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Jeremy Sisto

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Jeremy Sisto, who starred on "Kidnapped" last season, will return to NBC as a detective on "Law & Order" next season, said Dick Wolf, the series' executive producer. The crime drama will begin its 18th year when it returns to the air in midseason. Although Sisto guest-starred on the series' 17th-season finale last month as a defense attorney, he will be playing a new character with the New York Police Department. He is expected to replace Milena Govich, who played Det. Nina Cassady.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
Note to the producers of NBC's "Today" show: To avoid embarrassment, it might be wise to give your anchors an occasional  crash course on the network's prime-time lineup. On the "What's Trending Today" segment, news anchor Natalie Morales demonstrated that one thing that's not trending for her is her knowledge of what's actually on her network. During the segment, she said that "Law & Order," a drama that has been off NBC's lineup for more than two years, was still on the air. The misstep came during a story about the new Blu-ray edition of the 1997 hit film "Titanic" which features a never-before-seen screen test with star Kate Winslet and Jeremy Sisto as Jack Dawson, the role eventually played by Leonardo DiCaprio.  Though he lost out on "Titanic," Sisto moved on to a successful TV career, including a recurring role on HBO's "Six Feet Under.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
Jeremy Sisto gets around. In the last three years he has portrayed Jesus and Julius Caesar on TV, played Jennifer Lopez's dysfunctional brother ("Angel Eyes") on film and stunned cable viewers as a creepily charming, bipolar sexual predator who's obsessed with his own sister (HBO's "Six Feet Under"). But for the last two weeks, Sisto has been going nowhere fast at the Blank Theatre Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In "Suburgatory," a deft new sitcom premiering Wednesday on ABC, Jane Levy stars as Tessa, a Lower Manhattan teenager whose single father (played by Jeremy Sisto), having discovered a box of condoms in her bedroom, drags his daughter to "the suburbs" in order that she may lead "a normal adolescent existence" somewhere that "box of condoms" does not describe "normal adolescent existence. " "He pulled me out of school, bubble-wrapped my life and threw it into the back of a moving truck," says Tessa in the knowing narrative voice-over common to TV series in which young women come of age. Created by Emily Kapnek, who also created the Nickelodeon middle-school cartoon "As Told by Ginger," it's a neighborhood comedy to sit alongside ABC's "The Middle" — it does, in fact, do that on the schedule — though it is a little more Dorothy-over-the-rainbow in its affect.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009
SERIES Smallville: Tess (Cassidy Freeman) kidnaps Lois (Erica Durance), determined to find out where she went when she disappeared for weeks, while Clark (Tom Welling) makes a significant decision about Zod (Callum Blue) after learning of Lois' memory of the future (8 p.m. KTLA). DietTribe: The women compete in a triathlon and their final weights and makeovers are revealed (8 p.m. Lifetime). Bill Moyers Journal: As President Obama prepares to respond to calls for more troops in Afghanistan, Bill Moyers revisits President Lyndon Johnson's deliberations as he stepped up America's role in Vietnam.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
Timely rerun: Hoping to capitalize on the widespread interest in Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ," CBS said Wednesday it will rebroadcast the second half of its 2000 miniseries "Jesus," starring Jeremy Sisto, on March 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
Note to the producers of NBC's "Today" show: To avoid embarrassment, it might be wise to give your anchors an occasional  crash course on the network's prime-time lineup. On the "What's Trending Today" segment, news anchor Natalie Morales demonstrated that one thing that's not trending for her is her knowledge of what's actually on her network. During the segment, she said that "Law & Order," a drama that has been off NBC's lineup for more than two years, was still on the air. The misstep came during a story about the new Blu-ray edition of the 1997 hit film "Titanic" which features a never-before-seen screen test with star Kate Winslet and Jeremy Sisto as Jack Dawson, the role eventually played by Leonardo DiCaprio.  Though he lost out on "Titanic," Sisto moved on to a successful TV career, including a recurring role on HBO's "Six Feet Under.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: * Today--"The Candidate" (AMC 3-5 p.m.) Jeremy Larner's Oscar-winning screenplay about a fictional California election campaign makes the process so clear that the recent book "Guide to Family Movies" by Nell Minow suggested it as a primer on the subject for kids 12 and up. Robert Redford stars. Rated PG; Available on video.