Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJerry Cadick
IN THE NEWS

Jerry Cadick

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks after his fighter jet smashed into the ground in a crowd-silencing crash before 350,000 horrified onlookers at the El Toro Air Show, Marine Corps pilot Col. Jerry Cadick weakly whispered to those around his hospital bed that one day he would fly again. Everyone nodded sympathetically, but few believed that it would happen. The crash at the air show in April, 1988, crushed Cadick's face, broke his neck in three places and shattered five ribs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks after his fighter jet smashed into the ground in a crowd-silencing crash before 350,000 horrified onlookers at the El Toro Air Show, Marine Corps pilot Col. Jerry Cadick weakly whispered to those around his hospital bed that one day he would fly again. Everyone nodded sympathetically, but few believed that it would happen. The crash at the air show in April, 1988, crushed Cadick's face, broke his neck in three places and shattered five ribs.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1989 | GEORGE FRANK, Times Staff Writer
The familiar sight of a lone Marine Corps F-18 skirting the borders of the El Toro air station, making tight turns, low passes and a giant upside-down loop in front of hundreds of thousands of gaping spectators, will not be a part of this year's Navy Relief Air Show at El Toro. The Marines have decided to cut the stunt from this year's show, which is scheduled for next Saturday and Sunday, because of the near-fatal crash of a lone F-18 during last year's presentation. "I guess the bottom line is I'm not willing to take the chance," said Maj. Gen. Donald E. P. Miller, commander of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing at El Toro.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1989 | GEORGE FRANK, Times Staff Writer
The familiar sight of a lone Marine Corps F-18 skirting the borders of the El Toro air station, making tight turns, low passes and a giant upside-down loop in front of hundreds of thousands of gaping spectators, will not be a part of this year's Navy Relief Air Show at El Toro. The Marines have decided to cut the stunt from this year's show, which is scheduled for next Saturday and Sunday, because of the near-fatal crash of a lone F-18 during last year's presentation. "I guess the bottom line is I'm not willing to take the chance," said Maj. Gen. Donald E. P. Miller, commander of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing at El Toro.
NEWS
April 26, 1988
Marine Corps safety experts launched an investigation into the crash of an F/A-18 jet fighter during a "routine" loop maneuver at an air show in Orange County on Sunday. The condition of the pilot, Marine Col. Jerry Cadick, 45, was upgraded to serious but stable following surgery at Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center in Mission Viejo. Marine spokesman Maj.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1988
Marine Col. Jerry Cadick, 45, a pilot whose jet fighter crashed during an air show at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station two weeks ago, remained in serious but stable condition at Mission Community Hospital, a Marine Corps spokesman said Monday. Cadick's F/A-18 Hornet was completing a loop maneuver when it struck the runway before an estimated 300,000 spectators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1988
The Marine Corps pilot who was pulled from the smoking wreckage of a jet fighter during an air show last month underwent surgery Thursday to repair facial fractures, authorities said. Col. Jerry Cadick's condition has also been upgraded to fair in the intensive care unit of Mission Community Hospital in Mission Viejo, a hospital spokeswoman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989
The 39th Annual Navy Relief Air Show at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station came to a close Sunday afternoon after being viewed by more than half a million people this weekend. Near-perfect weather--with temperatures in the mid-70s and a slight breeze--brought out more than 270,000 people Sunday to watch aerial stunts and precision demonstrations by everything from biplanes to supersonic jets. In a dramatic backdrop for daring feats, most of the day the sun shone through a ring of clouds that formed a rainbow effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1988 | HUGO MARTIN, Times Staff Writer
The Marine Corps colonel who was critically injured while attempting to perform a loop maneuver in his F/A-18 fighter jet when it went down Sunday is a much decorated Vietnam war veteran with over 4,000 hours of flight experience, Marine officials said. Col. Jerry Cadick, a 26-year Marine veteran, is the recipient of numerous awards and citations for his combat flying in Vietnam, including 11 Strike/Flight Air Medals, a Presidential Unit Citation and a Meritorious Unit Commendation, said Sgt.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | BILL BILLITER and RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writers
An estimated 200,000 spectators watched in horror as a supersonic fighter jet crashed Sunday afternoon during an Orange County air show, critically injuring the pilot. None of the huge crowd at the 38th Annual Navy Relief Air Show at the Marine Corps Air Station El Toro were hurt. The pilot of the F/A 18A Hornet, Marine Col. Jerry Cadick, 45, of Evansville, Ind., was taken by military helicopter to Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center in Mission Viejo.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | OTTO STRONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Marine Corps Col. Jerry Cadick's jet slammed into the ground at the El Toro Air Show five years ago, his prognosis was not good. His neck was broken in three places. He had a fractured arm. Five shattered ribs. A crushed vertebra. Two broken legs. Both ankles splintered. Spectators thought he had not survived. Surgeons thought he wouldn't walk. But Cadick always maintained he would return to the cockpit. Six months later, he was flying again.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | BILL BILLITER and RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writers
As about 300,000 spectators watched in horror, a fighter jet crashed Sunday afternoon while giving a solo aerial exhibition at the annual air show at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. The pilot, a much-decorated Vietnam War veteran, was critically injured. The F/A-18 Hornet struck a runway at the Marine base while coming out of a loop, witnesses said. None of the observers at the 38th annual Navy Relief Air Show was hurt. The pilot was Marine Col.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|