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Jerry Coleman

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SPORTS
April 20, 1985 | DAVE DISTEL, Times Staff Writer
When an artist makes a mistake, he slaps some more paint on his easel. When a film director makes a mistake, he leaves it on the cutting room floor. When a waiter makes a mistake, he takes it back to the kitchen. Indeed, I made a mistake in the first paragraph. I misspelled the word "mistake" in the very first sentence. I knew right away it was wrong, so placed the cursor over the offending letter and wiped it off the computer screen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014
Jerry Coleman Longtime announcer for Padres Jerry Coleman, 89, the longtime voice of the San Diego Padres and a former major league ballplayer whose career was interrupted by combat in two wars, died at a hospital Sunday, the team announced. Coleman's baseball career spanned more than 70 years and included sharing in four World Series titles with the New York Yankees. As a Marine Corps pilot, he flew 120 missions in World War II and the Korean War. He received two Distinguished Flying Crosses and retired as a lieutenant colonel.
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NEWS
April 5, 1992 | STEVE HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hi, everybody, this is Jerry Gross. No, it isn't. It's Jerry Coleman. -- The San Diego Padres broadcaster, signing on Ah, the sounds of baseball--the thrilling malaprops, the dramatic nonsequiturs, the breath-taking blown calls. We're talking about broadcasters, of course. And, in these departments, no one can compare to the Padres' Jerry Coleman, the Mets' Ralph Kiner or the Yankees' Phil Rizzuto. For when these three are at the mike, amazing things seem to happen.
SPORTS
August 2, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Coleman, the recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence at the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony Sunday at Cooperstown, N.Y., was typically self-effacing in his acceptance speech. Coleman, a New York Yankee broadcaster before being hired by the San Diego Padres in 1972, recalled once working a Yankee-Cleveland Indian doubleheader. He said he was told that Sam McDowell and Jack Kralick would be pitching for the Indians.
SPORTS
August 2, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Coleman, the recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence at the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony Sunday at Cooperstown, N.Y., was typically self-effacing in his acceptance speech. Coleman, a New York Yankee broadcaster before being hired by the San Diego Padres in 1972, recalled once working a Yankee-Cleveland Indian doubleheader. He said he was told that Sam McDowell and Jack Kralick would be pitching for the Indians.
SPORTS
March 14, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
The popularity of longtime San Diego Padre announcer Jerry Coleman was validated recently when he was named this year's winner of the Ford C. Frick Award, which honors baseball broadcasters. He'll be presented with the award during Hall of Fame weekend this summer at Cooperstown, N.Y. Coleman is so beloved by fans in part because of his verbal missteps. Here is a sampling: * "There's a deep fly ball ... Winfield goes back, back ... his head hits the wall ... it's rolling toward second base."
SPORTS
October 9, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten minutes before the start of Game 2 of the National League playoffs, members of the CBS television crew are tightening their collars. The announcers are preparing to pontificate about the previous night's dramatic finish. The producers are planning replays of that game-winning hit, with tight-angle shots that show elation and despair. Then there is Jerry Coleman of CBS radio. He's not worried.
SPORTS
May 1, 1990 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It wasn't fun, but it was a rewarding experience. That's the way Jerry Coleman looks back at his only season as a baseball manager, a season that was considerably less than a success. As bad as the San Diego Padres were that year, and as quickly as he was relieved of his command when it was over, Coleman is glad he suffered through it. In 1980, Coleman stepped out of the Padres' broadcasting booth to manage the team. In 1981, he went back upstairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014
Jerry Coleman Longtime announcer for Padres Jerry Coleman, 89, the longtime voice of the San Diego Padres and a former major league ballplayer whose career was interrupted by combat in two wars, died at a hospital Sunday, the team announced. Coleman's baseball career spanned more than 70 years and included sharing in four World Series titles with the New York Yankees. As a Marine Corps pilot, he flew 120 missions in World War II and the Korean War. He received two Distinguished Flying Crosses and retired as a lieutenant colonel.
