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May 18, 2007 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Jeremy Wariner walks with a slouch. He hides his eyes behind dark sunglasses and has a diamond in each ear. He is wearing baggy black shorts that fall below his knees and a T-shirt with the image of Muhammad Ali and the words "I Am The Greatest." The T-shirt is no brag. Wariner is the greatest 400-meter runner in the world right now, the defending Olympic and world champion. His fans call Wariner, 23, affectionately, "The fastest white boy."
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April 26, 2009 | Eddie Pells, Pells writes for the Associated Press.
They were overscheduled, underprepared and outclassed. The American sprint trio of Jeremy Wariner, Allyson Felix and Tyson Gay were favorites in the months leading into the Beijing Olympics, expected to exit the Bird's Nest with lots of gold medals hanging from their necks. Instead, they enter 2009 with a lot to prove because of injuries, training issues and -- oh, yeah -- those lightning-fast Jamaicans. Felix and Wariner left with gold medals, but they were in the 1,600-meter relays -- about the closest thing there is to a gimmie on the Olympic program for Americans.
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July 1, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
EUGENE, Ore. -- It was a shock when Clyde Hart announced five months ago he would no longer be coaching Jeremy Wariner because they couldn't agree on contract terms. Since 2004, Hart had coached Wariner to an Olympic gold medal, two world titles and an NCAA title for Baylor in the 400 meters. He also coached Michael Johnson -- now Wariner's agent -- to world records at 200 and 400 meters that still stand, as well as an unprecedented Olympic gold double in those events.
SPORTS
August 22, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
BEIJING -- LaShawn Merritt left nothing to chance. He broke down video of his 400-meter Olympic semifinal race and video of everyone who would be in the final Thursday night. He studied how Jamaica's Usain Bolt had run the straightaway of his world-record performance in the 200. He made a game plan. "I probably went over the race a million times in my head," Merritt said. One thing had struck the U.S. runner as he watched the video. He saw others had taken fewer steps in the semifinals even though, at 6 feet 3, he was taller.
SPORTS
August 22, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
BEIJING -- LaShawn Merritt left nothing to chance. He broke down video of his 400-meter Olympic semifinal race and video of everyone who would be in the final Thursday night. He studied how Jamaica's Usain Bolt had run the straightaway of his world-record performance in the 200. He made a game plan. "I probably went over the race a million times in my head," Merritt said. One thing had struck the U.S. runner as he watched the video. He saw others had taken fewer steps in the semifinals even though, at 6 feet 3, he was taller.
SPORTS
May 19, 2005 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
They explode out of the blocks as if they are running a 60-meter dash. They fly around curves better than third-leg runners on 400-meter relay teams, and finish races carrying more speed than high hurdlers. They're the 400-meter specialists of the 21st century, elite athletes who've turned track and field's most enervating event into a one-lap sprint.
SPORTS
July 15, 2006 | Chris Foster, Eric Stephens, Ben Bolch, From Times Staff and Wire Reports
World and Olympic champion Jeremy Wariner ran the fourth-fastest 400 meters in history with a time of 43.62 seconds at the Golden Gala meet at Rome on Friday. The eagerly awaited duel in the 400 with fellow American Xavier Carter, who on Tuesday ran the second-fastest 200 meters ever, never materialized when Wariner pulled away heading into the final half, to win by more than a second. In the women's 100, Marion Jones lost for the first time this season, but her time of 10.
SPORTS
July 4, 2008 | Helene Elliott
EUGENE, Ore. -- Jeremy Wariner skipped the traditional victory lap after the men's 400 team was determined Thursday at the U.S. Olympic trials, leaving winner LaShawn Merritt and surprise third-place finisher David Neville to soak up the adulation of the crowd at Hayward Field. Wariner, the 2004 Olympic 400-meter champion and two-time world champion, also skipped the post-race news conference. That left an empty seat next to Merritt and Neville, whose 44 seconds flat and 44.
SPORTS
April 26, 2009 | Eddie Pells, Pells writes for the Associated Press.
They were overscheduled, underprepared and outclassed. The American sprint trio of Jeremy Wariner, Allyson Felix and Tyson Gay were favorites in the months leading into the Beijing Olympics, expected to exit the Bird's Nest with lots of gold medals hanging from their necks. Instead, they enter 2009 with a lot to prove because of injuries, training issues and -- oh, yeah -- those lightning-fast Jamaicans. Felix and Wariner left with gold medals, but they were in the 1,600-meter relays -- about the closest thing there is to a gimmie on the Olympic program for Americans.
