Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJerry Quarry
IN THE NEWS

Jerry Quarry

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 22, 1989 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Normally, a guy making his professional boxing debut is not exactly riding herd over a powerful management group. The fighter's manager tends to be a guy looking only to make a fast buck. And the trainers at that level are nearly always guys with U-turn noses and bad-looking ears who were, dozens of years ago, well on their way to world championships until it was discovered that when another fighter punched them on the chin, they would fall and remain prone for a long time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Boxer Mike Quarry, who died June 11 of pugilistic dementia, will be memorialized Saturday in a public service in the San Joaquin Valley town of Shafter, according to Robert Pearson, Quarry's brother-in-law. Pearson said Quarry, 55, was cremated and his ashes will be interred in Shafter Memorial Park near the grave of his older brother, heavyweight Jerry Quarry.
Advertisement
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | PETE EHRMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Free-lance writer Pete Ehrmann lives in Milwaukee.
One lived in Bellflower, the other in Wilmington. One was Mexican, the other Irish. Both were young heavyweight boxers called by Sports Illustrated "prime candidates" to dethrone Muhammad Ali. Theirs was a great Southern California rivalry with a twist: Jerry Quarry and Joe Orbillo were old friends with no burning desire to meet each other in the ring.
SPORTS
May 1, 1996 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked how long he would continue fighting, Tex Cobb, a notorious bleeder, replied, "As long as they've got the money, I've got the brain cells." Cobb laughed after making the remark. Boxers often use humor as a shield against the reality of their sport. But boxing is no laughing matter. Fighters can suffer brain damage every time they take a blow to the head. And far too often, that damage proves fatal.
SPORTS
October 29, 1995 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jerry Quarry thumps his hard belly with both fists. Smiles at the sound. Like a stone against a tree. "Feel it," he says proudly, punching himself again and again. He pounds big, gnarled fists into meaty palms. Right, left. Right, left. Cocks his head. Stares. Vacant blue eyes. Punch-drunk at 50. Medical name: Dementia pugilistica. Thousands of shots to the head by the best in boxing and, three years ago, the worst.
SPORTS
March 14, 1990
Jerry Quarry, 44, lost a bid for a Nevada boxing license to resume his career. The Nevada State Athletic Commission voted, 3-2, to deny Quarry a license. The commission also rejected a promoter's license for Ram cornerback Leroy Irvin, saying they were concerned about financial accountability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Boxer Mike Quarry, who died June 11 of pugilistic dementia, will be memorialized Saturday in a public service in the San Joaquin Valley town of Shafter, according to Robert Pearson, Quarry's brother-in-law. Pearson said Quarry, 55, was cremated and his ashes will be interred in Shafter Memorial Park near the grave of his older brother, heavyweight Jerry Quarry.
SPORTS
July 25, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY
Jerry Quarry, 45, a heavyweight contender in the 1960s, has applied for a California boxing license, and it is expected that former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes, 40, will soon do the same. Promoter Paul Konapelsky wants to match the two Aug. 30 in Ontario. Quarry, who fought heavyweight champions Floyd Patterson, Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, has completed his license application and passed the neurological examination required of California boxers. Holmes has not applied.
SPORTS
October 31, 1995 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, Jerry Quarry was the bull from Bellflower, a young, bright, heavyweight contender who could string punches and sentences together. These days, he can do neither. Quarry, 50, lives in a far-off world under round-the-clock care. Quarry, who fought and lost to some of the best--Muhammad Ali, twice; Joe Frazier, Ken Norton--suffers from pugilistica dementia. In the old days you would have called him punch drunk.
SPORTS
May 25, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A newly created boxing panel has advised the state to reject a request to allow former heavyweight Jerry Quarry to return to the ring at age 45. Marlene A. Cummings, secretary of the Department of Regulation and Licensing, said she was leaning strongly toward accepting the panel's recommendation. The boxing panel was formed this week at the request of Gov. Tommy G. Thompson in the aftermath of a dispute over former junior welterweight champion Aaron Pryor's return to the ring last week.
SPORTS
October 31, 1995 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, Jerry Quarry was the bull from Bellflower, a young, bright, heavyweight contender who could string punches and sentences together. These days, he can do neither. Quarry, 50, lives in a far-off world under round-the-clock care. Quarry, who fought and lost to some of the best--Muhammad Ali, twice; Joe Frazier, Ken Norton--suffers from pugilistica dementia. In the old days you would have called him punch drunk.