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lorenzo Minoli, executive producer of CBS' ambitious religious drama, "Jesus," was watching the shoot the day last summer in Morocco when Christ was crucified. "It was difficult," said Minoli, who also has produced such religious TV miniseries as "Abraham" and "Joseph." No matter one's denomination, viewers will find it hard not to be touched by the performance of Jeremy Sisto, the 25-year-old actor playing the man the Christian world believes to be the son of God and the Messiah.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In "Suburgatory," a deft new sitcom premiering Wednesday on ABC, Jane Levy stars as Tessa, a Lower Manhattan teenager whose single father (played by Jeremy Sisto), having discovered a box of condoms in her bedroom, drags his daughter to "the suburbs" in order that she may lead "a normal adolescent existence" somewhere that "box of condoms" does not describe "normal adolescent existence. " "He pulled me out of school, bubble-wrapped my life and threw it into the back of a moving truck," says Tessa in the knowing narrative voice-over common to TV series in which young women come of age. Created by Emily Kapnek, who also created the Nickelodeon middle-school cartoon "As Told by Ginger," it's a neighborhood comedy to sit alongside ABC's "The Middle" — it does, in fact, do that on the schedule — though it is a little more Dorothy-over-the-rainbow in its affect.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009
SERIES Smallville: Tess (Cassidy Freeman) kidnaps Lois (Erica Durance), determined to find out where she went when she disappeared for weeks, while Clark (Tom Welling) makes a significant decision about Zod (Callum Blue) after learning of Lois' memory of the future (8 p.m. KTLA). DietTribe: The women compete in a triathlon and their final weights and makeovers are revealed (8 p.m. Lifetime). Bill Moyers Journal: As President Obama prepares to respond to calls for more troops in Afghanistan, Bill Moyers revisits President Lyndon Johnson's deliberations as he stepped up America's role in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Jeremy Sisto, who starred on "Kidnapped" last season, will return to NBC as a detective on "Law & Order" next season, said Dick Wolf, the series' executive producer. The crime drama will begin its 18th year when it returns to the air in midseason. Although Sisto guest-starred on the series' 17th-season finale last month as a defense attorney, he will be playing a new character with the New York Police Department. He is expected to replace Milena Govich, who played Det. Nina Cassady.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
Timely rerun: Hoping to capitalize on the widespread interest in Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ," CBS said Wednesday it will rebroadcast the second half of its 2000 miniseries "Jesus," starring Jeremy Sisto, on March 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
Jeremy Sisto gets around. In the last three years he has portrayed Jesus and Julius Caesar on TV, played Jennifer Lopez's dysfunctional brother ("Angel Eyes") on film and stunned cable viewers as a creepily charming, bipolar sexual predator who's obsessed with his own sister (HBO's "Six Feet Under"). But for the last two weeks, Sisto has been going nowhere fast at the Blank Theatre Company.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lorenzo Minoli, executive producer of CBS' ambitious religious drama, "Jesus," was watching the shoot the day last summer in Morocco when Christ was crucified. "It was difficult," said Minoli, who also has produced such religious TV miniseries as "Abraham" and "Joseph." No matter one's denomination, viewers will find it hard not to be touched by the performance of Jeremy Sisto, the 25-year-old actor playing the man the Christian world believes to be the son of God and the Messiah.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: * Today--"The Candidate" (AMC 3-5 p.m.) Jeremy Larner's Oscar-winning screenplay about a fictional California election campaign makes the process so clear that the recent book "Guide to Family Movies" by Nell Minow suggested it as a primer on the subject for kids 12 and up. Robert Redford stars. Rated PG; Available on video.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hideaway" is not for the faint of heart. It is for the faint of mind. Jeff Goldblum plays Hatch Harrison, who apparently dies in a car accident only to be brought back from "the other side" by a crack team of resuscitators. His wife, Lindsey (Christine Lahti), who also survived the accident with their daughter, Regina (Alicia Silverstone), doesn't quite know what to make of the new Hatch. As soon as he leaves the hospital he gets touchier and touchier. But he's got a right.
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