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Jerry Mooney

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October 27, 1991 | EDWARD TIVNAN, Edward Tivnan is a former Time magazine staff writer. He has contributed to New York magazine, the New York Times Magazine and the Nation
For 30 years, Jerry Mooney carried around in his head some of America's deepest secrets. His wife, Barbara, followed him to posts in Thailand, Okinawa and Ft. Meade, Md., but never knew exactly what her husband did every day. Mooney had pledged never to reveal anything he worked on or saw, and no one he worked with ever expected the quiet, upright, measured and meticulous Mooney to break that pledge. Ever.
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MAGAZINE
October 27, 1991 | EDWARD TIVNAN, Edward Tivnan is a former Time magazine staff writer. He has contributed to New York magazine, the New York Times Magazine and the Nation
For 30 years, Jerry Mooney carried around in his head some of America's deepest secrets. His wife, Barbara, followed him to posts in Thailand, Okinawa and Ft. Meade, Md., but never knew exactly what her husband did every day. Mooney had pledged never to reveal anything he worked on or saw, and no one he worked with ever expected the quiet, upright, measured and meticulous Mooney to break that pledge. Ever.
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NEWS
January 8, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Assistant Secretary of Defense Richard L. Armitage denied Tuesday that the U.S. government has covered up reports that Americans are still being held prisoner in Indochina. Such allegations, he told a news conference, harm official efforts to determine the fate of about 2,400 Americans still listed as missing in action in the Vietnam War. Armitage headed a U.S. delegation to Hanoi that concluded talks Tuesday with Vietnamese officials on the American MIAs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
July, 1973. It is several months after President Nixon officially welcomed home presumably the last of America's POWs from the Indochina conflict. However, an aerial reconnaissance photo over northern Laos reveals a puzzling message stamped out in tall grass. In 20-foot characters, it says: "1973 TH." In December, 1972, an American C-130 transport carrying Capt. Thomas T. Hart III and 15 others took a direct hit and crashed near the Laotian village of Pakse along the Ho Chi Minh Trail.
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