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Jerry Krause

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NEWS
June 7, 1991 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Krause is easy to spot during the NBA finals. He's the guy getting fitted for a championship ring while ducking the rotten tomatoes his hometown fans are hurling. He's the short, roly-poly man who, somehow, can pass for Twiggy. Life as a chameleon. Or as the Chicago Bulls' vice president of basketball operations, a.k.a. general manager. "I lost 25 pounds the last six weeks," Krause said.
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SPORTS
April 13, 2003 | Mark Heisler
A giant toppled last week, if one who stood only 5 feet 4, when Chicago General Manager Jerry Krause resigned suddenly, citing health reasons, but in fact because owner Jerry Reinsdorf, his patron of 18 years, told him it was (finally) time. By normal standards of conduct, it was past time, not that I'm trying to put a last dart into Krause before he gets out the door, because this gnome with the bared-teeth personality cast a large shadow across the NBA.
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SPORTS
November 22, 1999 | MAL FLORENCE
Jay Mariotti of the Chicago Sun-Times writing on Laker Coach Phil Jackson: "His new followers will learn. They will learn to separate hype from the rim-bending reality that Jackson is just another coach if Shaquille O'Neal can't hit a free throw in the fourth quarter. "For now, in his dynasty postpartum, Let's Do Lunch Phil and his sublime coastal cultists share a dream. They wake up, worship the ocean, breathe the dirty air (?) and believe he will lead the Lakers to an NBA title or two or six.
SPORTS
December 27, 1987 | Associated Press
Chicago Bulls center Artis Gilmore has denied that he asked to be waived from the National Basketball Assn. team. Jerry Krause, the team's vice president for operations, announced Thursday at a news conference that Gilmore asked to leave the team. "Their minds were already made up to release me," Gilmore, 38, said of Krause and Bull Coach Doug Collins.
SPORTS
August 2, 1998 | DAVE KINDRED, THE SPORTING NEWS
Just for the fun of it, see if you can name the man doing the talking in these next few paragraphs. It's January 1990 and he's talking about the great young basketball player named Michael Jordan. "If Michael scores 40 every night, we're not going to win a championship," he says. "To win, we've got to cut down his minutes and keep him fresh. We've got to get him a post man who can score and surround him with shooters.
SPORTS
December 29, 1996 | Mark Heisler
It's that time when our zany cast of characters looks ahead and vows to get it right next year: Michael Jordan--Let's see, 30 days have September, April, June and November, all the rest have 31. . . . OK, 173 more days of Dennis, max. Phil Jackson and Scottie Pippen--Yeah and 173 days of Krause and Reinsdorf and. . . . Jerry Reinsdorf--Next dynasty, I'm definitely getting quieter guys. Jerry Krause--Like Albert Belle, boss? Reinsdorf--Exactamundo.
SPORTS
April 13, 2003 | Mark Heisler
A giant toppled last week, if one who stood only 5 feet 4, when Chicago General Manager Jerry Krause resigned suddenly, citing health reasons, but in fact because owner Jerry Reinsdorf, his patron of 18 years, told him it was (finally) time. By normal standards of conduct, it was past time, not that I'm trying to put a last dart into Krause before he gets out the door, because this gnome with the bared-teeth personality cast a large shadow across the NBA.
SPORTS
March 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Every time Jerry Krause makes one of his unconventional moves, he says he knows his colleagues are thinking "What's the fat little nut done now?" But Krause, a former sportswriter and scout, is doing what he has always wanted--running the Chicago Bulls as owner Jerry Reinsdorf's chief of basketball operations. And quite successfully, as a matter of fact--despite criticism from some quarters. Twelve years ago, he held the same job when the late Arthur Wirtz owned the franchise.
SPORTS
January 14, 1999 | J.A. ADANDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only coach Michael Jordan said he would play for refused to come back. He won't be blamed for the breakup of the Chicago Bulls. Jordan walked away from the team and off into the sunset. He won't be blamed for the breakup of the Chicago Bulls. It appears the only thing that will stay the same around here is the fans' tendency to find fault in everything that owner Jerry Reinsdorf and General Manager Jerry Krause do. Reinsdorf/Krause bashing has always been the companion activity to Jordan worship in this town.
SPORTS
January 14, 1999 | J.A. ADANDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only coach Michael Jordan said he would play for refused to come back. He won't be blamed for the breakup of the Chicago Bulls. Jordan walked away from the team and off into the sunset. He won't be blamed for the breakup of the Chicago Bulls. It appears the only thing that will stay the same around here is the fans' tendency to find fault in everything that owner Jerry Reinsdorf and General Manager Jerry Krause do. Reinsdorf/Krause bashing has always been the companion activity to Jordan worship in this town.
SPORTS
August 2, 1998 | DAVE KINDRED, THE SPORTING NEWS
Just for the fun of it, see if you can name the man doing the talking in these next few paragraphs. It's January 1990 and he's talking about the great young basketball player named Michael Jordan. "If Michael scores 40 every night, we're not going to win a championship," he says. "To win, we've got to cut down his minutes and keep him fresh. We've got to get him a post man who can score and surround him with shooters.
SPORTS
December 29, 1996 | Mark Heisler
It's that time when our zany cast of characters looks ahead and vows to get it right next year: Michael Jordan--Let's see, 30 days have September, April, June and November, all the rest have 31. . . . OK, 173 more days of Dennis, max. Phil Jackson and Scottie Pippen--Yeah and 173 days of Krause and Reinsdorf and. . . . Jerry Reinsdorf--Next dynasty, I'm definitely getting quieter guys. Jerry Krause--Like Albert Belle, boss? Reinsdorf--Exactamundo.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Krause is easy to spot during the NBA finals. He's the guy getting fitted for a championship ring while ducking the rotten tomatoes his hometown fans are hurling. He's the short, roly-poly man who, somehow, can pass for Twiggy. Life as a chameleon. Or as the Chicago Bulls' vice president of basketball operations, a.k.a. general manager. "I lost 25 pounds the last six weeks," Krause said.
SPORTS
March 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Every time Jerry Krause makes one of his unconventional moves, he says he knows his colleagues are thinking "What's the fat little nut done now?" But Krause, a former sportswriter and scout, is doing what he has always wanted--running the Chicago Bulls as owner Jerry Reinsdorf's chief of basketball operations. And quite successfully, as a matter of fact--despite criticism from some quarters. Twelve years ago, he held the same job when the late Arthur Wirtz owned the franchise.
SPORTS
December 27, 1987 | Associated Press
Chicago Bulls center Artis Gilmore has denied that he asked to be waived from the National Basketball Assn. team. Jerry Krause, the team's vice president for operations, announced Thursday at a news conference that Gilmore asked to leave the team. "Their minds were already made up to release me," Gilmore, 38, said of Krause and Bull Coach Doug Collins.
SPORTS
November 22, 1999 | MAL FLORENCE
Jay Mariotti of the Chicago Sun-Times writing on Laker Coach Phil Jackson: "His new followers will learn. They will learn to separate hype from the rim-bending reality that Jackson is just another coach if Shaquille O'Neal can't hit a free throw in the fourth quarter. "For now, in his dynasty postpartum, Let's Do Lunch Phil and his sublime coastal cultists share a dream. They wake up, worship the ocean, breathe the dirty air (?) and believe he will lead the Lakers to an NBA title or two or six.
SPORTS
March 27, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Chicago Bull General Manager Jerry Krause was released from a hospital after treatment for chest pains that doctors attributed to a gastrointestinal problem.
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