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Jerry Moss

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BUSINESS
October 13, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alpert, Moss Sign with Geffen Records: Music industry pioneers Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss, founders of A&M Records, signed a pressing and distribution deal with Geffen, with their first three albums expected to be released by mid-1995. The two are returning to the record business with the creation of Almo Sounds. Albums are expected to come from such artists as Angel Corpus Christi, Rake's Progress and Sherree Ford-Payne.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2012 | By Randy Lewis and Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
A&M Records spent much of the 1960s, '70s and '80s as one of the leading independent labels in the music business, buoyed by a remarkably consistent string of hits from superstar acts, beginning with label co-founder Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass and continuing through the Carpenters, Carole King, Cat Stevens, Joe Cocker, Peter Frampton, the Police, Sting, the Go-Go's, Janet Jackson, Bryan Adams and many others. The one thing they had in common: Most weren't superstars when they came to A&M. "We don't sign big names," Gil Friesen, the longtime president of the label founded in 1962 by Alpert and business partner Jerry Moss, told Forbes in 1988.
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BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A&M Founders Said to Be Parting: A&M Records co-founders Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss are close to leaving the Los Angeles-based company, according to published reports. The two executives are said to be dissatisfied with their role under London-based Polygram, which bought A&M for $500 million in 1989. The two executives and A&M declined comment on the reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2007 | Eric Weisbard, Special to The Times
IT might be a 1969 telegram to Australia from a label president unaccustomed to working with openly out-of-control rockers, asking about Joe Cocker's "deportment." Or a letter from a fan irritated that it was not possible, in 1966, to buy tickets in New Jersey for a concert in Queens. A recording studio schedule revealing that crooner Bing Crosby and country rockers the Flying Burrito Brothers were working side by side one March 1970 evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2004 | Mimi Avins
Jerry Moss, co-founder with Herb Alpert of A&M Records, and his wife, Ann, have established a $500,000 scholarship fund at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture. The Moss Scholars Program will support students for the full terms of their education at UCLA -- four years for undergraduates and three for graduate students. UCLArts Dean Christopher Waterman will work with his staff to identify the most qualified candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2012 | By Randy Lewis and Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
A&M Records spent much of the 1960s, '70s and '80s as one of the leading independent labels in the music business, buoyed by a remarkably consistent string of hits from superstar acts, beginning with label co-founder Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass and continuing through the Carpenters, Carole King, Cat Stevens, Joe Cocker, Peter Frampton, the Police, Sting, the Go-Go's, Janet Jackson, Bryan Adams and many others. The one thing they had in common: Most weren't superstars when they came to A&M. "We don't sign big names," Gil Friesen, the longtime president of the label founded in 1962 by Alpert and business partner Jerry Moss, told Forbes in 1988.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1990
Once again, an individual has made a difference ("Film Turns Tide for Dolphins at StarKist Tuna," April 14). Here's to Samuel F. LaBudde, the biologist-photographer, whose painful-to-watch videotape documented the killing of dolphins during tuna fishing operations. And here's especially to Jerry Moss, A&M Records executive, who took it a step further and met at lunch with Anthony J. F. O'Reilly of H. J. Heinz Co., to persuade that firm's top man to boycott tuna at StarKist that had been caught using dolphin-killing methods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | AL MARTINEZ
If you've got better things to do today than read this, do them. March against malathion, trim your trees or baptize the baby. I'll tell you right now, you'll get nothing of significance here. Me and Jerry Moss are tired of significance. We reached that conclusion on Super Bowl Sunday, a day of transcendent divinity equaled only by Easter. He said to me, and I agreed, that there's too damned much significance in the world.
SPORTS
May 8, 2005 | Bill Plaschke
First, the name. You might not believe in the horse, but could you at least correctly pronounce the name? It's "JOCK-oh-mo." Trevor Denman, the esteemed track announcer, has already publicly botched it twice. "We kept sending them notes about it," Dottie Ingardo-Shirreffs, Giacomo's racing manager, said with a sigh. Second, the jockey. He has finally won a Derby in his 12th try, so could you get off his once-broken back? "Honestly, I'm so numb," Mike Smith said after he finished crying.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over salads, Weight Watchers entrees, dry crackers and talk of racehorses, two corporate chieftains met at lunch last December to discuss the fate of the world's dolphins. Two hours later, Jerry Moss, chairman of A & M Records Co., had become a catalyst to Anthony J. F. O'Reilly, chairman, president and chief executive of giant H. J. Heinz Co., who was pondering a change of policy for Heinz's subsidiary, StarKist Seafoods Co., the Long Beach-based tuna canner.
