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Jerome Hellman

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Jerome Hellman, the Academy Award-winning producer of such films as "Coming Home" and "Midnight Cowboy," traces his new venture as theater producer back to an evening when he and his wife, photographer Nancy Ellison, were listening to Sting's album ". . . Nothing Like the Sun." They started talking about what a terrific Mack the Knife the rock star would make in "Three Penny Opera."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Jerome Hellman, the Academy Award-winning producer of such films as "Coming Home" and "Midnight Cowboy," traces his new venture as theater producer back to an evening when he and his wife, photographer Nancy Ellison, were listening to Sting's album ". . . Nothing Like the Sun." They started talking about what a terrific Mack the Knife the rock star would make in "Three Penny Opera."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1986
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Academy Foundation will pay tribute to the late screenwriter/direc-tor/producer Nunally Johnson in a special program Dec. 8 at 8 p.m. at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater, 8949 Wilshire Blvd. The program honoring Johnson, whose works include "The Grapes of Wrath," "The Desert Fox," "The Three Faces of Eve" and "The Dirty Dozen," will be hosted by Alistair Cooke.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Hal Ashby has completed the adaptation of Tom Berger's novel "Vital Parts," another in Berger's Carl Reinhart series, which Ashby probably will direct in May with Jerome Hellman producing. Gene Hackman is tentatively set to play Reinhart, a victimized Everyman, who in this installment is down on his luck and tempted to become the first man scientifically frozen and revivified. . . .
NEWS
February 18, 1994 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: Wednesday's screening on its 25th anniversary of United Artists' "Midnight Cowboy" by the American Film Institute's Third Decade Council. A discussion with the filmmakers and a reception followed the screening of the only X-rated film ever to win a Best Picture Oscar. "It's a touching, rather sweet film," said David Hockney. "It tells you something about censors that they would give this an X."
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waldo Salt's life sounds as compelling as one of his Oscar-winning screenplays. At the age of 22, he was a Hollywood up-and-comer. The graduate of Stanford University scored a hit with his first screenplay for the 1938 Margaret Sullavan-James Stewart romance, "Shopworn Angel." The son of a suicidal mother and a right-wing extremist father, Salt was an idealist. The same year "Shopworn Angel" was released, he became a devoted member of the American Communist Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1985 | RODERICK MANN
"I feel so lucky to be in a film about a young person who is real. It's encouraging that someone wanted to show what teen-agers are really like." That's 18-year-old Laura Dern talking, the actress who's been earning plaudits for her work opposite Treat Williams in the new movie "Smooth Talk," which opened Friday. Some people, of course, had already remarked on her talent after seeing her as a blind girl in Peter Bogdanovich's "Mask." "How did you find a blind girl who could act?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1992 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
A well-conceived audio track adds immeasurably to the joy of rediscovering "Midnight Cowboy," a new release from the Criterion Collection (The Voyager Co., CAV full-feature format, digital sound, $80). The 1969 film--directed by the British director John Schlesinger and written by Waldo Salt, based on the James Leo Herlihy novel--comes with an audio track that not only features Schlesinger's observations but also those of producer Jerome Hellman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1994
Regarding "Why Joe Buck and Ratso Live On," by Kenneth Turan (Feb. 20): While Turan's commentary on "Midnight Cowboy" was excellent in its study of that film's significance to the ratings system, like most recent articles I've read on the 25th anniversary of its establishment, it did not accord sufficient blame to the ratings board for its perversion of its original intent and especially that of the X rating. In the mid-'50s, filmmakers began calling for a classification system that would allow them the freedom to deal with "adult" subjects, as their foreign counterparts were doing, without worrying about the films being seen by children.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2005 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
The director was coming off a flop and coming out of the closet. The producer's wife had taken the kids and left him. The screenwriter, whose career had been ruined by the blacklist, was scraping by writing second-rate schlock. The lead actors seemed all wrong for their roles. The Polish cinematographer had never shot a feature before and was learning English as fast as he could.
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