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Jerold Kowalsky

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June 14, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Marcos electronics company on Thursday denied claims by its former president that he was fired in April for his involvement in a U.S. Customs sting operation that foiled an Iraqi conspiracy to obtain nuclear trigger devices. Richard Testut, chief executive of CSI Technologies Inc., said the dismissal of Jerold Kowalsky resulted from "an accumulation of differences of opinion over a long period of time and was by no means connected with his involvement with the Iraqi thing."
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BUSINESS
June 14, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Marcos electronics company on Thursday denied claims by its former president that he was fired in April for his involvement in a U.S. Customs sting operation that foiled an Iraqi conspiracy to obtain nuclear trigger devices. Richard Testut, chief executive of CSI Technologies Inc., said the dismissal of Jerold Kowalsky resulted from "an accumulation of differences of opinion over a long period of time and was by no means connected with his involvement with the Iraqi thing."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990
It's easy to wonder nowadays if there's anything Americans won't do for a buck. This week, however, San Marcos businessman Jerold Kowalsky showed pretty clearly that there is. We're grateful for that--almost as grateful as we are for the fact that he probably kept Iraq from getting the bomb, at least for now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CSI Technologies, a San Marcos electronics firm, Thursday denied that the company's former president had been fired because he aided a government sting operation to prevent Iraqi for obtaining triggering devices for nuclear weapons. Jerold Kowalsky, former CSI president, has claimed the firm feared it would be the target of Iraqi terrorists because he had taken part in sting operation directed by the U.S. Customs Service. Kowalsky was fired in April.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An area businessman who helped U.S. Customs Service investigators foil an Iraqi conspiracy to obtain nuclear trigger devices was fired from his job in April. The executive, Jerold Kowalsky of San Diego, said Wednesday that he believes he lost his job because his company was fearful of Iraqi retaliation. Kowalsky, 58, said "irreconcilable differences" were cited as the cause of his dismissal as president of CSI Technologies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Marcos executive who helped U.S. Customs Service investigators foil an Iraqi conspiracy to obtain nuclear trigger devices was fired in April, The Times has learned, and he said Wednesday that he believes he lost his job because his company was fearful of Iraqi retaliation. Jerold Kowalsky, 58, of Scripps Ranch, said "irreconcilable differences" were cited as the cause of his dismissal as president of CSI Technologies.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL and ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
CSI Technologies of San Marcos had been selling its highly specialized voltage capacitors to the Iraqi government for years, mainly for use in radar and radio transmitters, when company President Jerold Kowalsky sensed something fishy in late summer of 1988. The Iraqis had placed a new order for capacitors, devices that store and concentrate large amounts of electrical power.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL and ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
CSI Technologies of San Marcos had been selling its highly specialized voltage capacitors to the Iraqi government for years, mainly for use in radar and radio transmitters, until president Jerold Kowalsky sensed something fishy in late summer of 1988. That's when the Iraqis placed a new order that requested capacitors built along specifications that suspiciously fit only one product: a nuclear bomb detonator, probably for a missile. Kowalsky had every reason to know.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities accused the Iraqi government Thursday of masterminding an elaborate plot to smuggle electronic devices from California to Baghdad for eventual use in detonating nuclear weapons. Unsealing an indictment by a federal grand jury in San Diego against five alleged agents of the government in Baghdad, officials said they hope to extradite for prosecution in the United States the plot's alleged ringleader, Ali Ashour Daghir, and possibly other participants.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Commerce Department approved millions of dollars in high-technology exports to an Iraqi research center after a classified Pentagon report warned on Nov. 6, 1986, that the nine-acre complex north of Baghdad was secretly developing missiles and weapons of mass destruction, according to government sources familiar with the report.
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