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Jerome R Selmer

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OPINION
December 3, 1989
I was pleased to see your editorial recognition of the joining of the Heye Foundation collection with the Smithsonian. This event is most significant in properly caring for an important part of the collected material culture of our Native American heritage. We are fortunate here in Los Angeles to have in our midst another of the great collections of American Indian art, artifacts and culture. Since 1907, the Southwest Museum has been privileged to care for a magnificent collection which now numbers over 200,000 artifacts; some 150,000 photographic images; 50,000 books; countless original manuscripts and ephemera; and a sound archive which includes 700 original recordings of native music of the Southwest made early in this century.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This morning, the gavel at Christie's New York auction house will fall on Albert Bierstadt's monumental 1864 landscape, "Mount Hood in Oregon." The 6-by-10 foot canvas, which the German immigrant exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial celebration in 1876, establishes a yin and yang of interlocking natural forces: The high, snow-clad peak looms above the deep water of a bowl-like spot along the Columbia River.
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REAL ESTATE
June 4, 1989 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
On Nov. 16, 1911, a staunch little group of notables hacked a trail through the hillside brush above Highland Park, determined to give the new Southwest Museum a proper ground breaking. Shovel in hand, Elizabeth B. Fremont, daughter of Gen. John C. Fremont, dutifully broke the ground and presented the Fremont flag to Charles F. Lummis, the museum's primary founder. Not too many museums are built on a hill, nor do they usually look like castles with a flag flying from its lone turret, but Lummis was a poetic individual and deeply fascinated by the Spanish and native Indian cultures that had influenced the Southwest.
OPINION
December 3, 1989
I was pleased to see your editorial recognition of the joining of the Heye Foundation collection with the Smithsonian. This event is most significant in properly caring for an important part of the collected material culture of our Native American heritage. We are fortunate here in Los Angeles to have in our midst another of the great collections of American Indian art, artifacts and culture. Since 1907, the Southwest Museum has been privileged to care for a magnificent collection which now numbers over 200,000 artifacts; some 150,000 photographic images; 50,000 books; countless original manuscripts and ephemera; and a sound archive which includes 700 original recordings of native music of the Southwest made early in this century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
A retired Los Angeles city personnel executive with no previous museum experience was named Wednesday as the executive director of the Southwest Museum, the prominent American Indian art and history center in Mt. Washington. The museum, which had been without a permanent top officer since November, 1987, appointed Jerome R. Selmer to the new position of executive director, in which he will handle financial and business affairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This morning, the gavel at Christie's New York auction house will fall on Albert Bierstadt's monumental 1864 landscape, "Mount Hood in Oregon." The 6-by-10 foot canvas, which the German immigrant exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial celebration in 1876, establishes a yin and yang of interlocking natural forces: The high, snow-clad peak looms above the deep water of a bowl-like spot along the Columbia River.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Taking Leave: Southwest Museum's Executive Director Jerome R. Selmer has announced he will leave his post June 30. A search committee has already been appointed to name a successor to Selmer, 59, who came to the museum in 1989 after retiring as Los Angeles' assistant city administrative officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1992
It was a twilight moment, above and away from the glare and blare of the city. A middle-aged couple with much to share but little to spend were celebrating their 10th wedding anniversary. He was Chicano, she was Comanche. They had come to the Southwest Museum to hear a concert of American Indian love songs, played that night on a willow flute and sung by a slightly overweight, casually dressed, brown-skinned man who looked, just as they did, as if he had wandered in off the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1988 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
As chief financial officer for the Port of Los Angeles, Rami Furman knows a lot about money. He knows how to invest it, how to manage it and how to budget it. He also knows how to earn it. Just ask any member of the Los Angeles City Council, which broke from tradition this week and voted to give the port's financial czar a 5% raise to $85,629 a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The new man at the Southwest Museum is wide awake. He has heard all the bad news about Los Angeles' riots and earthquakes, the recession's impact on museums and problems he faces as director of the venerable institution in Highland Park. But anthropologist Thomas H. Wilson isn't alarmed; instead, he sees an opportunity.
REAL ESTATE
June 4, 1989 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
On Nov. 16, 1911, a staunch little group of notables hacked a trail through the hillside brush above Highland Park, determined to give the new Southwest Museum a proper ground breaking. Shovel in hand, Elizabeth B. Fremont, daughter of Gen. John C. Fremont, dutifully broke the ground and presented the Fremont flag to Charles F. Lummis, the museum's primary founder. Not too many museums are built on a hill, nor do they usually look like castles with a flag flying from its lone turret, but Lummis was a poetic individual and deeply fascinated by the Spanish and native Indian cultures that had influenced the Southwest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
A retired Los Angeles city personnel executive with no previous museum experience was named Wednesday as the executive director of the Southwest Museum, the prominent American Indian art and history center in Mt. Washington. The museum, which had been without a permanent top officer since November, 1987, appointed Jerome R. Selmer to the new position of executive director, in which he will handle financial and business affairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1999
I enjoyed your "Life Outside the Lines" article (in the "Defining Moments of the 20th Century" issue, Oct. 3) very much. But I believe a few important things were left out (perhaps due to space, etc.). Here are my additions: 1915--Dada movement, which eventually led to Surrealism, etc. 1946--"Progressive jazz" created by Stan Kenton and Pete Rugolo, transforming jazz from dance music to concert music. 1948--Long-playing phonograph records changed the way people listened to music (longer stretches of play)
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