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Jerry Dye

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Jerry Dye's act devotes considerable time to exploring what, in his woozy view, is the power of positive drinking. A Southerner with a deep drawl, Jerry Dye followed his favored modus operandi Wednesday at the Laff Stop in Newport Beach: Occasionally juxtaposing his persona of bemused bumpkin against frequent observational offshoots of something he apparently understands thoroughly--boozing. He set up the simpleton stuff immediately.
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NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who covers comedy regularly for O.C. Live!
Veteran comedian Jerry Dye, who speaks in a deep Mississippi drawl, is best known for what has been described as his "rural versus urban, fish-out-of-water" material: observations on, as Dye says on stage, "the crazy things y'all do out here in California that we don't do in Mississippi." Such as the man he saw running one afternoon "for no reason at all." "Fella called it jogging," Dye drawls in his act. "In Mississippi we call that stupidity.
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NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who covers comedy regularly for O.C. Live!
Veteran comedian Jerry Dye, who speaks in a deep Mississippi drawl, is best known for what has been described as his "rural versus urban, fish-out-of-water" material: observations on, as Dye says on stage, "the crazy things y'all do out here in California that we don't do in Mississippi." Such as the man he saw running one afternoon "for no reason at all." "Fella called it jogging," Dye drawls in his act. "In Mississippi we call that stupidity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Jerry Dye's act devotes considerable time to exploring what, in his woozy view, is the power of positive drinking. A Southerner with a deep drawl, Jerry Dye followed his favored modus operandi Wednesday at the Laff Stop in Newport Beach: Occasionally juxtaposing his persona of bemused bumpkin against frequent observational offshoots of something he apparently understands thoroughly--boozing. He set up the simpleton stuff immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1986 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
The crew of Southern California Edison employees kept their design simple but still claimed a world's record Saturday during the United Way's fourth annual sand castle contest at Seal Beach. Slick and tall, with smooth walls, the monolithic sand castle by the 12-member Edison Sand Crew stood 14 feet high, 1 1/2 feet higher than the previous record, they said. Jerry Dye, a meter test analyst from La Verne, said it was supposed to be a "futuristic castle."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1985 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
It's perhaps fitting that Laff Stop's ninth anniversary show tonightwill feature six comics whose names aren't well known outside comedy circles. After all, the opening-night bill also consisted of several then-unknown performers. Said Laff Stop owner Michael Callie: "When we opened in 1976, people's idea of a comedy club was that Bob Hope would come out. Nobody had heard of any of the guys on that first show. The attitude was 'How can you have a comedy club without name performers?'
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
The biggest news--or at least the biggest names--on the Orange County comedy scene this fall evoke a sense of deja vu : Both Jay Leno (who headlines Anaheim's Celebrity Theatre on Nov. 20) and Gallagher (who plays the same venue Dec. 2-3) are returning to the area less than a year after their last local appearances.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | GLENN DOGGRELL, Glenn Doggrell writes about comedy for The Times Orange County Edition.
Much has been made about Henry Cho's unique niche in comedy: He's the only full-blooded Korean working the circuit who was born in Tennessee. He is also very funny, and that's what he prefers to dwell on. Which is why the first thing he does is address his audiences' slack-jawed stares. "Howdy. How y'all doin'?" Cho typically asks a crowd in his opening remarks. "I know what may be going through your mind right now.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO
The idea for the biggest New Year's Eve party ever in Long Beach began when Mum's Ristorante proprietor John Morris glanced up at the downtown clock tower. "I was racking my brain trying to think of some way to get people downtown and I looked up at the tower and thought, 'Why not New Year's Eve?' " Inspired by New York City's Times Square celebration, Morris mentioned his idea to several of his buddy restaurateurs on Pine Avenue. "Everybody loved it," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1988 | JACK MATHEWS, Times San Diego County Arts Editor
It got off to a nice, upbeat start, with Mayor Maureen O'Connor declaring it "The Year of the Arts in San Diego" and promising to bring an international festival that would put San Diego on the cultural map. For a while, enthused members of the arts community had the silly notion that the year of the arts--and the stride toward prominence on the cultural map--might involve them. As it turned out, the mayor had organized a party at which she intended to hog the punch.
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