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Jeri Southern

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NEWS
August 6, 1991
A funeral service will be held Friday at 10:30 a.m. at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills for singer and teacher Jeri Southern. Miss Southern was 64 when she died Sunday at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital of pneumonia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The voice of Jeri Southern is a sound that's hard to forget. Southern, who died Sunday of pneumonia--a day before her 65th birthday--came up in an era when there was still a place for her kind of low-key artistry. Both as a pianist and a singer, she could be mesmerizing. Everyone from Frank Sinatra on down knew and raved about her.
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NEWS
August 5, 1991
Jeri Southern, the classically trained pianist who became a jazz-oriented vocalist in the 1950s, died Sunday. Miss Southern, whose 1950s hit "You Better Go Now" proved the most successful of her several recordings, died in a Los Angeles hospital of respiratory complications. She would have been 65 today. Born in Omaha, she began 15 years of classical piano study at age 5 but drifted into popular music, becoming a nightclub performer in Chicago around 1950.
NEWS
August 6, 1991
A funeral service will be held Friday at 10:30 a.m. at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills for singer and teacher Jeri Southern. Miss Southern was 64 when she died Sunday at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital of pneumonia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Pianist and singer David Silverman, who appears three nights a week at the Smoke House in Burbank, is a student of Jeri Southern, who since her own performing days ended in the 1960s has been a busy teacher of piano and voice. Silverman has learned well. His piano, displaying no trace of bebop, steers down the middle of the road. His single-note lines often have an attractive behind-the-beat tendency.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The voice of Jeri Southern is a sound that's hard to forget. Southern, who died Sunday of pneumonia--a day before her 65th birthday--came up in an era when there was still a place for her kind of low-key artistry. Both as a pianist and a singer, she could be mesmerizing. Everyone from Frank Sinatra on down knew and raved about her.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
CHARLIE HADEN "Haunted Heart" Verve * * * Haden's notes tell us that this CD was conceived "as if it were a film telling a story." This may be very clear in Haden's mind, but to some listeners the narrative and continuity will be puzzling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
Murray Grand, a composer, lyricist and pianist best known for his song "Guess Who I Saw Today," has died. He was 87. Grand, a longtime New York City cabaret singer and pianist, died of emphysema March 7 at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, said Barbara Jericiau, a friend. "Guess Who I Saw Today," which he wrote with Elisse Boyd, was introduced by June Carroll in the hit Broadway revue "Leonard Sillman's New Faces of 1952."
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, Bill Kohlhaase is a free-lance writer who regularly covers jazz for the Times Orange County Edition.
As a member of the Manhattan Transfer, Cheryl Bentyne has developed a reputation as a strikingly hip purveyor of jazz, show and bygone pop tunes. So it's no surprise that her first solo album, "Something Cool" (Columbia), is a moody tribute to a generation of singers that includes June Christy, Jeri Southern and Peggy Lee.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
If there were a word to describe the voice of Blossom Dearie, who's at the Tiffany Theater through Monday, it would have to be sopranissimo . But no word or phrase can precisely pin down her special delicacy, the almost childlike grace, fragile on the surface, yet assured enough to bring honesty to every ballad and joy to every jump tune. "I don't want to be called a jazz singer," she says, "though I certainly have some roots there.
NEWS
August 5, 1991
Jeri Southern, the classically trained pianist who became a jazz-oriented vocalist in the 1950s, died Sunday. Miss Southern, whose 1950s hit "You Better Go Now" proved the most successful of her several recordings, died in a Los Angeles hospital of respiratory complications. She would have been 65 today. Born in Omaha, she began 15 years of classical piano study at age 5 but drifted into popular music, becoming a nightclub performer in Chicago around 1950.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Pianist and singer David Silverman, who appears three nights a week at the Smoke House in Burbank, is a student of Jeri Southern, who since her own performing days ended in the 1960s has been a busy teacher of piano and voice. Silverman has learned well. His piano, displaying no trace of bebop, steers down the middle of the road. His single-note lines often have an attractive behind-the-beat tendency.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic.
Only a determined pessimist could claim that the year now reaching its coda was anything less than a salutary one for jazz. The proof was everywhere. Jazz albums, including many priceless reissues, reached reviewers at a rate of about 100 a month. And live performances were easily accessible via clubs, concert halls, festivals, cruises and parties. For the 27th annual Golden Feather Awards, here are a few of the indisputable achievements: Artist of the year: Arturo Sandoval.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The death of Joe Williams last week deprives the jazz world--and the world in general--of one of its most musically masterful voices. More than that, it symbolizes the passing of a generation of artists that sustained the enormous creative energies of the '30s and '40s into the final years of the century. Williams was into his 30s when he had his first big hits--"Ev'ry Day I Have the Blues," "The Comeback," "Alright, Okay, You Win," among others--with the Count Basie Orchestra.
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