Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJerry Goldsmith
IN THE NEWS

Jerry Goldsmith

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2004 | Jon Thurber and Susan King, Times Staff Writers
Jerry Goldsmith, the Emmy- and Academy Award-winning composer who created memorable scores for films as varied as "Planet of the Apes," "Patton," "Chinatown" and "The Omen," has died. He was 75. Goldsmith died in his sleep Wednesday night at his Beverly Hills home after a long battle with cancer, said Lois Carruth, his longtime personal assistant. During his five-decade career in Hollywood, Goldsmith was prolific and highly sought after.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2004 | Jon Thurber and Susan King, Times Staff Writers
Jerry Goldsmith, the Emmy- and Academy Award-winning composer who created memorable scores for films as varied as "Planet of the Apes," "Patton," "Chinatown" and "The Omen," has died. He was 75. Goldsmith died in his sleep Wednesday night at his Beverly Hills home after a long battle with cancer, said Lois Carruth, his longtime personal assistant. During his five-decade career in Hollywood, Goldsmith was prolific and highly sought after.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1999 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
At the age of 5, Jerry Goldsmith sat in the last row of the Hollywood Bowl, listening to Jascha Heifetz and the Los Angeles Philharmonic play Brahms' violin concerto. This week, he's a lot closer to the action, conducting the Philharmonic in an evening of his own music--scores from such films as "L.A. Confidential" and "Chinatown," TV themes from "The Waltons," and "Dr. Kildare," plus the world premiere of a classical piece commissioned to accompany fireworks and celebrate his 70th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
Even those who aren't die-hard cinephiles know the visage and signature white ponytail of Jerry Goldsmith, for years one of the busiest, and worthiest, film composers in town. Friday at the Hollywood Bowl 10,000 people got to see him in action, making his Bowl debut as a conductor and running through a long set of his music with the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1999
The piece on Jerry Goldsmith by Elaine Dutka is outstanding ("Cue the Composer," Aug. 1). To add a personal memo: A remarkable talent, an intuitive artistic integrity and a profound love for music have characterized Jerry Goldsmith, the man and composer. After 45 gratifying years in his orchestras, we are privileged to affirm that these qualities still flourish in him. MARIE AND DOMINICK FERA Westlake Village
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1999
While James Horner's many scores can usually "fit" a film, they are continually derivative of himself and generally unoriginal ("Film Score King of the World," by Jon Burlingame, Jan. 11). How many times must one be bombarded with "Wrath of Khan" passages in the films he has scored? As for "Film Score King of the World"--it's a deserved toss-up between Jerry Goldsmith and John Williams. BRUCE W. PIVAR Lompoc
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
Even those who aren't die-hard cinephiles know the visage and signature white ponytail of Jerry Goldsmith, for years one of the busiest, and worthiest, film composers in town. Friday at the Hollywood Bowl 10,000 people got to see him in action, making his Bowl debut as a conductor and running through a long set of his music with the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Jerry Goldsmith did not win an Academy Award for his fine score to "L.A. Confidential" on Monday, but he did achieve something else this week that's far harder for a film composer. He had a concert piece played by the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Thursday night under Esa-Pekka Salonen as part of its regular subscription concerts at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. "Music for Orchestra" is not, as had been expected, something brand-new.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1993
On March 5 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, the Society for the Preservation of Film Music honored Jerry Goldsmith--the recipient of 16 Oscar nominations in a career spanning four decades--with its 1993 Career Achievement Award. Among hundreds attending were Joe Dante, Paul Verhoeven, David Raksin, Henry Mancini and Elmer Bernstein. As far as The Times is concerned, this is not worth a line of type. However, we did learn March 8 in a Calendar front-page article accompanied by two color photos that disco is back.
MAGAZINE
September 13, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic and former book-review editor
ELEGANT CARS GLIDING THROUGH A DECAYING infrastructure, the dispossessed huddling in the shadow of bright skyscrapers, the sensation of a dystopian, multiethnic civilization that has managed to simultaneously advance and regress--these are scenes of modern urban decline, and if they make you think of a movie, and chances are they will, it can have only one name: "Blade Runner." Few, if any, motion pictures have the gift of predicting the future as well as crystallizing an indelible image of it, but that is the key to "Blade Runner's" accomplishments.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1999
The piece on Jerry Goldsmith by Elaine Dutka is outstanding ("Cue the Composer," Aug. 1). To add a personal memo: A remarkable talent, an intuitive artistic integrity and a profound love for music have characterized Jerry Goldsmith, the man and composer. After 45 gratifying years in his orchestras, we are privileged to affirm that these qualities still flourish in him. MARIE AND DOMINICK FERA Westlake Village
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1999 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
At the age of 5, Jerry Goldsmith sat in the last row of the Hollywood Bowl, listening to Jascha Heifetz and the Los Angeles Philharmonic play Brahms' violin concerto. This week, he's a lot closer to the action, conducting the Philharmonic in an evening of his own music--scores from such films as "L.A. Confidential" and "Chinatown," TV themes from "The Waltons," and "Dr. Kildare," plus the world premiere of a classical piece commissioned to accompany fireworks and celebrate his 70th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1999
While James Horner's many scores can usually "fit" a film, they are continually derivative of himself and generally unoriginal ("Film Score King of the World," by Jon Burlingame, Jan. 11). How many times must one be bombarded with "Wrath of Khan" passages in the films he has scored? As for "Film Score King of the World"--it's a deserved toss-up between Jerry Goldsmith and John Williams. BRUCE W. PIVAR Lompoc
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Jerry Goldsmith did not win an Academy Award for his fine score to "L.A. Confidential" on Monday, but he did achieve something else this week that's far harder for a film composer. He had a concert piece played by the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Thursday night under Esa-Pekka Salonen as part of its regular subscription concerts at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. "Music for Orchestra" is not, as had been expected, something brand-new.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1993
On March 5 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, the Society for the Preservation of Film Music honored Jerry Goldsmith--the recipient of 16 Oscar nominations in a career spanning four decades--with its 1993 Career Achievement Award. Among hundreds attending were Joe Dante, Paul Verhoeven, David Raksin, Henry Mancini and Elmer Bernstein. As far as The Times is concerned, this is not worth a line of type. However, we did learn March 8 in a Calendar front-page article accompanied by two color photos that disco is back.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1986
I take great exception to Patrick Goldstein's claim that most symphonic film scores sound "hopelessly outdated." Imagine if Jerry Goldsmith's symphonic score was removed from the film "Poltergeist." Who would Goldstein have suggested score the film instead? Prince? What better fit than John Barry's completely traditional score for "Out of Africa"? A concerto for electronic drum machines? Incidentally, while Lionel Newman is an important force in the film music industry, his brother Alfred was responsible for a much larger body of film music.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|