SPORTS
July 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeremy Wariner set the year's world-best time in the 400 meters Friday at the Gaz de France Golden League meet in Saint-Denis, France. He finished in 43.86 seconds, outclassing his main rival and fellow American LaShawn Merritt, who was second in 44.35. "I just wanted to come out here and make a statement," said Wariner, the world and Olympic champion. "I did that today. I just got to keep running like I did today and hopefully in the Olympics I'll come out on top."
SPORTS
July 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeremy Wariner set the year's world-best time in the 400 meters Friday at the Gaz de France Golden League meet in Saint-Denis, France. He finished in 43.86 seconds, outclassing his main rival and fellow American LaShawn Merritt, who was second in 44.35. "I just wanted to come out here and make a statement," said Wariner, the world and Olympic champion. "I did that today. I just got to keep running like I did today and hopefully in the Olympics I'll come out on top."
SPORTS
July 4, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
EUGENE, Ore. -- Jeremy Wariner won gold medals at the last Olympics and the last two world championships. That must have led Wariner to figure he was invincible enough in the 400 meters to dump his longtime coach, Clyde Hart, before this season to save money and lose nothing in the deal. It clearly was a miscalculation. Wariner, virtually unbeatable the previous four years, now has lost two straight races to LaShawn Merritt, silver medalist at the 2007 worlds.
SPORTS
July 4, 2008 | Helene Elliott
EUGENE, Ore. -- Jeremy Wariner skipped the traditional victory lap after the men's 400 team was determined Thursday at the U.S. Olympic trials, leaving winner LaShawn Merritt and surprise third-place finisher David Neville to soak up the adulation of the crowd at Hayward Field. Wariner, the 2004 Olympic 400-meter champion and two-time world champion, also skipped the post-race news conference. That left an empty seat next to Merritt and Neville, whose 44 seconds flat and 44.
SPORTS
July 1, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
EUGENE, Ore. -- It was a shock when Clyde Hart announced five months ago he would no longer be coaching Jeremy Wariner because they couldn't agree on contract terms. Since 2004, Hart had coached Wariner to an Olympic gold medal, two world titles and an NCAA title for Baylor in the 400 meters. He also coached Michael Johnson -- now Wariner's agent -- to world records at 200 and 400 meters that still stand, as well as an unprecedented Olympic gold double in those events.
SPORTS
May 18, 2007 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Jeremy Wariner walks with a slouch. He hides his eyes behind dark sunglasses and has a diamond in each ear. He is wearing baggy black shorts that fall below his knees and a T-shirt with the image of Muhammad Ali and the words "I Am The Greatest." The T-shirt is no brag. Wariner is the greatest 400-meter runner in the world right now, the defending Olympic and world champion. His fans call Wariner, 23, affectionately, "The fastest white boy."
SPORTS
May 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
World and Olympic champion Jeremy Wariner led a 1-2 American finish in the men's 400 meters Saturday at the IAAF Japan Grand Prix in Osaka, Japan, defeating Darold Williamson by more than half a second. The 23-year-old Wariner was quick out of the blocks and finished in 44.02 seconds at the warmup to the world championships in August. Williamson finished in 44.68; Australia's Sean Wroe was third in 45.58.
SPORTS
May 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
World and Olympic champion Jeremy Wariner led a 1-2 American finish in the men's 400 meters Saturday at the IAAF Japan Grand Prix in Osaka, Japan, defeating Darold Williamson by more than half a second. The 23-year-old Wariner was quick out of the blocks and finished in 44.02 seconds at the warmup to the world championships in August. Williamson finished in 44.68; Australia's Sean Wroe was third in 45.58.
SPORTS
July 4, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
EUGENE, Ore. -- Jeremy Wariner won gold medals at the last Olympics and the last two world championships. That must have led Wariner to figure he was invincible enough in the 400 meters to dump his longtime coach, Clyde Hart, before this season to save money and lose nothing in the deal. It clearly was a miscalculation. Wariner, virtually unbeatable the previous four years, now has lost two straight races to LaShawn Merritt, silver medalist at the 2007 worlds.
SPORTS
July 15, 2006 | Chris Foster, Eric Stephens, Ben Bolch, From Times Staff and Wire Reports
World and Olympic champion Jeremy Wariner ran the fourth-fastest 400 meters in history with a time of 43.62 seconds at the Golden Gala meet at Rome on Friday. The eagerly awaited duel in the 400 with fellow American Xavier Carter, who on Tuesday ran the second-fastest 200 meters ever, never materialized when Wariner pulled away heading into the final half, to win by more than a second. In the women's 100, Marion Jones lost for the first time this season, but her time of 10.
SPORTS
May 19, 2005 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
They explode out of the blocks as if they are running a 60-meter dash. They fly around curves better than third-leg runners on 400-meter relay teams, and finish races carrying more speed than high hurdlers. They're the 400-meter specialists of the 21st century, elite athletes who've turned track and field's most enervating event into a one-lap sprint.
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