SPORTS
October 29, 1995 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jerry Quarry thumps his hard belly with both fists. Smiles at the sound. Like a stone against a tree. "Feel it," he says proudly, punching himself again and again. He pounds big, gnarled fists into meaty palms. Right, left. Right, left. Cocks his head. Stares. Vacant blue eyes. Punch-drunk at 50. Medical name: Dementia pugilistica. Thousands of shots to the head by the best in boxing and, three years ago, the worst.
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | PETE EHRMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Free-lance writer Pete Ehrmann lives in Milwaukee.
One lived in Bellflower, the other in Wilmington. One was Mexican, the other Irish. Both were young heavyweight boxers called by Sports Illustrated "prime candidates" to dethrone Muhammad Ali. Theirs was a great Southern California rivalry with a twist: Jerry Quarry and Joe Orbillo were old friends with no burning desire to meet each other in the ring.
SPORTS
September 22, 1990 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Athletic Commission voted unanimously Friday to deny former heavyweight contender Jerry Quarry a boxing license. Quarry, 45, must wait a year before reapplying. If Quarry, who has not fought in seven years, had been granted a license, he would have tried to arrange a bout against former heavyweight champion George Foreman, 42. Quarry angrily left the room after the decision was announced. Asked to comment on the decision, he said: "That's typical of the athletic commission.
SPORTS
August 18, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY
Jerry Quarry appeared at the California Athletic Commission meeting in Sacramento Friday, asking for a boxing license. The commission did not turn the 45-year-old heavyweight down, but it didn't give him what he sought, either. Quarry, who wanted to appear in a Sept. 15 sparring exhibition with former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes in Ontario, was instead issued a sparring permit. His proposed exhibition with Holmes would have been for five rounds, with 16-ounce gloves and headgear.
SPORTS
July 28, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY
Once, they were a team. They shared gym time, fighting time, happy time . . . and then there were unhappy times. In the 1950s, Johnny Flores ran a little gym in Pacoima, where he taught kids how to box. Guys like Flores dreamed of the day when a future champion would walk through the door and ask: "Mister, could you teach me how to box?" Jerry Quarry was never a champion, but he came close.
SPORTS
May 31, 1990 | LARRY STEWART
Jerry Quarry's right eye was apparently cut by a punch from fight promoter John Ellis, not by a kitchen cabinet door, as was reported Wednesday. Ellis planned to stage a fight between Quarry, 45, and a journeyman named Paul Bradshaw in Lake Geneva, Wis., June 9. According to Billy Gray, Quarry's adviser, and other sources, a dispute erupted Monday between Quarry's trainer, Guy Ditmars, and Ellis. Ditmars reportedly was upset that Ellis had given Quarry's sparring partners the day off.
SPORTS
September 22, 1990 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Athletic Commission voted unanimously Friday to deny former heavyweight contender Jerry Quarry a boxing license. Quarry, 45, must wait a year before reapplying. If Quarry, who has not fought in seven years, had been granted a license, he would have tried to arrange a bout against former heavyweight champion George Foreman, 42. Quarry angrily left the room after the decision was announced. Asked to comment on the decision, he said: "That's typical of the athletic commission.
SPORTS
July 25, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY
Jerry Quarry, 45, a heavyweight contender in the 1960s, has applied for a California boxing license, and it is expected that former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes, 40, will soon do the same. Promoter Paul Konapelsky wants to match the two Aug. 30 in Ontario. Quarry, who fought heavyweight champions Floyd Patterson, Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, has completed his license application and passed the neurological examination required of California boxers. Holmes has not applied.
SPORTS
May 31, 1990 | LARRY STEWART
Jerry Quarry's right eye was apparently cut by a punch from fight promoter John Ellis, not by a kitchen cabinet door, as was reported Wednesday. Ellis planned to stage a fight between Quarry, 45, and a journeyman named Paul Bradshaw in Lake Geneva, Wis., June 9. According to Billy Gray, Quarry's adviser, and other sources, a dispute erupted Monday between Quarry's trainer, Guy Ditmars, and Ellis. Ditmars reportedly was upset that Ellis had given Quarry's sparring partners the day off.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|