Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJerry Azarkman
IN THE NEWS

Jerry Azarkman

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 1, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, Ron and Jerry Azarkman sold watches and electronic products door to door in the city's Central American enclaves. Seated in the modest living rooms of customers, the Israeli-born brothers began an intimate study of risk and reliability. "[Now] you call it credit. Then, it was 'Take a watch. You have $5? I'll come and pick up another $5 next Friday,"' said Ron Azarkman, chief executive of what eventually became the La Curacao department store chain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 1, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, Ron and Jerry Azarkman sold watches and electronic products door to door in the city's Central American enclaves. Seated in the modest living rooms of customers, the Israeli-born brothers began an intimate study of risk and reliability. "[Now] you call it credit. Then, it was 'Take a watch. You have $5? I'll come and pick up another $5 next Friday,"' said Ron Azarkman, chief executive of what eventually became the La Curacao department store chain.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 4, 2002 | ELENA GAONA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each time any of his friends plan a visit to El Salvador, Henry Aguilar places his to-go order. They better bring him back some chicken or things could get ugly. "Trajiste pollo?" he asks as soon as they return to Los Angeles. "Did you bring chicken?" Everyone knows he's talking about Pollo Campero, fried and rotisserie-style chicken with a loyal following throughout Latin America, especially in El Salvador and Guatemala. "It is the tastiest thing there can be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walk into the Wal-Mart store at Panorama Mall and a greeter is certain to welcome you. But shoppers at the competing La Curacao store across the mall get more than a hello or a buenos dias. There's always festive salsa or merengue music, and on weekends customers can sample free food like pupusas and chuchitos. And the entire orientation of the store is for Latino customers--even the decor, which features stylized Mayan pillars and Aztec pyramids.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | JULIA SCHEERES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This is no ordinary department store. Stylized Mayan pillars and Aztec pyramids adorn the exterior. Inside, merengue and banda music alternate on the loudspeakers and gold-lame Bulova watches emblazoned with the image of the Virgin of Guadalupe fill the jewelry display. Named after a Caribbean island, La Curacao has carved out a loyal niche for itself among the Mexican and Salvadoran immigrants who populate this blue-collar community in the east San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way Frank Fernandez tells it, the once-blighted twin towers that rise above this dreary strip of Pico-Union are the Rome of the Latino business community. All roads lead here, or will soon enough. Fernandez moved to the La Curacao Business Center in December after months of flat sales at the Citadel in Commerce.
OPINION
September 28, 1997 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Pepperdine Institute for Public Policy and the Pacific Research Institute.
Five years ago, Pico-Union burst into public notoriety because it was the scene of widespread rioting following the not-guilty verdicts in the Rodney G. King-beating trial. Even as the embers cooled, academics, the media and political figures proclaimed Pico-Union a "blighted" Latino-flavored dystopia, locked in a hopeless cycle of poverty, economic decline and gang violence. Today, the community of roughly 120,000 just west of downtown remains one of Los Angeles' poorest and most neglected.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|