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Jeremy Strick

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
In July 1999, when Jeremy Strick emerged from the Art Institute of Chicago's curatorial shadows and stepped into the director's spotlight at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, he thought he had found a near-perfect opportunity. He had watched from afar as MOCA burst into life in 1979. As it moved into adolescence, he was impressed with its ability to build a collection, exhibition program and international reputation with astonishing speed. "And I loved Los Angeles," he said this week in an interview in his office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
As a leader in the search for a successor to Jeffrey Deitch as director at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Joel Wachs is no newcomer to MOCA. As L.A. City Council president in the early 1980s, he negotiated the long-term lease under which MOCA pays $1 a year to occupy the cavernous city-owned former warehouse and police car repair building in downtown's Little Tokyo that is now known as the Geffen Contemporary. After a remodeling by architect Frank Gehry, it opened in 1983 as MOCA's first exhibition space.
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HOME & GARDEN
November 30, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
Update: Former MOCA director Jeremy Strick has sold his Westwood-area home for $2,235,000, according to the Multiple Listing Service. The Spanish-style house, with six bedrooms and 4 1/2 bathrooms in 4,327 square feet, was built in 1930. It has two walled courtyards, a step-down living room with a beamed ceiling, a paneled library with built-in bookcases, arched doorways and a covered patio with an outdoor fireplace. There is a swimming pool and spa, a circular driveway and mountain views.
HOME & GARDEN
November 30, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
Update: Former MOCA director Jeremy Strick has sold his Westwood-area home for $2,235,000, according to the Multiple Listing Service. The Spanish-style house, with six bedrooms and 4 1/2 bathrooms in 4,327 square feet, was built in 1930. It has two walled courtyards, a step-down living room with a beamed ceiling, a paneled library with built-in bookcases, arched doorways and a covered patio with an outdoor fireplace. There is a swimming pool and spa, a circular driveway and mountain views.
NEWS
January 28, 2001
How disgraceful that MOCA sees fit to spend $1 million on an advertising campaign by the agency TBWA/Chiat/Day instead of supporting living artists and challenging them to evince interest in MOCA ("In So Many Words," Jan. 4). How oblivious of the museum's new director, Jeremy Strick. This move casts a pall on MOCA's image as a cutting-edge museum--and shows a distinct lack of faith in living artists. One wonders if MOCA is now beholden only to corporate interests and the bottom line instead of being a vibrant, risk-taking institution.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Jeremy Strick, curator of 20th century painting and sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been appointed director of Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art. The announcement, made Monday after a meeting of the museum's board of trustees, is being viewed as a surprising move because it catapults a little-known curator into the top administrative position at one of the nation's highest-profile art institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Eight months into his job as director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Jeremy Strick has decided to close the museum's department of experimental programs, headed by longtime curator Julie Lazar. She and her assistant, Brent Zerger, will leave the museum at the end of the month, Strick said Friday. The decision follows an evaluation of the museum's curatorial structure, Strick said. "This is basically a move to concentrate our programmatic efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
In a pledge that reinforces a philanthropic tradition, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has received the promise of a gift of 33 pieces from Clifford Einstein, chair of MOCA's board of trustees, and his wife, Madeline. The donation comprises works made over the last three decades by an international slate of prominent artists, including Kiki Smith, Nam June Paik, Mark Grotjahn, Sigmar Polke, Mike Kelley and Lari Pittman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
As a leader in the search for a successor to Jeffrey Deitch as director at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Joel Wachs is no newcomer to MOCA. As L.A. City Council president in the early 1980s, he negotiated the long-term lease under which MOCA pays $1 a year to occupy the cavernous city-owned former warehouse and police car repair building in downtown's Little Tokyo that is now known as the Geffen Contemporary. After a remodeling by architect Frank Gehry, it opened in 1983 as MOCA's first exhibition space.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Dylan, Simon Double Bill: Bob Dylan and Paul Simon are teaming up for a summer concert tour in which the acclaimed singer-songwriters are expected to perform at least a couple of songs together during each show, sources confirmed Tuesday. This will be Simon's first tour since 1991, while Dylan has remained almost constantly on the road in recent years, both on his own and in a recent package with Joni Mitchell and Van Morrison.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Jeremy Strick, who led Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art during a nine-year period of vibrant programming and critical acclaim but resigned in December amid a financial crisis that threatened the institution's survival, has been appointed director of the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
