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Jerome Schneider

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BUSINESS
November 21, 2004 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
In U.S. District Court in San Francisco next month, Jerome Schneider is expected to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud the federal government, and then some. In hopes of getting a lighter sentence, Schneider's plea will include a detailed confession to the complicated tax shelter scheme he promoted. Last week, he was even giving reporters a preview.
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BUSINESS
November 21, 2004 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
In U.S. District Court in San Francisco next month, Jerome Schneider is expected to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud the federal government, and then some. In hopes of getting a lighter sentence, Schneider's plea will include a detailed confession to the complicated tax shelter scheme he promoted. Last week, he was even giving reporters a preview.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 1991 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerome N. Schneider, the nation's biggest and most controversial offshore bank promoter, said Tuesday that he is getting out of the business, in part because foreign governments have tightened their banking regulations in the wake of the Bank of Credit & Commerce International scandal. Schneider said WFI, the Beverly Hills company he heads, will be liquidated by the end of the month.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1991 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerome N. Schneider, the nation's biggest and most controversial offshore bank promoter, said Tuesday that he is getting out of the business, in part because foreign governments have tightened their banking regulations in the wake of the Bank of Credit & Commerce International scandal. Schneider said WFI, the Beverly Hills company he heads, will be liquidated by the end of the month.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1991 | JAMES BATES
The newest threat to management guru Tom Peters is . . . Red Auerbach? Next Monday marks the publication of "'MBA," a management tome written by the legendary Boston Celtics president with writer Ken Dooley. (The title stands for "Management by Auerbach). Some of his observations: * On the way some companies take over others: "I can't believe it. They march in like Sherman through Georgia, walking over people, firing and demoting them without even giving them a chance. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2002 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Jerome Schneider, author of "Hiding Your Money," and Los Angeles attorney Eric Witmeyer were indicted Thursday on charges of conspiring to defraud the Internal Revenue Service and of wire and mail fraud. The indictments were the latest volley in redoubled efforts by the IRS to crack down on offshore accounts that the government believes U.S. citizens use to hide billions of dollars in assets and income.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1985 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
The head of UCLA Extension's business and management programs has abruptly canceled a July 11 seminar that was to be run by Jerome Schneider, a 33-year-old Los Angeles offshore bank promoter and head of WFI Corp.. Warren J. Pelton, the UCLA Extension official, disclosed his action last week when a Times reporter called to question him about the university's sponsorship of Schneider's program entitled "Using the 'Switzerlands of the Pacific' for Privacy & Tax Protection."
BUSINESS
November 24, 2004 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
When confessed tax fraud promoter Jerome Schneider handed the Internal Revenue Service a list of his clients, there was at least one well-known name on the roster: actress Sandra Bullock. Bullock, the vivacious star of "Miss Congeniality" and other films, paid Schneider for advice on how to buy an offshore bank, said her attorney, E. Howell Crosby. But, he said, she never cheated on her taxes by moving money overseas.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Six years ago, Jerome N. Schneider was telling a skeptical U.S. Senate subcommittee about the honest workings of the shadowy world of private offshore banks. An example of how it should work, Schneider said, was a bank he had established on the tiny Caribbean island of Montserrat and then sold to J. David Dominelli, an investment adviser who was the toast of San Diego back in 1983. "J. David Banking is used as an intermediary for foreign exchange currency trading to channel investment dollars into the United States in a wholly legitimate manner," said Schneider.
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