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Jerri Lyons

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MAGAZINE
February 6, 2005
'm delighted that you could come to talk," says Jane Hartley, 63, her own voice a spirited croak. Dying of uterine cancer that, despite a hysterectomy and radiation, has metastasized to her lungs, she has been staying for the last several months in a guest house adjacent to her son's home in Sebastopol. She does not have money for a funeral, but in any case does not want one.
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NEWS
December 7, 1998 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soured by seeing grief-ridden friends sold "incredibly expensive" funerals for loved ones, Mike McEligot began shopping when cancer seemed about to kill his father. "I didn't want to wait and do it when my family was vulnerable," said the 44-year-old bank branch manager from Costa Mesa. "It's like having to buy a car when your own car has already broken down."
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soured by seeing grief-ridden friends sold "incredibly expensive" funerals for loved ones, Mike McEligot began shopping when cancer seemed about to kill his father. "I didn't want to wait and do it when my family was vulnerable," said the 44-year-old bank branch manager from Costa Mesa. "It's like having to buy a car when your own car has already broken down."
MAGAZINE
February 6, 2005 | Nancy Rommelmann, Nancy Rommelmann last wrote for the magazine about Microsoft's Smart Home.
For centuries in America, we tended to our dead. People died at home, and relatives prepared the body, laid it out in the parlor and sat by as callers paid final respects. The body was buried in the family cemetery, if there was one, or on the back 40; pieties were spoken, and life went on until the next person died. Death, if not a welcome visitor, was a familiar one.
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