In July 1999, when Jeremy Strick emerged from the Art Institute of Chicago's curatorial shadows and stepped into the director's spotlight at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art, he thought he had found a near-perfect opportunity. He had watched from afar as MOCA burst into life in 1979. As it moved into adolescence, he was impressed with its ability to build a collection, exhibition program and international reputation with astonishing speed. "And I loved Los Angeles," he said this week in an interview in his office.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
In a pledge that reinforces a philanthropic tradition, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has received the promise of a gift of 33 pieces from Clifford Einstein, chair of MOCA's board of trustees, and his wife, Madeline. The donation comprises works made over the last three decades by an international slate of prominent artists, including Kiki Smith, Nam June Paik, Mark Grotjahn, Sigmar Polke, Mike Kelley and Lari Pittman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
In the waning days of 1999, Jeremy Strick sat at the round, black, wooden table that dominates his sixth-floor director's office at the Museum of Contemporary Art in downtown Los Angeles and opened a letter stuffed with brilliant portents. The greeting from museum trustee Dallas Price bid him a happy new year and announced that she was giving MOCA $1 million per annum, no strings attached, for the coming 10 years -- the largest cash gift in MOCA's history.
NEWS
January 28, 2001
How disgraceful that MOCA sees fit to spend $1 million on an advertising campaign by the agency TBWA/Chiat/Day instead of supporting living artists and challenging them to evince interest in MOCA ("In So Many Words," Jan. 4). How oblivious of the museum's new director, Jeremy Strick. This move casts a pall on MOCA's image as a cutting-edge museum--and shows a distinct lack of faith in living artists. One wonders if MOCA is now beholden only to corporate interests and the bottom line instead of being a vibrant, risk-taking institution.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
About a year ago, when Jeremy Strick was chosen to be the new director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, skeptics rolled their eyes and crossed their fingers. The problem wasn't his art credentials. Strick is a Harvard University-educated scholar who was curator of 20th century painting and sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago and previously held curatorial positions at two other prestigious institutions, the National Gallery of Art in Washington and the St. Louis Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
In the waning days of 1999, Jeremy Strick sat at the round, black, wooden table that dominates his sixth-floor director's office at the Museum of Contemporary Art in downtown Los Angeles and opened a letter stuffed with brilliant portents. The greeting from museum trustee Dallas Price bid him a happy new year and announced that she was giving MOCA $1 million per annum, no strings attached, for the coming 10 years -- the largest cash gift in MOCA's history.
MAGAZINE
October 17, 1999
When we moved to Los Angeles last June, my family and I spent a week driving here from Chicago. We visited three national parks. Rocky Mountain, pictured, made the greatest impression on me. I stopped at lookout points along the road and just marveled at the scenery. DISCOVERY: There are these hanging gardens in Zion that you get to by hiking along a narrow canyon. A stream runs through the canyon, and the cliff walls extend quite high.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Eight months into his job as director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Jeremy Strick has decided to close the museum's department of experimental programs, headed by longtime curator Julie Lazar. She and her assistant, Brent Zerger, will leave the museum at the end of the month, Strick said Friday. The decision follows an evaluation of the museum's curatorial structure, Strick said. "This is basically a move to concentrate our programmatic efforts.
MAGAZINE
October 17, 1999
When we moved to Los Angeles last June, my family and I spent a week driving here from Chicago. We visited three national parks. Rocky Mountain, pictured, made the greatest impression on me. I stopped at lookout points along the road and just marveled at the scenery. DISCOVERY: There are these hanging gardens in Zion that you get to by hiking along a narrow canyon. A stream runs through the canyon, and the cliff walls extend quite high.
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