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Jerome R Porath

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In the watershed years of the late 1960s, a young, Jesuit-educated philosophy major dutifully signed up for a stint as a volunteer teacher in an inner-city Catholic school in St. Louis. He surprised himself by staying to launch a career in education. "I don't know that I ever made a conscious choice" to build a career in parochial schools, "but I wouldn't change any of it now," said Jerome R.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In the watershed years of the late 1960s, a young, Jesuit-educated philosophy major dutifully signed up for a stint as a volunteer teacher in an inner-city Catholic school in St. Louis. He surprised himself by staying to launch a career in education. "I don't know that I ever made a conscious choice" to build a career in parochial schools, "but I wouldn't change any of it now," said Jerome R.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1991
Archbishop Roger M. Mahony has appointed a layman as superintendent of the 101,000-student Catholic school system of the Los Angeles Archdiocese, a post that has always been held by a priest. Jerome R. Porath, who presently has a similar post with the archdiocese of Washington, D.C., will succeed Msgr. Aidan M. Carroll, whose five-year term is ending, on Sept. 1.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | CHARLES SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Team California, a traveling basketball squad laden with L.A. talent, won the 22nd annual Boston Shootout played at Boston Garden. The team, which included UCLA's Toby Bailey, Kris Johnson, omm'A Givens, and USC's Cameron Murray and Cal's Tremaine Fowlkes, was the first California team ever to win the tournament, held July 15-27. Teams from Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New Orleans, New York and Virginia also participated.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Two Catholic high schools in the region have merged--a marriage that has been met with mixed feelings. The consolidation means the all-girl St. Matthias will close and Downey's coeducational Pius X will expand. The merger takes effect in September. Although church officials sought the community's blessings, students, parents, teachers and civic leaders have denounced the decision, which the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles made to save money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anna Hernandez's two children attend Pacoima Elementary, but she dreams of sending them to the family's church school, where they could also receive a religious education. She might get her wish. Like other parents across Los Angeles, Hernandez on Tuesday welcomed the news that Wall Street investor Theodore J. Forstmann was to offer $20 million worth of vouchers--$1,000 each--to help low-income families send their children to private schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Catholic Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization that provides Catholic school tuition to poor families in the Los Angeles area, will award a record $4.5 million in scholarships for the coming school year. The awards will help disadvantaged families send 4,700 children to 227 Catholic elementary and high schools in Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It would be hard to find two Roman Catholic elementary schools that form a more striking contrast than American Martyrs, in the affluent suburb of Manhattan Beach, and Our Lady Help of Christians, in an industrial area northeast of downtown Los Angeles. American Martyrs, spread comfortably over a 10-acre site, is a "parish school" in every sense--the families of all but two of its students live nearby and belong to the church that overlooks its campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Richard Weston was one parent who never thought he would enroll his daughters in a religious school. He didn't trust them. What's more, they scared him. Raised in a nonobservant Jewish household, he worried that his three daughters would be indoctrinated in a strict religious ideology and culture that would drive a wedge between him and his children. "I had nothing of that in my background," he said. "Deep down, I think I was somewhat mistrustful of religion but also afraid that my kids would .
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
How does Pope John Paul II make his message--the promise of a fuller life--relevant to the thousands of young people gathering for his visit here this week when many of them are among the most privileged and well-heeled youths in the world? How does he compete with the daily drumbeat of media messages from motion pictures, music, television, advertising and the printed word that hold out the promise of the good life or promote lifestyles and behavior that are anathema to Catholic teaching?
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