SPORTS
October 27, 2000
Only players in World Series as rookies and in final seasons: 1. Joe DiMaggio in 1936 and 1951 2. Jerry Coleman in 1949 and 1957 3. Gil McDougald in 1951 and 1960 4. Jackie Robinson in 1947 and 1956 5. Jim Gilliam in 1953 and 1966 6. Paul Derringer in 1931 and 1945 7. Willie Mays in 1951 and 1973 * Source: Baseball Digest (February 2000)
SPORTS
March 14, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
The popularity of longtime San Diego Padre announcer Jerry Coleman was validated recently when he was named this year's winner of the Ford C. Frick Award, which honors baseball broadcasters. He'll be presented with the award during Hall of Fame weekend this summer at Cooperstown, N.Y. Coleman is so beloved by fans in part because of his verbal missteps. Here is a sampling: * "There's a deep fly ball ... Winfield goes back, back ... his head hits the wall ... it's rolling toward second base."
SPORTS
October 9, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten minutes before the start of Game 2 of the National League playoffs, members of the CBS television crew are tightening their collars. The announcers are preparing to pontificate about the previous night's dramatic finish. The producers are planning replays of that game-winning hit, with tight-angle shots that show elation and despair. Then there is Jerry Coleman of CBS radio. He's not worried.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | STEVE HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hi, everybody, this is Jerry Gross. No, it isn't. It's Jerry Coleman. -- The San Diego Padres broadcaster, signing on Ah, the sounds of baseball--the thrilling malaprops, the dramatic nonsequiturs, the breath-taking blown calls. We're talking about broadcasters, of course. And, in these departments, no one can compare to the Padres' Jerry Coleman, the Mets' Ralph Kiner or the Yankees' Phil Rizzuto. For when these three are at the mike, amazing things seem to happen.
SPORTS
May 1, 1990 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It wasn't fun, but it was a rewarding experience. That's the way Jerry Coleman looks back at his only season as a baseball manager, a season that was considerably less than a success. As bad as the San Diego Padres were that year, and as quickly as he was relieved of his command when it was over, Coleman is glad he suffered through it. In 1980, Coleman stepped out of the Padres' broadcasting booth to manage the team. In 1981, he went back upstairs.
SPORTS
April 20, 1985 | DAVE DISTEL, Times Staff Writer
When an artist makes a mistake, he slaps some more paint on his easel. When a film director makes a mistake, he leaves it on the cutting room floor. When a waiter makes a mistake, he takes it back to the kitchen. Indeed, I made a mistake in the first paragraph. I misspelled the word "mistake" in the very first sentence. I knew right away it was wrong, so placed the cursor over the offending letter and wiped it off the computer screen.
SPORTS
October 15, 1988
Intelligent and articulate, Dave Campbell adds enjoyment to a Padres game broadcast. The Padres fire him! Jerry Coleman is forgetful (or inattentive), confused and confusing. The Padres rehire him! So now it's audio "off," video and radio "on." And when Mr. Malaprop is all that's offered, I'll get my Padre news from L.A. Times writers. They're media pros. ERWIN L. HERMAN Lake San Marcos
SPORTS
July 11, 1989
WHAT: National League vs. American League WHEN: Today, 5:30 p.m. WHERE: Anaheim Stadium. TV: Channel 4, 36, 39 at 5:30 p.m. Announcers: Vin Scully, Tom Seaver and former President Ronald Reagan. RADIO: KNX 1070 at 5:30 p.m. Announcers: Brent Musberger, Johnny Bench and Jerry Coleman. UMPIRES: Jim Evans (AL), home; Bob Engel (NL), first base; Terry Cooney (AL), second base; Jerry Crawford (NL), third base; John Hirschbeck (AL), left field; Gerry Davis (NL), right field.
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