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Jerry Doggett

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SPORTS
December 5, 1987
I will applaud forever Larry Stewart's recent column on "some things to be thankful for." Not because one or two of the items were the way I feel, but because all of the items were the way I feel. I believe we have a man here who knows his market, especially for appreciating Jerry Doggett's retirement, albeit 15 years too late. HAP TROUT Tehachapi
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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Robert Greene
No, of course one election is not enough. Let's look ahead, ever so slightly. Los Angeles city voters begin selecting their next mayor beginning with mail-in ballots in February. Voting day is March 5. So how did those candidates spend this election day? Jan Perry voted Tuesday morning at 9-ish at Bunker Hill Towers on 1st Street in downtown Los Angeles. Her evening schedule included the Tolliver Barber Shop election night party in South Los Angeles; the Jackie Lacey election night party in Northridge (Lacey is running for district attorney)
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SPORTS
July 12, 1997
Shame on The Times for burying Jerry Doggett on Page 8 of the section. Speaking for thousands of L.A. baby boomers, from 1958 all through the '60s and '70s, no matter what else we were listening to, Jerry Doggett was never less than the second-best announcer in baseball. In those pre-media-glut days, we may not have often heard announcers from other cities, but when we did, we always thought, "Jeez, Doggett's better than that guy. And he's their lead announcer? Poor fill-in-a-city." Jerry, as Bob Hope would say, thanks for the memories.
SPORTS
March 12, 2005
So, the latest spin/damage control/tall tale from Dodger high command is that the off-season's puzzling and depressing maneuvers were really a heroic attempt to keep the Dodger organization (there's an oxymoron for you) steroid-free. I guess that explains their dumping of Ross Porter. Mike Eberts Los Angeles How can I possibly drive to Chavez Ravine and plunk down support in the form of hard-earned cash to this administration? McCourt and DePodesta's mangling of everything Dodger nauseates me. Joey Amalfitano with the San Francisco Giants is disheartening.
SPORTS
September 21, 1987 | SAM McMANIS
Jerry Doggett, who has broadcast Dodger games for 32 seasons in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, announced his retirement on Sunday, effective at the end of this season. Doggett, 71, said he has considered retiring for several years before recently making the decision. The longtime Fullerton resident said he will eventually move to San Jose, where his daughter lives.
SPORTS
September 26, 1987
My heart sank when I read Jerry Doggett is calling it quits at the end of the season. I grew up listening to Jerry and Vin call the games. No one could project the excitement of a thrilling play over the radio better than Jerry. Jerry will be deeply missed. RAY A. GLENDRANGE Los Angeles
SPORTS
October 10, 1987
I was chagrined to learn that the Dodgers have replaced one mediocre announcer, Jerry Doggett, with another, Don Drysdale. Both men have admirable traits, but major league announcing ability is not included among them--unless DD has learned correct English and the ability to announce a game without putting people to sleep since his days with the Angels and on national TV. GARY WOOD Torrance
SPORTS
April 26, 1986
Please tell Jerry Doggett to be more objective, or get a correction for his always rose-colored sunglasses. He told us recently that the Dodger bullpen was off to a great start. At the time, the bullpen had a 7.50 earned-run average and a 0-3 record. Please, Jerry, leave the cheerleading to the fans and get back to good reporting mechanics. NICHOLAS SLAYMAN Pasadena
SPORTS
August 22, 1987
After reading Larry Stewart's column (Aug. 14), my conclusion is that those people in San Francisco are a bunch of wimps! It is true, Ron Fairly is awful behind the microphone. He was awful as second banana with the Angels and I was chagrined to learn he was selected as top gun for the Giant broadcasts. To hear the denizens of Candlestick giving rise to cries of anguish and resentment is laughable, considering Fairly has only been on the job for five months. Good grief, they should endure for nearly 30 years as we Dodger fans have endured Jerry Doggett.
SPORTS
July 9, 1997 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Doggett, who for 32 seasons worked alongside Vin Scully in the Dodger broadcast booth, died Monday of natural causes. He was 80. Doggett retired from broadcasting after the 1987 season, ending the longest-running broadcast partnership ever in baseball. Doggett and Scully remained the best of friends, talking almost weekly. Scully last saw Doggett on June 19, when they had lunch while the Dodgers were in San Francisco. Doggett had lived in Northern California since his retirement.
SPORTS
July 12, 1997
Shame on The Times for burying Jerry Doggett on Page 8 of the section. Speaking for thousands of L.A. baby boomers, from 1958 all through the '60s and '70s, no matter what else we were listening to, Jerry Doggett was never less than the second-best announcer in baseball. In those pre-media-glut days, we may not have often heard announcers from other cities, but when we did, we always thought, "Jeez, Doggett's better than that guy. And he's their lead announcer? Poor fill-in-a-city." Jerry, as Bob Hope would say, thanks for the memories.
SPORTS
July 9, 1997 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Doggett, who for 32 seasons worked alongside Vin Scully in the Dodger broadcast booth, died Monday of natural causes. He was 80. Doggett retired from broadcasting after the 1987 season, ending the longest-running broadcast partnership ever in baseball. Doggett and Scully remained the best of friends, talking almost weekly. Scully last saw Doggett on June 19, when they had lunch while the Dodgers were in San Francisco. Doggett had lived in Northern California since his retirement.
SPORTS
December 5, 1987
I will applaud forever Larry Stewart's recent column on "some things to be thankful for." Not because one or two of the items were the way I feel, but because all of the items were the way I feel. I believe we have a man here who knows his market, especially for appreciating Jerry Doggett's retirement, albeit 15 years too late. HAP TROUT Tehachapi
SPORTS
October 17, 1987
In Larry Stewart's column of October 9, he stated that Vin Scully, Jerry Doggett and Ross Porter worked separately (in a one-at-a-time-format). I, for one, hope that format continues with Don Drysdale. When sportscasters talk to each other in the broadcasting of any game, they are not talking to me, us, the audience. It's as though they're at a game by themselves, watching it and talking to each other. I stopped listening to Bob Starr and Joe Torre (on televised Angel games)
SPORTS
October 10, 1987
I was chagrined to learn that the Dodgers have replaced one mediocre announcer, Jerry Doggett, with another, Don Drysdale. Both men have admirable traits, but major league announcing ability is not included among them--unless DD has learned correct English and the ability to announce a game without putting people to sleep since his days with the Angels and on national TV. GARY WOOD Torrance
SPORTS
September 29, 1987 | LARRY STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The baseball season isn't over yet, and already the Dodgers have made a major deal. They're bringing home Don Drysdale. Only eight days after Jerry Doggett announced that he is retiring after 32 seasons in the Dodgers' broadcast booth, the team announced that Drysdale will replace him. Drysdale, who had his first face-to-face meeting with Dodger President Peter O'Malley last Wednesday, has agreed to terms on a five-year contract.
SPORTS
October 17, 1987
In Larry Stewart's column of October 9, he stated that Vin Scully, Jerry Doggett and Ross Porter worked separately (in a one-at-a-time-format). I, for one, hope that format continues with Don Drysdale. When sportscasters talk to each other in the broadcasting of any game, they are not talking to me, us, the audience. It's as though they're at a game by themselves, watching it and talking to each other. I stopped listening to Bob Starr and Joe Torre (on televised Angel games)
SPORTS
September 26, 1987
My heart sank when I read Jerry Doggett is calling it quits at the end of the season. I grew up listening to Jerry and Vin call the games. No one could project the excitement of a thrilling play over the radio better than Jerry. Jerry will be deeply missed. RAY A. GLENDRANGE Los Angeles
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