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Jerome Siegel

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BUSINESS
March 29, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Time Warner Inc., the world's largest media company, must share control of the Superman copyright with the heirs of the comic hero's creator, Jerome Siegel, a federal judge has ruled. Siegel's widow, Joanne, and their daughter, Laura Larson, won back his half of the copyright to Superman material, under the order this week by U.S. District Judge Stephen Larson in Riverside.
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SCIENCE
July 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unlike all other mammals, bottlenose dolphins and killer whales do not sleep during their first month of life, UCLA researchers reported this week in the journal Nature. Their constant movement reduces the danger from predators and helps maintain the newborn cetaceans' body temperature until they develop greater mass and blubber, said Dr. Jerome Siegel. It also enables them to swim to the surface frequently to breathe and helps their body and brain to develop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California researchers have found a new clue to the cause of narcolepsy, a neurological disorder characterized by intense sleepiness and episodes of cataplexy--an abrupt loss of muscle tone that is often triggered by sudden strong emotions. They have found that cataplexy is caused by the same brain cells that cause loss of muscle tone during so-called "rapid-eye-movement," or REM, sleep. Narcolepsy affects an estimated one in 2,000 people in the United States, a total of more than 125,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1995 | From Times staff reports
A UCLA psychiatrist has found the first clues to the mechanism of narcolepsy, the mysterious sleeping disorder that affects more than 250,000 Americans, causing them to lapse into sleep at inappropriate moments. They also have a characteristic muscle problem called cataplexy, a loss of muscle tone--often leading to collapse--caused by sudden excitement or even laughing. Working with a dog model of the disease, Dr. Jerome M. Siegel found that the first step in the disease is the degeneration of axons, the long, filament-like extensions of nerve cells that make contact with other cells.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | ELSTON CARR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Victor Smith talks about stoves, his eyes brighten, his hands stab the air as if delivering a barbershop sermon and his voice rises a bit no matter how small the audience. A tall, cheerful man who always seems in a rush, the 47-year-old Smith presides over A-1 Stove Hospital, one of the county's largest stove repair yards.
HEALTH
February 3, 2003 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
Brain researchers would like nothing better than to come up with a neat paradigm of how sleep affects memory. It would go something like this: Learning creates chemical changes in specific cells in specific parts of the brain. When a person sleeps shortly after learning, and perhaps especially when she dreams that night, the brain takes these fragile, new memories, shuffles them around into a more permanent home, or at least a more permanent set of neural circuits. And -- presto!
HEALTH
November 5, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Even slightly elevated blood pressure--in the range physicians call high normal--significantly increases the risk of heart disease, a new study has found. Researchers have long known that greater elevations are a significant risk factor for heart disease, but the new study indicates that anything above normal represents some risk.
NEWS
October 27, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
Aerospace pioneer J. Leland Atwood, who we're told is responsible for the design of more flying machines than anyone (among his creations are the P-51 Mustang, the B-25 Mitchell bomber and the F-86 Sabrejet) will receive special kudos from the Los Angeles chapter of the ARCS (Achievement Rewards for College Scientists) Foundation. It will happen Nov. 4 when the local ARCS celebrate another successful year of doing and fund raising with a luncheon in the Music Center's Grand Hall.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
California researchers report that they have found the long-sought cause of narcolepsy, a mysterious sleep disorder that affects at least 125,000 Americans. The condition is caused by the death of a few cells deep within the brain, researchers from UCLA and Stanford report today. The results suggest that it may be possible to treat victims of the disorder, which is characterized by overwhelming sleepiness, and could lead to new ways of attacking other sleep disorders, experts said.
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