Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJerry Fairbanks
IN THE NEWS

Jerry Fairbanks

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Fairbanks, the innovative producer who developed the three-camera system for filming television programs during the medium's "live" infancy, has died. He was 90. Fairbanks, whose formal name was Gerald Bertram Fairbanks, died Wednesday in Santa Barbara, where he had lived in retirement since 1983. A filmmaker before he turned to television, Fairbanks won two Academy Awards in the 1940s for film shorts titled "Who's Who in Animal Land" and "Moon Rockets."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Fairbanks, the innovative producer who developed the three-camera system for filming television programs during the medium's "live" infancy, has died. He was 90. Fairbanks, whose formal name was Gerald Bertram Fairbanks, died Wednesday in Santa Barbara, where he had lived in retirement since 1983. A filmmaker before he turned to television, Fairbanks won two Academy Awards in the 1940s for film shorts titled "Who's Who in Animal Land" and "Moon Rockets."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | JON KRAMPNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Krampner is a Los Angeles writer
One of the enduring myths in television history is that the late Desi Arnaz created the three-camera system of filming TV shows for "I Love Lucy." But the three-camera system had well-documented roots in television before "Lucy" premiered 40 years ago this fall. Before the three-camera system, TV shows were re-broadcast by means of kinescopes, poor-quality recordings that were made by pointing a film camera at a TV camera's electronic viewfinder.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | JON KRAMPNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Krampner is a Los Angeles writer
One of the enduring myths in television history is that the late Desi Arnaz created the three-camera system of filming TV shows for "I Love Lucy." But the three-camera system had well-documented roots in television before "Lucy" premiered 40 years ago this fall. Before the three-camera system, TV shows were re-broadcast by means of kinescopes, poor-quality recordings that were made by pointing a film camera at a TV camera's electronic viewfinder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996 | ROBERT A. JONES
Ellis Ring died this month. A case of bad kidneys at 82. In his lifetime, Ellis Ring changed the way Los Angeles looked and changed the way we live in the city. But when he died, he got one paragraph in the paper. Outside his family and friends, nobody much noticed. You could say the same about Phil Anthony, Fritz Burns or Jerry Fairbanks. They all helped create the Los Angeles of the post-World War II years, which is to say Los Angeles as we know it today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Simon, a producer whose pioneering work led to a method for preserving the live quality of early television shows on film, paving the way for summer reruns and the syndication industry, has died. Simon, who had Alzheimer's disease, died Thursday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said his sister-in-law, Ann Rutherford Dozier of Beverly Hills. He was 88.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barnstorming pilots were the daredevil missionaries of aviation's pioneering era, and none of them did more for the cause than Los Angeles' Frank Clarke. He melded two of the world's, and the city's, most promising new technologies: flight and film. In 1920, thousands of Angelenos watched transfixed as the "king of stunt pilots" took wing from the roof of the Railway Building in a Jenny biplane, whose parts he had smuggled up while the building was under construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1999 | DAVID COLKER
My search for Father Bucci, the bootlegging priest of Burbank who made huge religious murals out of postage stamps, began on a Sunday evening when I was half-asleep on my living room sofa. The television was tuned to an all-movies cable channel that was filling time with a 1940s newsreel called "Unusual Occupations." In my woozy state I saw the brief filmed tour of the priest's Burbank bungalow, with its walls and even ceilings covered with his murals. There was a depiction of St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1999 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
My search for Father Bucci--the bootlegging priest of Burbank who made huge religious murals out of postage stamps--began on a Sunday evening when I was half-asleep on my living room sofa. The television was tuned to an all-movies cable channel that was filling time with a 1940s newsreel called, "Unusual Occupations."
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Major royalty always sends Los Angeles atwitter. Now that British Ambassador to the United States Sir Antony Acland has revealed that their royal highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of York (Prince Andrew and his bride, the former Miss Sarah Ferguson), will be coming to town sometime during the U.K./L.A. '88 "A Celebration of British Arts" events, the social calendar is starting to plump.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1985 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Life imitates art, art imitates life and TV always imitates something. This time it's Glenn Frey's recent single "Smuggler's Blues," which has been transformed into an entire upcoming episode of NBC's hit cop show, "Miami Vice." "As soon as I heard the song on the radio, I thought it would make a great show," said executive producer Michael Mann, who hired playwright Miguel Pinero ("Short Eyes") to write the episode, which is scheduled to air Feb. 1.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|