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Jerome A Cohen

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NEWS
September 10, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Unless Prince Norodom Sihanouk of Cambodia severs ties with the Khmer Rouge, the United States should not send arms or humanitarian aid to non-Communist rebel factions affiliated with him, Rep. Chester G. Atkins (D-Mass.) said here Saturday. Speaking at an international symposium on U.S.
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NEWS
September 10, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Unless Prince Norodom Sihanouk of Cambodia severs ties with the Khmer Rouge, the United States should not send arms or humanitarian aid to non-Communist rebel factions affiliated with him, Rep. Chester G. Atkins (D-Mass.) said here Saturday. Speaking at an international symposium on U.S.
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NEWS
October 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The son and friends of an American accused by China of obtaining secrets and paying bribes were not allowed to attend his trial, even though authorities said it would be open, the man's U.S. lawyer said. Fong Fuming, 66, an electrical engineer from West Orange, N.J., went on trial in Beijing on Monday. But lawyer Jerome A. Cohen said one of Fong's sons, who came from Hong Kong, and friends were not allowed to attend the trial.
NEWS
July 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
China has indicted a U.S.-based scholar accused of espionage and will soon try her, probably after a visit by U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, her family's lawyer said Wednesday. Gao Zhan is expected to be tried by the same Beijing court that on Saturday convicted an American business professor, Li Shaomin, of spying for Taiwan and ordered him deported. Gao's trial threatens to cast a cloud over Powell's visit, expected at the end of the month.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro and Barbara Demick
WASHINGTON - After years of detention and a bold escape to the U.S. Embassyin Beijing, blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng arrived in the United States, a bittersweet moment in a harrowing journey that had touched off a diplomatic crisis and poses continued challenges for U.S.-Chinese relations. The human rights leader and his family were whisked quickly and suddenly out of Beijing, as Chen expressed gratitude but also concerns about the safety of the relatives he was leaving behind in China.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III and China's Minister of Justice Zou Yu opened a Sino-American legal conference here Monday with pledges to work for closer economic ties. About 900 Americans, most of them lawyers involved in international trade, gathered with 600 Chinese legal and economic officials in the Great Hall of the People to exchange views on what each country should do to improve the legal framework for trade and investment.
WORLD
December 11, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
New rules quietly adopted in China are likely to have a chilling effect on lawyers who represent political protesters, Human Rights Watch warns in a report being released in Hong Kong today. The report, "A Great Danger for Lawyers," charges that the rule of law in China has been sharply curbed by regulations approved in the spring by the All-China Lawyers Assn., which is in effect the nation's bar association.
WORLD
September 15, 2007 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Zhao Yan, the New York Times researcher imprisoned after the newspaper published an exclusive article about the Chinese leadership, was released Saturday into the arms of friends and family after three years in jail. Zhao, who was detained in a Shanghai restaurant Sept. 17, 2004, and placed under formal arrest three days later, initially was charged with revealing state secrets, which carries a 10-year sentence.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lei Feng is a most unlikely hero. A military man who died in a ridiculous accident, Lei Feng was a naive do-gooder whose highest goal was to be a "rustless screw" in the great machine of communism. His short life, according to official histories, came to an abrupt end in 1962, when one of his comrades backed a truck into a utility pole. Lei, 22, failed to dodge, and the falling pole killed him. An ignominious end? Not at all.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Jerome A. Cohen has devoted most of his life to China. During the past two decades, he has worked as one of the handful of elite lawyers specializing in helping U.S. businesses begin selling, investing or trading inside the Middle Kingdom. Now Cohen has turned to a new interest: Vietnam.
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