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Jerry Jeff Walker

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
In the 1970s, Jerry Jeff Walker established his credentials as a Texas troubadour and as a confirmed reprobate who wasn't ashamed to come off on stage as a hard-drinking good ol' boy. In the '60s, he had been a wandering folk singer, traveling a course as far from mainstream American career curricula as one could get. He settled in Austin in 1970 and became affiliated with the "Outlaw" movement that set itself apart from country music conventions by adopting rock 'n' roll attitudes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1997 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How many veteran country performers have complained that the biz's powers-that-be ignore artists over 40? Not Jerry Jeff Walker, who plays the Crazy Horse Steak House on Monday with his band, the Gonzo Compadres. He has succeeded on his own terms. Walker and his wife, Susan, formed Tried & True Music in 1986 as an all-purpose business dedicated to furthering his music. The company not only serves as a record label and fan club base but also handles Walker's bookings, publishing and publicity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
However much Frank Sinatra might illuminate a lyric, it is always clear that it is someone else's words he is highlighting. Jerry Jeff Walker, who has the vocal range of a drunk rattlesnake, is a whole other kind of saloon singer, but somehow he is able to bring a personal, revelatory quality to all he touches, whether he wrote it or not.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Let's go to Luckenbach, Texas, with Waylon and Willie and the boys. This successful life we're livin's got us feudin' like the Hatfields and McCoys. Between Hank Williams' pain songs, Jerry Jeff's train songs and 'Blue Eyes Cryin in the Rain,' out in Luckenbach, Texas, there ain't nobody feelin' no pain. --"Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)" sung by Waylon Jennings It's a little far to Luckenbach, so consider yourself lucky: Texas legend Jerry Jeff Walker is coming to you.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
For a man whose performances could once be rated by the number of times he fell over on stage, it was a decidedly more continent Jerry Jeff Walker who performed at the Crazy Horse Steak House on Monday evening. And if Walker may not have flown as wildly as he was reputedly wont during his distilled days, it seemed a worthy compromise that the 47-year-old singer can still convey the atmosphere of a Texas roadhouse party without starring as its chief casualty. Like fellow Austin, Tex.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You'll almost never see an interview with a musician over 40 in which, at some point, the subject doesn't take a few well-aimed shots at the music industry's powers-that-be. There seems to be a pervading sense of victimization, impotence and, ultimately, resignation to some dark conspiracy against veteran recording artists who, fairly or not, feel exploited and abused by the people behind the scenes. Jerry Jeff Walker has been among the most vocal critics of the bigwigs on music row.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Let's go to Luckenbach, Texas, with Waylon and Willie and the boys. This successful life we're livin's got us feudin' like the Hatfields and McCoys. Between Hank Williams' pain songs, Jerry Jeff's train songs and 'Blue Eyes Cryin in the Rain,' out in Luckenbach, Texas, there ain't nobody feelin' no pain. --"Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)" sung by Waylon Jennings It's a little far to Luckenbach, so consider yourself lucky: Texas legend Jerry Jeff Walker is coming to you.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the empire of country music, all roads are supposed to lead to Nashville. Jerry Jeff Walker, however, is content to travel his own byways and stay clear of country music's business hub. Walker, who plays today at the Coach House, has his own cottage industry going in Austin, Tex., his home for the past 20 years. In 1986, Walker and his wife, Susan, launched Tried & True Music, a custom record label that has released his last three albums, including the new "Navajo Rug."
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition
If you were to go looking for the precise opposite of Michael Jackson's bread (lots and lots of bread) and circuses approach to entertainment, you might wind up in a homey bar somewhere, listening to a couple of low-budget, dazzle-free guys like Jerry Jeff Walker and Chris Wall. Walker, the old hand, and Wall, his protege (though not exactly a young one), are a couple of folksy country music troubadours.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1997 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How many veteran country performers have complained that the biz's powers-that-be ignore artists over 40? Not Jerry Jeff Walker, who plays the Crazy Horse Steak House on Monday with his band, the Gonzo Compadres. He has succeeded on his own terms. Walker and his wife, Susan, formed Tried & True Music in 1986 as an all-purpose business dedicated to furthering his music. The company not only serves as a record label and fan club base but also handles Walker's bookings, publishing and publicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You'll almost never see an interview with a musician over 40 in which, at some point, the subject doesn't take a few well-aimed shots at the music industry's powers-that-be. There seems to be a pervading sense of victimization, impotence and, ultimately, resignation to some dark conspiracy against veteran recording artists who, fairly or not, feel exploited and abused by the people behind the scenes. Jerry Jeff Walker has been among the most vocal critics of the bigwigs on music row.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition
If you were to go looking for the precise opposite of Michael Jackson's bread (lots and lots of bread) and circuses approach to entertainment, you might wind up in a homey bar somewhere, listening to a couple of low-budget, dazzle-free guys like Jerry Jeff Walker and Chris Wall. Walker, the old hand, and Wall, his protege (though not exactly a young one), are a couple of folksy country music troubadours.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
However much Frank Sinatra might illuminate a lyric, it is always clear that it is someone else's words he is highlighting. Jerry Jeff Walker, who has the vocal range of a drunk rattlesnake, is a whole other kind of saloon singer, but somehow he is able to bring a personal, revelatory quality to all he touches, whether he wrote it or not.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the empire of country music, all roads are supposed to lead to Nashville. Jerry Jeff Walker, however, is content to travel his own byways and stay clear of country music's business hub. Walker, who plays today at the Coach House, has his own cottage industry going in Austin, Tex., his home for the past 20 years. In 1986, Walker and his wife, Susan, launched Tried & True Music, a custom record label that has released his last three albums, including the new "Navajo Rug."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
For a man whose performances could once be rated by the number of times he fell over on stage, it was a decidedly more continent Jerry Jeff Walker who performed at the Crazy Horse Steak House on Monday evening. And if Walker may not have flown as wildly as he was reputedly wont during his distilled days, it seemed a worthy compromise that the 47-year-old singer can still convey the atmosphere of a Texas roadhouse party without starring as its chief casualty. Like fellow Austin, Tex.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
In the 1970s, Jerry Jeff Walker established his credentials as a Texas troubadour and as a confirmed reprobate who wasn't ashamed to come off on stage as a hard-drinking good ol' boy. In the '60s, he had been a wandering folk singer, traveling a course as far from mainstream American career curricula as one could get. He settled in Austin in 1970 and became affiliated with the "Outlaw" movement that set itself apart from country music conventions by adopting rock 'n' roll attitudes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1989
Austin's Jerry Jeff Walker, forever famous as the composer of "Mr. Bojangles," appears tonight at 7 and 10 at the Crazy Horse Steak House, 1580 Brookhollow Drive, Santa Ana. Tickets: $19.50. Information: (714) 549-1512.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Country singer Jerry Jeff Walker had plane trouble coming into Dallas' Love Field over the weekend. Walker, Danny Britt, his road manager, two members of his band and a pilot were aboard Walker's Piper Navajo when fire broke out in one of the plane's two engines as it was coming into Dallas, where Walker was scheduled to perform at the Longhorn Ballroom. "We lost the engine as we were landing," Britt said. "We landed under one engine, and as we hit the ground we noticed the fire."
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