everywhere, computers and other electronic machines are enhancing human capabilities, making work more productive and eliminating heavy lifting.
NEWS
April 10, 1986
Environmentalist Jeremy Rifkin said he has delayed filing a suit against the Agriculture Department to allow it to reconsider its licensing of a genetically engineered swine vaccine. On Tuesday, in response to a Rifkin petition demanding the license be suspended or revoked, the department announced a two-week suspension of the vaccine's license in order to do an environmental impact study. The vaccine would be used against pseudorabies, a sometimes-fatal swine virus.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Suit Over Cow Drug Is Dismissed: A U.S. District Court judge in Washington, D.C., has ruled that anti-biotechnology activist Jeremy Rifkin and 14 farmers lacked jurisdiction to bring suit against the U.S Department of Agriculture and the National Dairy Promotion and Research Board. The suit contended that the agency and the board were unlawfully promoting bovine somatotropin, a synthetic hormone--that has not been approved--designed to increase cows' milk production.
OPINION
April 9, 2014
Re "A sharing economy," Opinion, April 6 Before I read Jaron Lanier's revelatory book, "Who Owns the Future?," I might have blithely accepted the capitalistic efficiency of the sharing economy as described by Jeremy Rifkin. But consider the case of my cab driver: His professional, safe, reliable and fully insured service is getting killed by under-regulated siphons such as Lyft. Airbnb promises to do the same to hotels by exploiting unfair advantages. Who knows which industry will be next?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1986
An animal disease called pseudorabies has reached epidemic proportions among the nation's herds of swine. The disease, caused by a herpes-like virus, is almost always fatal in pigs, so the effect on the food supply is serious and growing. In response, Biologics Corp. of Omaha has produced a vaccine called Omnivac-PRV. What's interesting about this vaccine is that it is made by genetic engineering.
BOOKS
December 12, 2004 | Anthony Pagden, Anthony Pagden is professor of history and political science at UCLA and the author of many books, including "Peoples and Empires" and "European Encounters With the New World."
On Oct. 29, the leaders of the European Union's 25 member countries gathered to sign their first constitution. It still must be ratified by each nation's government, but the signing was, nevertheless, a highly significant moment. The people of Europe are now more united than at any time since Rome's golden age in the 2nd century.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2000 | GARY CHAPMAN
Jeremy Rifkin has another "big idea," which he describes in great detail in his new book "The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism Where All of Life is a Paid-For Experience" (Tarcher/Putnam, 2000). Rifkin, the author of other big-idea books such as "The End of Work" and "The Biotech Century," is the preeminent master of overstatement. His books, nevertheless, are fascinating insights into long-term economic and cultural trends that he covers in encyclopedic detail.
BOOKS
March 12, 1995 | James Flanigan, Flanigan is a Times business columnist
It wasn't supposed to be this way. In "The Iceman Cometh," the anarchist character Hugo Kalmar cries out that once the revolution comes, "we will eat hot dogs and drink free beer beneath the willow trees." Well, the technological revolution has come. Everywhere, computers and other electronic machines are enhancing human capabilities, making work more productive and eliminating heavy lifting.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Shares of agricultural biotechnology pioneer Calgene took a drubbing on the stock market Monday in response to reports that Campbell Soup, one of Calgene's primary supporters in the development of its genetically engineered tomato, was backing away from its commitment. Calgene characterized as "inaccurate and misleading" a report from the activist group Pure Food Campaign that Campbell Soup was withdrawing its support--a potential blow to both Calgene and the fledgling ag-biotech industry.
FOOD
May 14, 1992 | ANNE MENDELSON
By now most news-watchers, and some who ignore all the news they can, have been at least dimly exposed to the idea that the rich representation of meat in Western diets is a banner of regress rather than progress, a priority that has disastrously skewed both our own agriculture and the choices of developing nations.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Suit Over Cow Drug Is Dismissed: A U.S. District Court judge in Washington, D.C., has ruled that anti-biotechnology activist Jeremy Rifkin and 14 farmers lacked jurisdiction to bring suit against the U.S Department of Agriculture and the National Dairy Promotion and Research Board. The suit contended that the agency and the board were unlawfully promoting bovine somatotropin, a synthetic hormone--that has not been approved--designed to increase cows' milk production.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1987
Jeremy Rifkin, who has single-handedly and single-mindedly waged war against biotechnology, has used the courts in the past to block important research and experimentation in genetic engineering. Fortunately, his luck seems to have run out. A few weeks ago U.S. District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell in Washington dismissed two of Rifkin's suits against biotechnology and cleared the way for this work to proceed.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | PETER H. KING
So maybe I didn't read much Tolstoy in college. Maybe I went untutored in the fine points of Descartes and other philosophers. At least my academic career here at Cal Poly was not a complete waste. At least I got to stick my arm inside the stomach of a cow. The animal in question was what is called a fistulated cow. It sported a tidy, and painless, porthole in one side. We searchers of higher knowledge were instructed by our animal science professor to snap on plastic gloves and stand in line.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|