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Jerome Lemelson

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October 3, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerome H. Lemelson, the nation's most prolific contemporary inventor, who held about 500 patents and used profits from his bar code scanner to encourage young inventors, has died. Lemelson was 74. The iconoclastic inventor, who lived in Incline Village, Nev., died Wednesday in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of liver cancer, hospital spokesman Tim Blair said.
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BUSINESS
September 10, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
A U.S. appeals court said the estate of late inventor Jerome Lemelson could no longer enforce bar-code scanning patents that had cost Ford Motor Co., IBM Corp. and other U.S. companies more than $1.3 billion in licensing fees. Lemelson, who died in 1997, spent decades obtaining patents on devices that scan products for price codes, defects and other information. The U.S.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
High Court Lets Stand Reversal of Award Against Mattel: The U.S. Supreme Court let stand a federal appeals court ruling that reversed a $71-million judgment against El Segundo-based Mattel in a patent infringement lawsuit over its popular Hot Wheels line of toy cars. A jury found in 1989 that the track on which Mattel's toy cars traveled infringed on the patent of inventor Jerome Lemelson.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | Adam Goldman, Associated Press Writer
The Story So Far The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued more than 600 patents to Jerome Lemelson. His were drawing-board inventions, but when companies produced products that he felt used his ideas he sued for compensation -- and received more than $1 billion. Then one company, insisting its inventions were original, decided to try to shut down Lemelson's legal machine. * Robert Shillman knew that Ford Motor Co. would never let some skinny, lone inventor take it for millions.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
MIT Gets $6.5-Million Endowment to Spur Invention: Jerome Lemelson, the most prolific living inventor in the United States, set up a $500,000 annual prize--the biggest of its type in the world--to reward U.S. inventors and innovators for their creativity. The prize will be overseen by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as part of a $6.5-million program endowed by Lemelson. The first prize will be awarded early next year. Last year, Lemelson year gave $3.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
A U.S. appeals court said the estate of late inventor Jerome Lemelson could no longer enforce bar-code scanning patents that had cost Ford Motor Co., IBM Corp. and other U.S. companies more than $1.3 billion in licensing fees. Lemelson, who died in 1997, spent decades obtaining patents on devices that scan products for price codes, defects and other information. The U.S.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A prolific inventor who has spent more than a decade proving toys aren't all fun and games has been awarded millions of dollars by a federal jury, which said toy giant Mattel Inc. infringed on his patent with its popular "Hot Wheels." "I am floating on cloud nine," 66-year-old Jerome Lemelson said Friday, a day after the judgment. "My hope is that as a result of it, toy inventors will get a fair shake from the industry." The jury awarded Lemelson $24.
NEWS
August 21, 2005 | Adam Goldman, Associated Press Writer
Jerome H. Lemelson was dying. One of the nation's most prolific and perhaps greatest inventors had been diagnosed with a rare stomach cancer. The disease had spread to his liver, ravaging his body and causing severe pain. In his final days at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in 1997, the 74-year-old Lemelson couldn't eat or drink. Jaundiced and bedridden, he did not complain. He made no special requests. His room was the same as any other patient's. Nor did he brag about his vast accomplishments.
NEWS
August 28, 2005 | Adam Goldman, Associated Press Writer
LAS VEGAS -- The U.S. auto industry denounced Jerome Lemelson's $100-million settlement with Japanese automakers, whom he had accused of infringing on his patent for machine vision -- a breakthrough that helped enable an assembly line of robots. But the Japanese couldn't risk a trial. If they had lost, they could have been barred from exporting cars to the United States. "You weigh your risks," said Frederick Michaud, a patent lawyer who represented the Japanese automakers.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | Adam Goldman, Associated Press Writer
The Story So Far The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued more than 600 patents to Jerome Lemelson. His were drawing-board inventions, but when companies produced products that he felt used his ideas he sued for compensation -- and received more than $1 billion. Then one company, insisting its inventions were original, decided to try to shut down Lemelson's legal machine. * Robert Shillman knew that Ford Motor Co. would never let some skinny, lone inventor take it for millions.
NEWS
August 28, 2005 | Adam Goldman, Associated Press Writer
LAS VEGAS -- The U.S. auto industry denounced Jerome Lemelson's $100-million settlement with Japanese automakers, whom he had accused of infringing on his patent for machine vision -- a breakthrough that helped enable an assembly line of robots. But the Japanese couldn't risk a trial. If they had lost, they could have been barred from exporting cars to the United States. "You weigh your risks," said Frederick Michaud, a patent lawyer who represented the Japanese automakers.
NEWS
August 21, 2005 | Adam Goldman, Associated Press Writer
Jerome H. Lemelson was dying. One of the nation's most prolific and perhaps greatest inventors had been diagnosed with a rare stomach cancer. The disease had spread to his liver, ravaging his body and causing severe pain. In his final days at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in 1997, the 74-year-old Lemelson couldn't eat or drink. Jaundiced and bedridden, he did not complain. He made no special requests. His room was the same as any other patient's. Nor did he brag about his vast accomplishments.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerome H. Lemelson, the nation's most prolific contemporary inventor, who held about 500 patents and used profits from his bar code scanner to encourage young inventors, has died. Lemelson was 74. The iconoclastic inventor, who lived in Incline Village, Nev., died Wednesday in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of liver cancer, hospital spokesman Tim Blair said.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
MIT Gets $6.5-Million Endowment to Spur Invention: Jerome Lemelson, the most prolific living inventor in the United States, set up a $500,000 annual prize--the biggest of its type in the world--to reward U.S. inventors and innovators for their creativity. The prize will be overseen by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as part of a $6.5-million program endowed by Lemelson. The first prize will be awarded early next year. Last year, Lemelson year gave $3.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
High Court Lets Stand Reversal of Award Against Mattel: The U.S. Supreme Court let stand a federal appeals court ruling that reversed a $71-million judgment against El Segundo-based Mattel in a patent infringement lawsuit over its popular Hot Wheels line of toy cars. A jury found in 1989 that the track on which Mattel's toy cars traveled infringed on the patent of inventor Jerome Lemelson.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A prolific inventor who has spent more than a decade proving toys aren't all fun and games has been awarded millions of dollars by a federal jury, which said toy giant Mattel Inc. infringed on his patent with its popular "Hot Wheels." "I am floating on cloud nine," 66-year-old Jerome Lemelson said Friday, a day after the judgment. "My hope is that as a result of it, toy inventors will get a fair shake from the industry." The jury awarded Lemelson $24.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A federal jury ordered toy maker Mattel Inc. to pay millions of dollars to a 66-year-old inventor for infringing on his patent with Mattel's "Hot Wheels" toy car racing system. The jury this week awarded Jerome Lemelson of Princeton, N.J., $24.8 million from Mattel. Under federal law, U.S. District Judge Charles Kocoras could triple the award if he found the patent infringement "willful and deliberate." Lawyers argued that matter before Kocoras on Thursday.
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