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Jeri Elster

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MAGAZINE
January 27, 2002 | MELBA NEWSOME, Melba Newsome is a freelance writer living in Matthews, N.C
Jeri Elster glances over the top of her glasses from time to time as she plows through her prepared speech. She looks nervous and fragile. Two weeks after completing chemotherapy and radiation treatments for breast cancer, her skin is parched and drawn, her head covered by more fuzz than hair. While her prognosis for a full recovery looks good, it's too early to declare her a cancer survivor. Besides, she's not here to talk about cancer.
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MAGAZINE
January 27, 2002 | MELBA NEWSOME, Melba Newsome is a freelance writer living in Matthews, N.C
Jeri Elster glances over the top of her glasses from time to time as she plows through her prepared speech. She looks nervous and fragile. Two weeks after completing chemotherapy and radiation treatments for breast cancer, her skin is parched and drawn, her head covered by more fuzz than hair. While her prognosis for a full recovery looks good, it's too early to declare her a cancer survivor. Besides, she's not here to talk about cancer.
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NEWS
March 1, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After tearful testimony from two Los Angeles rape victims, legislation to extend indefinitely California's statute of limitations on rape prosecutions cleared a key committee Tuesday. The Assembly Public Safety Committee unanimously approved a bill by Assemblyman Lou Correa (D-Anaheim) that would allow prosecutors to use DNA evidence many years after a rape occurred--a major exemption from California's current six-year statute of limitations on rape cases.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After tearful testimony from two Los Angeles rape victims, legislation to extend indefinitely California's statute of limitations on rape prosecutions cleared a key committee Tuesday. The Assembly Public Safety Committee unanimously approved a bill by Assemblyman Lou Correa (D-Anaheim) that would allow prosecutors to use DNA evidence many years after a rape occurred--a major exemption from California's current six-year statute of limitations on rape cases.
MAGAZINE
February 24, 2002
I'd like to thank Jeri Elster ("The Devil You Know," by Melba Newsome, Jan. 27) for persevering within a justice system that has been functioning in the Dark Ages while alienating and discriminating against women, their bodies and sexual crimes. With her painful story, Elster has opened the door for changes in legislation that can bring justice sooner rather than later for victims of sexual crimes. Maria Velasquez Los Angeles The change in legislation carried by Assemblyman Lou Correa (D-Santa Ana)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the objections of Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley, the region's top police officials approved architectural plans for a new $96-million crime lab Thursday. Cooley urged that staffing planned for firearms and DNA analysis be increased and that the building plans be revised to accommodate the larger staffs. Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca and interim Los Angeles Police Chief Martin Pomeroy said they will work to address Cooley's concerns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2002 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed at the LAPD's destruction of 1,000 untested rape-evidence kits, two Los Angeles City Council members proposed Friday that all such evidence in violent crimes be inventoried and tested for DNA. Normally, detectives give priority to testing evidence when a suspect has been identified because there has not been enough money to test every rape kit. A huge backlog of biological evidence has developed as a result, officials said.
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, Jeri Elster of Los Angeles was bound and brutally raped for hours by a man who broke into her home as she slept. Seven years later, advances in DNA evidence identified the alleged rapist, a man already convicted of an unrelated crime and serving time in a California prison. But under California law, which places a 6-year statute of limitations on rapes, the man will never be tried for the crime because the statute expired before the DNA link was made.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2009 | Maeve Reston
A new campaign mailer from City Councilman Jack Weiss, a city attorney candidate, sparked unusually heated criticism from several of his council colleagues Tuesday with the election just three weeks away. The brochure sent to voters early this month became the source of whispered conversations on the council floor in City Hall as colleagues passed around copies.
NEWS
August 17, 2002 | KAREN R. POMER
Jacqueline Marris and Tamara Brooks are my new heroines. These two brave Southern California teenagers not only acted to survive their ordeal but also made an important decision to speak out on national television after their kidnapping and rape Aug. 1. With the loving support of their families, they performed a great service to rape survivors everywhere by refusing to be shamed into silence. Their act of courage, of course, does not mean that the stigma surrounding rape is fading.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2002 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The revelation that the Los Angeles Police Department mistakenly destroyed evidence in 1,000 unsolved rape cases has ignited a debate about when, if ever, DNA evidence should be thrown out. The disclosure has triggered discussion in the Los Angeles City Council, the Police Commission and among prosecutors, police and victims such as Patti Lancaster.
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