SPORTS
May 8, 2005 | Bill Plaschke
First, the name. You might not believe in the horse, but could you at least correctly pronounce the name? It's "JOCK-oh-mo." Trevor Denman, the esteemed track announcer, has already publicly botched it twice. "We kept sending them notes about it," Dottie Ingardo-Shirreffs, Giacomo's racing manager, said with a sigh. Second, the jockey. He has finally won a Derby in his 12th try, so could you get off his once-broken back? "Honestly, I'm so numb," Mike Smith said after he finished crying.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2004 | Mimi Avins
Jerry Moss, co-founder with Herb Alpert of A&M Records, and his wife, Ann, have established a $500,000 scholarship fund at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture. The Moss Scholars Program will support students for the full terms of their education at UCLA -- four years for undergraduates and three for graduate students. UCLArts Dean Christopher Waterman will work with his staff to identify the most qualified candidates.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seagram's Universal Music Group closed an estimated $400-million deal Wednesday to acquire Rondor Music, the world's leading independent music publishing company, from record industry veterans Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss. Universal, the world's largest record company, beat out Sony and Bertelsmann to land the 60,000-song catalog, which includes classic tunes by Al Green, Otis Redding and the Beach Boys and new hits by Madonna collaborator William Orbit.
SPORTS
July 20, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jaded horseplayers aren't supposed to care, but the sentimental exacta for Monday's season-ending Robert K. Kerlan Memorial Handicap at Hollywood Park would have been Lexicon, owned by Jerry and Ann Moss, and Fearless Pirate, trained by Mike Mitchell. Over the years, no one in the racing game could have been closer to Kerlan, the renowned orthopedic surgeon who died in 1996.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alpert, Moss Sign with Geffen Records: Music industry pioneers Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss, founders of A&M Records, signed a pressing and distribution deal with Geffen, with their first three albums expected to be released by mid-1995. The two are returning to the record business with the creation of Almo Sounds. Albums are expected to come from such artists as Angel Corpus Christi, Rake's Progress and Sherree Ford-Payne.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A&M Founders Said to Be Parting: A&M Records co-founders Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss are close to leaving the Los Angeles-based company, according to published reports. The two executives are said to be dissatisfied with their role under London-based Polygram, which bought A&M for $500 million in 1989. The two executives and A&M declined comment on the reports.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seagram's Universal Music Group closed an estimated $400-million deal Wednesday to acquire Rondor Music, the world's leading independent music publishing company, from record industry veterans Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss. Universal, the world's largest record company, beat out Sony and Bertelsmann to land the 60,000-song catalog, which includes classic tunes by Al Green, Otis Redding and the Beach Boys and new hits by Madonna collaborator William Orbit.
SPORTS
July 20, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jaded horseplayers aren't supposed to care, but the sentimental exacta for Monday's season-ending Robert K. Kerlan Memorial Handicap at Hollywood Park would have been Lexicon, owned by Jerry and Ann Moss, and Fearless Pirate, trained by Mike Mitchell. Over the years, no one in the racing game could have been closer to Kerlan, the renowned orthopedic surgeon who died in 1996.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1990
Once again, an individual has made a difference ("Film Turns Tide for Dolphins at StarKist Tuna," April 14). Here's to Samuel F. LaBudde, the biologist-photographer, whose painful-to-watch videotape documented the killing of dolphins during tuna fishing operations. And here's especially to Jerry Moss, A&M Records executive, who took it a step further and met at lunch with Anthony J. F. O'Reilly of H. J. Heinz Co., to persuade that firm's top man to boycott tuna at StarKist that had been caught using dolphin-killing methods.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over salads, Weight Watchers entrees, dry crackers and talk of racehorses, two corporate chieftains met at lunch last December to discuss the fate of the world's dolphins. Two hours later, Jerry Moss, chairman of A & M Records Co., had become a catalyst to Anthony J. F. O'Reilly, chairman, president and chief executive of giant H. J. Heinz Co., who was pondering a change of policy for Heinz's subsidiary, StarKist Seafoods Co., the Long Beach-based tuna canner.
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