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Jerry Patch

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jerry Patch was named artistic director of the newly launched Sundance Children's Theatre in Utah late last year, the first thing he did was write to more than 100 playwrights with whom he had worked with in his long stint as dramaturge for South Coast Repertory--playwrights who, Patch guessed, probably had never even thought about writing a children's play before.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
When San Diego's Old Globe announced last week that its co-artistic director Jerry Patch had accepted a position as director of artistic development at Manhattan Theatre Club, few may have registered the extent of the theatrical loss to Southern California. For those on alert, the news also carried a faint yet detectable signal of what may be the most insidious problem facing American theater today -- the subtle and not-so-subtle blurring of commercial and nonprofit realms. The issue boils down to procedures, values and, most important, who's in control.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jerry Patch was named artistic director of the newly launched Sundance Children's Theatre in Utah late last year, the first thing he did was write to more than 100 playwrights with whom he had worked with in Costa Mesa in his long stint as dramaturg for South Coast Repertory--playwrights who, Patch guessed, probably had never even thought about writing a children's play before.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994
Jan Herman's article "Getting Their Words' Worth" (Feb. 27) quoted me so as to imply that Craig Lucas' play "Prelude to a Kiss" did not sell as a motion picture because "South Coast is happy to stay in its little corner." To set the record straight, it should be pointed out that other plays such as the Taper's productions of "Children of a Lesser God," "The Shadow Box" and "Angels in America" did not sell until they were subsequently produced in New York, and that has nothing to do with South Coast and quite a lot to do with the low regard producers and studio executives hold for the opinions of Los Angeles theater critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994
Jan Herman's article "Getting Their Words' Worth" (Feb. 27) quoted me so as to imply that Craig Lucas' play "Prelude to a Kiss" did not sell as a motion picture because "South Coast is happy to stay in its little corner." To set the record straight, it should be pointed out that other plays such as the Taper's productions of "Children of a Lesser God," "The Shadow Box" and "Angels in America" did not sell until they were subsequently produced in New York, and that has nothing to do with South Coast and quite a lot to do with the low regard producers and studio executives hold for the opinions of Los Angeles theater critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Good children's plays are hard to come by. That's one reason you see so many Snow Whites and Cinderellas treading the boards. Last spring, though, South Coast Repertory asked its own literary manager, John Glore, to write a play for the Young Conservatory Players, 10-to-17-year-old members of SCR's youth theater training program who put on several shows a year. The result--Glore's refreshingly different "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which a pragmatic little girl named Kimberly-Kay discovered her own imagination by taking a magical journey through three folk tales--was one of the Players' finest offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1991 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paranoia, the feeling that kicks off the madness in "The Russian Teacher" by Soviet playwright Alexander Buravsky, is a key ingredient in many works by American playwright Keith Reddin. That's one reason the play's dramaturge at South Coast Repertory, Jerry Patch, immediately thought of Reddin as a perfect choice to adapt Buravsky's black comedy for American audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
Between phone calls from writers, scenic designers, agents, directors and all the other backstage voices competing for his attention, Jerry Patch reigns over the controlled chaos of his South Coast Repertory office like an air-traffic controller keeping track of a dozen landings at once. If he seems busier than usual it is because that after 13 years as SCR's resident talent scout, whose chief task is to find promising playwrights and help improve their scripts, he is also directing his first production at the theater in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jerry Patch was named artistic director of the newly launched Sundance Children's Theatre in Utah late last year, the first thing he did was write to more than 100 playwrights with whom he had worked with in Costa Mesa in his long stint as dramaturg for South Coast Repertory--playwrights who, Patch guessed, probably had never even thought about writing a children's play before.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jerry Patch was named artistic director of the newly launched Sundance Children's Theatre in Utah late last year, the first thing he did was write to more than 100 playwrights with whom he had worked with in his long stint as dramaturge for South Coast Repertory--playwrights who, Patch guessed, probably had never even thought about writing a children's play before.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1991 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paranoia, the feeling that kicks off the madness in "The Russian Teacher" by Soviet playwright Alexander Buravsky, is a key ingredient in many works by American playwright Keith Reddin. That's one reason the play's dramaturge at South Coast Repertory, Jerry Patch, immediately thought of Reddin as a perfect choice to adapt Buravsky's black comedy for American audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
Between phone calls from writers, scenic designers, agents, directors and all the other backstage voices competing for his attention, Jerry Patch reigns over the controlled chaos of his South Coast Repertory office like an air-traffic controller keeping track of a dozen landings at once. If he seems busier than usual it is because that after 13 years as SCR's resident talent scout, whose chief task is to find promising playwrights and help improve their scripts, he is also directing his first production at the theater in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
When San Diego's Old Globe announced last week that its co-artistic director Jerry Patch had accepted a position as director of artistic development at Manhattan Theatre Club, few may have registered the extent of the theatrical loss to Southern California. For those on alert, the news also carried a faint yet detectable signal of what may be the most insidious problem facing American theater today -- the subtle and not-so-subtle blurring of commercial and nonprofit realms. The issue boils down to procedures, values and, most important, who's in control.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1985
The Irvine Co. has given $15,000 to help underwrite this year's production of "A Christmas Carol" at the South Coast Repertory Theatre in Costa Mesa. SCR's sixth annual version of the Charles Dickens tale will be presented Nov. 30 through Dec. 24 at the Mainstage playhouse. The adaptation is by Jerry Patch, SCR literary manager. Tickets are $12 to $15. Call (714) 957-4033 for box office information.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Good children's plays are hard to come by. That's one reason you see so many Snow Whites and Cinderellas treading the boards. Last spring, though, South Coast Repertory asked its own literary manager, John Glore, to write a play for the Young Conservatory Players, 10-to-17-year-old members of SCR's youth theater training program who put on several shows a year. The result--Glore's refreshingly different "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which a pragmatic little girl named Kimberly-Kay discovered her own imagination by taking a magical journey through three folk tales--was one of the Players' finest offerings.
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