Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJerome Charyn
IN THE NEWS

Jerome Charyn

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Paula L. Woods
Whether they're true or not, myths and legends that surround poets help us to see their work in a comprehensible context. Say the names Keats, Poe or Plath, for instance, and images of consumption, drug addiction and mental illness may come to mind, just as the image of 19th century poet Emily Dickinson as an eccentric recluse has persisted largely based on her poetry and a few scraps of biographical information. Slim pickings for a biographical novel, yet the attraction of Dickinson's poetry for Jerome Charyn inspired him to attempt to put flesh on those mythical bones in his novel "The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010
The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson A Novel Jerome Charyn W.W. Norton: 348 pp., $24.95
Advertisement
BOOKS
May 26, 1985 | Richard Eder
Tell me what you throw into the garbage, and I will tell you who you are. Jerome Charyn takes two of the champion wastelands of our time--Vietnam and the grimmer reaches of New York's Lower East Side--and superimposes one upon the other. His purpose, in "War Cries Over Avenue C," is to construct blurred images for blurred times.
BOOKS
February 17, 2008 | Jane Smiley, Jane Smiley is the author of many novels and works of nonfiction.
WHEN you stop to think about it, how many novels about the American Revolution are there, other than Esther Forbes' "Johnny Tremain"? According to the Wikipedia entry "American Revolutionary War Novels," there are five, and I bet you haven't read them. I certainly haven't, and as I was reading "Johnny One-Eye," I began to wonder why there are so few. We know all the names -- Washington, Jefferson, Hamilton, Cornwallis, Betsy Ross.
BOOKS
February 7, 1988 | Roger L. Simon, Simon's next Moses Wine detective novel. "Raising the Dead," will be published in August by Villard Books
When I was a kid, I keep a tiny flashlight under my bed with which to read into the small hours of the morning. In my family, there was no need for this deception if what I were clutching in my furtive 10-year old hands was a weightly tome by Dickens or Balzac. But my secret vice was something else: comics. And like most vices, it was all the more interesting for being forbidden. Of course I knew I was not alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1986
We the undersigned express grave concern over the growing number of political arrests in Poland during the past weeks following the arrest of Zbigniew Bujak, the underground leader of Solidarity. We call for the release of all political prisoners in Poland; in particular, we ask for the release of Zbigniew Lewicki, head of the American literature department of Warsaw University, an eminent scholar, a passionate advocate of American letters and a friend, acquaintance and colleague of many of us. The above letter, drafted at California State University, San Diego, was signed by the following writers and teachers from all over the United States: Walter Abish, John Ashbery, Stanislaw Baranczak, Donald Barthelme, Saul Bellow, Joseph Brodsky, Jerome Charyn, Robert Coover, Marcus Cunliffe, Stephen Dixon, E. L. Doctorow, Raymond Federman, Leslie Fiedler, William Gaddis, William Gass, Allen Ginsberg, Janusz Glowacki, Sinda Gregory, Ihab Hassan, Richard Howard, Irving Howe, John Irving, Harold Jaffe, Frederick R. Karl, Ken Kesey, Jerome Klinkowitz, Larry McCaffery, James McClintock, Joseph McElroy, Norman Mailer, Clarence Major, Peter Matthiessen, Harry Mathews, Leonard Michaels, Arthur Miller, Bradford Morrow, Joyce Carol Oates, Maggie Paley, Walker Percy, Robert Pinsky, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Michael Stephens, Rose Styron, William Styron, Ronald Sukenick, Calvin Tomkins, Frederic Tuten, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Anne Waldman, Paul West .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2003 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
"Broadway lived within an exuberant whirl of energy," writes Jerome Charyn, chronicling the real-life figures of Manhattan's Jazz Age myth, "a signage that lit the night, and a social order that included apartment hotels and rooming houses, delicatessens and vaudeville palaces, nightclubs and cabarets, where one might meet struggling chorines, retired actresses coughing their lungs out in a room that faced a wall, Jack Johnson shadowboxing in some...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2004 | Herbert Gold, Special to The Times
Jerome CHARYN'S dream life must be exceptionally rich. Author of nearly 40 books -- from knowledgeable police novels to picaresque tales of the Bronx, nymphomaniacs and Pinocchio; nonfiction books documenting his fascination with the movies, Broadway and pingpong; memoirs of his immigrant Jewish family; and distinguished short fiction and essays -- he now rewards his readers with "The Green Lantern," subtitled "A Romance of Stalinist Russia."
