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Jerome P Kassirer

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NEWS
January 30, 1991
Dr. Jerome P. Kassirer, a kidney disease specialist at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, has been selected as the new editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, the Massachusetts Medical Society announced Tuesday. Kassirer, 58, will assume his new position, one of the most influential in American medicine, in July. He succeeds Dr. Arnold S. Relman, who will retire after 14 years as the journal's editor.
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NEWS
January 30, 1991
Dr. Jerome P. Kassirer, a kidney disease specialist at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, has been selected as the new editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, the Massachusetts Medical Society announced Tuesday. Kassirer, 58, will assume his new position, one of the most influential in American medicine, in July. He succeeds Dr. Arnold S. Relman, who will retire after 14 years as the journal's editor.
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OPINION
April 12, 2008
Re "Tainted medicine," Opinion, April 6 The reason that efforts by the medical profession to reform its conflicts of interest have been, as Dr. Jerome P. Kassirer describes them, "superficial" is that physicians are allowed to police themselves, unlike in some other professions. Peer review is a sacred cow in the medical community, but it is in need of some major doctoring. Consider the police and the airlines, for example, before outside agencies began to police them. And consider their safety records since they have had parts of their functions placed under the direction of independent agencies.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pill--once a topic seldom discussed in public--is about to be promoted big-time by advertising wizards. Print ads that extol the virtues of the nation's most widely prescribed oral contraceptive will start appearing next week in national consumer magazines, including People, Vogue and Glamour. The ad, by Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp. for its Ortho-Novum 7/7/7, is among the first large-scale national campaigns for a name-brand oral contraceptive.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A major new study of Vitamin A has found that doses only slightly above the maximum recommended levels during the early stages of pregnancy significantly increase the risk of birth defects. The results prompted researchers to recommend that women of childbearing age consume Vitamin A primarily from their diet, along with modest levels in multivitamin supplements.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2008 | Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
A recommendation from an influential doctors group that some children as young as 8 be aggressively treated with cholesterol-lowering drugs has triggered debate over whether there is enough scientific evidence to justify such a move. Statins, already among the most widely prescribed drugs, have been shown to lower the risk of heart disease in certain adults. But there are no comparable long-term studies for children. "We don't know the risks and the benefits," said Dr. Beatrice A.
HEALTH
September 21, 1998
Citing the hazards of poorly tested herbal remedies, a leading medical journal says alternative medicines should be subjected to the same rigorous standards as mainstream treatments. In an editorial in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine, Drs. Marcia Angell and Jerome P. Kassirer argued that testimonials and speculation are no substitute for precise medical evidence that treatments are safe and effective. "There cannot be two kinds of medicine--conventional and alternative," they wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Dr. William B. Schwartz, a renowned kidney disease specialist and researcher who later turned his attention to health policy and began sounding a warning in the 1980s that rising healthcare costs would force America to begin rationing medical care, has died. He was 86. Schwartz, an emeritus professor of medicine at USC, died March 15 at his home in Los Angeles of Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Tressa Ruslander Miller.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
For physicians and public health researchers, guns are not unlike cars, swimming pools, bicycles, alcohol and prescription drugs: They are a common cause of injury to their patients and to the population at large; but with knowledge, physicians and public health experts believe, that injury can be limited or mitigated. It's a perspective that the firearms industry and advocates of gun ownership roundly reject. And, as detailed in three leading medical journals, the gun lobby has been remarkably effective in their efforts to snuff out the notion that when it comes to guns, knowledge can reduce harm.
SCIENCE
April 26, 2007 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 95% of physicians in the U.S. receive free food, beverages, drug samples, sports tickets or other benefits from drug company sales reps eager to influence their prescribing habits, according to a report today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Family practice physicians, who prescribe a broad range of drugs, were more likely to receive visits and gifts from sales reps than other specialist groups involved in the survey, researchers said.
HEALTH
August 6, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
For many Americans, a doctor's decision to prescribe medication is something of a sacred transaction. A physician considers the patient and symptoms and chooses the best drug for the job, drawing upon years of training and clinical experience. It is an exchange conducted in a hushed sanctuary, far from the heat and noise of the marketplace -- a place where cool judgment reigns. That sanctuary has been breached.
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