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Jerry Quickley

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2007 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
A more accurate title for the new show "Jerry Quickley: Un-Embedded" might be "Jerry Quickley: Unfinished." This one-man dispatch from the front lines of Iraq feels more like a half-realized podcast than a full-fledged theatrical endeavor. Perhaps best known as a host on KPFK-FM, Jerry Quickley recounts his recent trips to Baghdad in an extended monologue that he occasionally punctuates with photographs and video he took along the streets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2007 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
A more accurate title for the new show "Jerry Quickley: Un-Embedded" might be "Jerry Quickley: Unfinished." This one-man dispatch from the front lines of Iraq feels more like a half-realized podcast than a full-fledged theatrical endeavor. Perhaps best known as a host on KPFK-FM, Jerry Quickley recounts his recent trips to Baghdad in an extended monologue that he occasionally punctuates with photographs and video he took along the streets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2006 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
At 6 feet 5 inches and 360 pounds, Jerry Quickley would stand out in a crowd -- even without the finger-in-the-socket Afro. Gripping a tall iced coffee in one hand, cellphone in the other, this Wall Street executive-turned-poetry-slam-performer-turned-war correspondent carries himself with the affable panache of a guy who can talk his way into and out of pretty much anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2006 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
At 6 feet 5 inches and 360 pounds, Jerry Quickley would stand out in a crowd -- even without the finger-in-the-socket Afro. Gripping a tall iced coffee in one hand, cellphone in the other, this Wall Street executive-turned-poetry-slam-performer-turned-war correspondent carries himself with the affable panache of a guy who can talk his way into and out of pretty much anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to the Times
A poet and performer with only a year's experience in radio, Jerry Quickley might seem an unlikely candidate for war correspondent. But the host on the left-leaning KPFK-FM (90.7) said he went to Iraq -- until deported on the second day of the conflict -- to cover what he called the most significant news story since the Vietnam War. Quickley, a garrulous bear of a man heard on "Beneath the Surface," a news analysis show that airs weekdays from 5 to 6 p.m.
NEWS
November 29, 2007
KPFK programming: The radio highlights in Wednesday's Calendar section listed Jon Wiener as host of "Beneath the Surface" on KPFK-FM (90.7). That program is hosted by Jerry Quickley. It also misspelled Wiener's name as John Weiner. Wiener is host of "The Four O'Clock Report," airing Wednesdays at 4 p.m. on KPFK.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2001 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Regardless of how legend would have it, music and radical politics are not always an easy mix--one ingredient often tends to eclipse the other. But Sunday's concert at the El Rey Theatre protesting police brutality was a mostly memorable night of hip-hop, pop and jazz. Hosted by the Artists Network of Refuse & Resist, the show was the first of two nights at the venue and was headlined by the festive, multilayered hip-hop of Northern California's Blackalicious.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2001 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the conviction and fire of artists steeped in '60s-era black consciousness, New York's the Last Poets and L.A. wordsmith Kamau Daaood assessed the state of African American culture on Thursday at the El Rey Theatre. Their performances illuminated the roots of hip-hop, reminding us that the beat--and the Benjamins--aren't all that matters.
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | Kevin Bronson
Leaving the Best behind Six months after the release of a promising second album, the indie rock band Sunday's Best has lost its drummer. Tom Ackerman, who with Edward Reyes co-wrote the lyrics on "The Californian," has moved on, saying the band was mired in an "inertial second gear," but wishing the new lineup -- now including Gabriel Gamboa -- the best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2001
Mexican-born Ramon Novarro was the original Latin Lover, a romantic leading man whose popularity was rivaled only by Rudolph Valentino and John Gilbert. The high point of the Silent Movie Theatre's monthlong tribute to Novarro is tonight's screening of "Ben-Hur" (1925). Novarro plays the title character, the Jew who avenges the destruction of his family by Messala (Francis X. Bushman). The MGM movie was one of the grandest epics of its day, boasting "a cast of 125,000!"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to the Times
A poet and performer with only a year's experience in radio, Jerry Quickley might seem an unlikely candidate for war correspondent. But the host on the left-leaning KPFK-FM (90.7) said he went to Iraq -- until deported on the second day of the conflict -- to cover what he called the most significant news story since the Vietnam War. Quickley, a garrulous bear of a man heard on "Beneath the Surface," a news analysis show that airs weekdays from 5 to 6 p.m.
NEWS
January 17, 2002
8pm Theater In "Fiddler on the Roof," a humble milkman struggles to preserve his family traditions as 20th century pogroms loom. This new touring production of the landmark Joseph Stein-Jerry Bock-Sheldon Harnick musical is something of a tradition for star Theodore Bikel too: He has performed the role more than 1,600 times. Director Sammy Dallas Bayes has re-created Jerome Robbins' original Broadway choreography for the show. "Fiddler on the Roof," Wilshire Theater, 8440 Wilshire Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
If all art aspires to the condition of music, as Walter Pater famously said, few artists succeed as hypnotically as Roger Guenveur Smith in transforming themselves into spoken jazz. "The Watts Towers Project," Smith's deeply personal meditation on those sculptural spires dotting 107th Street, is unquestionably the high point of "Solomania!," the festival of four one-person performance works that opened last weekend at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. Appropriately enough, L.A.
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