BOOKS
February 17, 2008 | Jane Smiley, Jane Smiley is the author of many novels and works of nonfiction.
WHEN you stop to think about it, how many novels about the American Revolution are there, other than Esther Forbes' "Johnny Tremain"? According to the Wikipedia entry "American Revolutionary War Novels," there are five, and I bet you haven't read them. I certainly haven't, and as I was reading "Johnny One-Eye," I began to wonder why there are so few. We know all the names -- Washington, Jefferson, Hamilton, Cornwallis, Betsy Ross.
BOOKS
November 25, 2001 | MELVIN JULES BUKIET, Melvin Jules Bukiet is the author, most recently, of "Strange Fire" and the editor of the forthcoming "Nothing Makes You Free: Writings by Descendants of Jewish Holocaust Survivors."
Follow the bouncing ball. No, not the insipid two-dimensional image that floats benignly above the musical notes in "Looney Tunes" but the 2.7-gram three-dimensional sphere that moves so fast across a 9-foot-long forest green table that it practically catches fire. Such tables, once the staple of urban Ping-Pong parlors and suburban basements, now exist--at least in this country--mostly in the mind, especially the mind of novelist Jerome Charyn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2004 | Herbert Gold, Special to The Times
Jerome CHARYN'S dream life must be exceptionally rich. Author of nearly 40 books -- from knowledgeable police novels to picaresque tales of the Bronx, nymphomaniacs and Pinocchio; nonfiction books documenting his fascination with the movies, Broadway and pingpong; memoirs of his immigrant Jewish family; and distinguished short fiction and essays -- he now rewards his readers with "The Green Lantern," subtitled "A Romance of Stalinist Russia."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2003 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
"Broadway lived within an exuberant whirl of energy," writes Jerome Charyn, chronicling the real-life figures of Manhattan's Jazz Age myth, "a signage that lit the night, and a social order that included apartment hotels and rooming houses, delicatessens and vaudeville palaces, nightclubs and cabarets, where one might meet struggling chorines, retired actresses coughing their lungs out in a room that faced a wall, Jack Johnson shadowboxing in some...
BOOKS
November 25, 2001 | MELVIN JULES BUKIET, Melvin Jules Bukiet is the author, most recently, of "Strange Fire" and the editor of the forthcoming "Nothing Makes You Free: Writings by Descendants of Jewish Holocaust Survivors."
Follow the bouncing ball. No, not the insipid two-dimensional image that floats benignly above the musical notes in "Looney Tunes" but the 2.7-gram three-dimensional sphere that moves so fast across a 9-foot-long forest green table that it practically catches fire. Such tables, once the staple of urban Ping-Pong parlors and suburban basements, now exist--at least in this country--mostly in the mind, especially the mind of novelist Jerome Charyn.
NEWS
August 28, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the course of the last four decades, Jerome Charyn has turned his pen to everything from comic strips and children's books to essays on urban life. Most of all, he writes novels.
BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | David Thomson, Thomson is the author of "Suspects" (Alfred A. Knopf) and "Warren Beatty and Desert Eyes" (Vintage). His new novel, "Silver Light," will be published in the spring of 1990 by Knopf. and
Jerome Charyn wants to be very honest about his predicament: "I can say without melodrama, or malice, that Hollywood ruined my life." This is sentence one, Chapter 1, after a prelude that describes the Loew's Paradise, one of the magnificent if absurd movie palaces of the author's youth. This was a Venetian palazzo so serenely out of place in the Bronx that maybe it foresaw the coming destruction of that borough. Beyond the mezzanine there was a plaster "sky" with birds and trees.
BOOKS
February 7, 1988 | Roger L. Simon, Simon's next Moses Wine detective novel. "Raising the Dead," will be published in August by Villard Books
When I was a kid, I keep a tiny flashlight under my bed with which to read into the small hours of the morning. In my family, there was no need for this deception if what I were clutching in my furtive 10-year old hands was a weightly tome by Dickens or Balzac. But my secret vice was something else: comics. And like most vices, it was all the more interesting for being forbidden. Of course I knew I was not alone.
BOOKS
March 8, 1987 | Mark Schorr
It's a tough life for Holden, the hit man. He commits a contract murder, and is forced to adopt a mysterious little girl who witnessed the crime. The denizens of the Cuban underworld, including practitioners of santeria , Cuban voodoo, are leaving him dead roosters as unexplained threats. All the people he trusts--his partner in the fur business, his lawyer, his informants--are betraying him. He's lost his first love to his boss, an elderly, manipulative Swiss.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|