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Jerry Hunt

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
A white glove with a red cross painted on it at the end of a long cloth-covered stick; large wooden cutouts of the letter R scattered throughout a performance space in which a woman speaks and sings in language seemingly from outer space; a wandering performer whose movements cause strange arrays of shapes and sounds to emit from a homemade audio-visual setup. What does it all mean? For performance artists Jerry Hunt and Anna Homler, the meaning isn't important.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
A white glove with a red cross painted on it at the end of a long cloth-covered stick; large wooden cutouts of the letter R scattered throughout a performance space in which a woman speaks and sings in language seemingly from outer space; a wandering performer whose movements cause strange arrays of shapes and sounds to emit from a homemade audio-visual setup. What does it all mean? For performance artists Jerry Hunt and Anna Homler, the meaning isn't important.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1991 | ROBERT M. ANDREWS, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts awarded $47 million in grants to 1,200 artists and arts organizations, including two controversial performers who were denied federal funds last year under an anti-obscenity statute. Grants totaling $35,000 went to two avant-garde theaters in New York for production of new works by Karen Finley and Holly Hughes. Their grant applications last year were rejected at the height of a political controversy over alleged NEA support for obscene and blasphemous art.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1991 | from Associated Press
The National Endowment for the Arts awarded $47 million in grants Friday to 1,200 artists and arts organizations, including two controversial performers who were denied federal funds last year under an anti-obscenity statute. Grants totaling $35,000 went to two avant-garde theaters in New York for production of new works by Karen Finley and Holly Hughes.
FOOD
November 15, 1990 | CHARLES PERRY
A dress stitched together from pieces of flank steak is on display at the Donald Young Gallery in Chicago. Montreal artist Jana Sterbak's creation is slack and sleeveless and looks rather like a daring frock circa 1919, except for a certain lumpy quality in the folds. It has been salted so that in the course of the exhibition it will turn into jerky. Thanks for sharing with us, Jana. The Gastro-Computer Prodigy seems to be the most food-oriented computer information service.
NEWS
June 6, 1987
A new Los Angeles County Grand Jury for 1987-88 was named Friday, a 13-man, 10-woman panel that includes two real estate brokers, a firefighter, an optometrist and 11 retirees. The names of the new panel members were drawn in a brief ceremony in Los Angeles Superior Court by County Clerk Frank S. Zolin. The 23 jurors were selected from a pool of 40 prospective panelists chosen last April from an initial group of 152 nominated by Superior Court judges.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
A select Dutch new music group plays in Zipper Hall of the Colburn School. No one is there to hear it. Does it make a sound? The answer is yes. Marvelous sounds, in fact, the likes of which you wouldn't believe. It isn't completely true that no one was there Monday night for this installment by the Barton Workshop in CalArts Musical Explorations 2000 festival. A dozen of us showed up, an audience precisely double the size of the ensemble.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advisory council of the National Endowment for the Arts voted to approve $155,000 in grants Saturday to two art galleries that sparked an ongoing obscenity debate last year, while postponing a decision on funding for two controversial performance artists in a new dispute over conflict of interest by NEA grant reviewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Any account of the century's great pianists requires the inclusion of David Tudor, who may well have been the most technically astonishing of them all. But that doesn't mean you are likely to find him included in such accounts. And while those who understand the live electronic music Tudor spent his later life gnomically creating might enthusiastically list him among America's most important composers, they are a select few.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
In recent years, the American new-music scene has burgeoned to the point where it no longer operates seasonally, but year-round. Consider these upcoming gatherings of active composers and peripatetic audiences: At the Aspen Music Festival in Colorado, a fifth annual Fromm Week of new music brings three concerts to the altitudinous arts convocation, July 25 through Aug. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts is facing new controversy over proposed grants to performers who were recently denied fellowships. Those awards are part of another developing controversy involving artists who served on an NEA grant review panel that has recommended money for projects in which they are directly involved. One member of an independent commission reviewing the NEA has labeled the endowment's conflict-of-interest policy "a sham."
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