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Jericho Israel

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NEWS
September 5, 1994 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The painful process of peacemaking between Israelis and Palestinians has taken a bizarre and potentially dangerous twist in this tiny test-case site for Palestinian self-rule. Since June, Israel has dumped in Jericho about 520 Palestinians released from its prisons. The ex-convicts have been ordered to stay in Jericho until either their sentences expire or Palestinian self-rule is extended to the rest of the West Bank.
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NEWS
March 12, 2000 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Granted, Yasser Arafat said, the visit of Pope John Paul II to the Holy Land later this month was shaping up as an arduous, jampacked journey. But might his holiness consent to add one short stop: Jericho, believed to be the world's oldest inhabited town? Hosting Arafat at the Vatican last month, the pope graciously accepted the invitation. But first he had a question for the Palestinian leader, according to accounts of the meeting circulating here: Where exactly is Jericho?
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NEWS
February 2, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Cursed be the man before the Lord that riseth up and buildeth this city. . . . . --Joshua 6:26. If any of the revelers at the Seven Trees Restaurant on a recent Sunday were aware of Joshua's biblical condemnation, they didn't show it. Young people danced energetically to Middle East favorites played by "The Candles," a university band from Nablus.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | From Associated Press
Israeli archeologists have found what is believed to be the world's oldest synagogue in the ruins of a 2,000-year-old palace outside the West Bank city of Jericho. The synagogue, which dates between 50 BC and 70 BC, was uncovered by archeologists in the ruins of a Maccabean winter palace, archeology professor Ehud Netzer said Sunday. Netzer said worshipers would have sat on a bench running along pillars in the synagogue's basilica-shaped hall.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decision by Palestinian authorities to prevent the distribution of a pro-Jordanian newspaper in Gaza and Jericho raised a storm of protest among editors and opposition figures Friday. In the first instance of overt censorship by the newly formed Palestinian Authority, police seized all issues of An Nahar, a newspaper known for its pro-Jordanian leanings, when they were trucked into Gaza before dawn Thursday.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Palestinian troops on Saturday caught Islamic militants who planned to explode a car bomb at the Allenby Bridge crossing between the West Bank and Jordan, an Israeli security source said. The Israeli army sealed Jericho for most of Saturday, barring motorists from entering and leaving the Palestinian self-rule enclave. The army would not say why it ordered the closure, but the security source said it was to facilitate arrests.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a perceptible moment of silence when Yasser Arafat, the feisty revolutionary who badgered the world into accepting his nation without a state, stepped out of his car, bent down and kissed the hot earth here. Then this hellish outpost of unsettled humanity, beloved of almost no one, erupted in joy as the Palestine Liberation Organization chairman launched his improbable reunion with his people.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat rode Saturday into this sweltering refugee camp that was the birthplace of the Palestinian uprising, calling on his opponents to "come and lift the burden with me" in the struggle for peace. Venturing into the most dangerous territory yet in his rendezvous with an anxious and impoverished homeland, Arafat defended the peace pact with Israel that has spawned a furious opposition campaign by the dozen or more political fronts that operate out of Jabaliya.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 15-member authority was appointed Thursday to become the Palestinians' first government of their own in Jericho and the Gaza Strip, and Palestinian leaders said the new council could assume power with the last Israeli troop withdrawal on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | Associated Press
Israeli and PLO negotiators set aside three issues for further talks after the signing of an accord for limited Palestinian self-rule: PRISONERS: Israel has agreed to free 5,000 of the estimated 8,400 Palestinians it holds in three to four weeks. But Israel has refused to release members of the extremist Hamas movement or Palestinians convicted of killing Israelis. A compromise could permit release of some prisoners who sign a pledge of support for the peace accord.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Palestinian troops on Saturday caught Islamic militants who planned to explode a car bomb at the Allenby Bridge crossing between the West Bank and Jordan, an Israeli security source said. The Israeli army sealed Jericho for most of Saturday, barring motorists from entering and leaving the Palestinian self-rule enclave. The army would not say why it ordered the closure, but the security source said it was to facilitate arrests.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The painful process of peacemaking between Israelis and Palestinians has taken a bizarre and potentially dangerous twist in this tiny test-case site for Palestinian self-rule. Since June, Israel has dumped in Jericho about 520 Palestinians released from its prisons. The ex-convicts have been ordered to stay in Jericho until either their sentences expire or Palestinian self-rule is extended to the rest of the West Bank.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the summer of Jericho's discontent. Shaking off its reputation as a sleepy, sun-scorched desert oasis whose residents are concerned more with farming than with politics, Jericho has emerged as an unexpected focal point of unhappiness with the new Palestinian self-governing authority. Earlier this month, Jericho merchants pulled down the steel doors that shutter their shops and joined a citywide protest against the Palestinian Authority.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decision by Palestinian authorities to prevent the distribution of a pro-Jordanian newspaper in Gaza and Jericho raised a storm of protest among editors and opposition figures Friday. In the first instance of overt censorship by the newly formed Palestinian Authority, police seized all issues of An Nahar, a newspaper known for its pro-Jordanian leanings, when they were trucked into Gaza before dawn Thursday.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat rode Saturday into this sweltering refugee camp that was the birthplace of the Palestinian uprising, calling on his opponents to "come and lift the burden with me" in the struggle for peace. Venturing into the most dangerous territory yet in his rendezvous with an anxious and impoverished homeland, Arafat defended the peace pact with Israel that has spawned a furious opposition campaign by the dozen or more political fronts that operate out of Jabaliya.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a perceptible moment of silence when Yasser Arafat, the feisty revolutionary who badgered the world into accepting his nation without a state, stepped out of his car, bent down and kissed the hot earth here. Then this hellish outpost of unsettled humanity, beloved of almost no one, erupted in joy as the Palestine Liberation Organization chairman launched his improbable reunion with his people.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yasser Arafat, chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization and head of the Palestinians' interim government, Tuesday canceled most of the military orders issued by Israel over its 27-year occupation of the Gaza Strip and this West Bank town.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mahmoud Ata abu Khour went back to jail Monday--a free man, well armed and euphoric--on the day the Gaza Strip all but became a free land. There was no stopping the 35-year-old onetime Palestinian prisoner as he led more than a dozen heavily armed fellow guerrillas through the gate of the central jail here. Abu Khour, a leader of the underground Fatah Hawks resistance and once one of Gaza's most-wanted men, wielded an Uzi submachine gun as he broke into the jail.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, triumphant in his "journey of return" after 27 years of exile, called on Palestinians on Friday to put aside their differences and build "a democratic and free homeland."
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS and KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After weeks of hesitation, PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat announced Wednesday that he will visit the Gaza Strip and West Bank town of Jericho this weekend, a historic return inaugurating the new Palestinian Authority that now governs the regions after 27 years of Israeli occupation. "I am coming!" Arafat excitedly told Nabil Shaath, now the authority's senior minister in the Gaza Strip, in a pre-dawn telephone call from the Tunis, Tunisia, headquarters of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
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