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Jerry Reinsdorf

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November 23, 1996
In its story about Albert Belle signing for $50 million, The Times found it "ironic" that Jerry Reinsdorf, leader of the group opposing the labor agreement, would show such fiscal exaggeration. I think the more appropriate term is "hypocrite"--that is, one who pretends to be something he is not. Or, in normal terms, a liar. KEN MARCUS Los Angeles
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December 18, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Reporting From Chicago Down memory lane ? Two .500 seasons don't lead to banner headlines or special sections, but there was a fairly substantial media turnout for former Bulls coach Vinny Del Negro's first game back at United Center. The Clippers coach held court in front of the notepads and TV cameras before Saturday's game. Chicago went 41-41 in both of his seasons here and he was fired in May. "I'm very proud of what we accomplished here in two years," said Del Negro, who led the Bulls to two playoff berths, both losses in the first round.
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SPORTS
May 25, 1996 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welcome to the city of Big Shoulders and Cheap Owners, where Papa Bear has been succeeded by Son-in-Law Bear; where the eccentric chewing gum magnate who turned the Cubs into a synonym for "suffering" has been replaced by a newspaper with no upturn in sight; where the boss Blackhawk's name is cursed by fans listening to sold-out hockey games on radio because he won't televise them. Let's face it, it shouldn't be hard to be the most popular owner in this town.
SPORTS
December 13, 2009 | Mark Heisler
Rumors blowing in the Windy City Storm clouds began to gather above the head of Chicago Coach Vinny Del Negro after the Bulls' 110-78 home loss to Toronto, which had lost five of six, giving up 117 points a game. "The last time I remember the Bulls losing like this at home . . . was also on a Saturday night," wrote Sam Smith , "just about two years ago when the Houston Rockets dominated an indifferent Bulls team. "Two days later Coach Scott Skiles was fired.
SPORTS
March 12, 1985
The federal prosecutor, Assistant U.S. Atty. Ernst Mueller, took three hours to give his closing argument in the 14-week-old racketeering case against former pitcher Denny McLain and three co-defendants. McLain is the only defendant charged on all counts: racketeering, conspiracy, extortion, possession of cocaine and plotting to smuggle cocaine. Utah Jazz President David Checketts said that the National Basketball Assn.
SPORTS
June 19, 1989 | From Times wire services
The owners of the Chicago Blackhawks and Chicago Bulls plan to blitz the Illinois General Assembly this week for help in building a hockey-basketball palace on Chicago's West Side. William Wirtz and Jerry Reinsdorf wanted to make their case three weeks ago, but were held up by Mayor Richard M. Daley, who wanted assurances that 70 families to be displaced by the new arena would be adequately compensated, The Chicago Tribune reported today. The $110-million arena would seat 22,000 people and accommodate 7,000 cars on a lot directly south of the current Chicago Stadium.
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October 6, 1985 | United Press International
Jerry Reinsdorf is thinking about his first full year with the Chicago Bulls, even though there are questions to be answered regarding his Chicago White Sox. Reinsdorf, who bought controlling interest in the NBA Bulls last winter, admitted recently he is looking forward to the upcoming basketball season. "I'm still on my honeymoon," he said. "Ask me (about his enthusiasm) in a couple of months." The Bulls haven't signed Charles Oakley of Virginia Union--the Cavaliers' No.
SPORTS
July 13, 1996 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For teams who thought they would never get past the Chicago Bulls, here's the good news: They're breaking up that old gang of theirs. In a surprise development, Michael Jordan Friday agreed to a one-year deal--for a whopping $30 million, according to the Chicago Tribune, the biggest single-season contract ever in American team sports--suggesting he may leave the Bulls next summer, or retire. So far, it has been a turbulent off-season for history's winningest team.
SPORTS
January 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Chicago Bull chairman Jerry Reinsdorf says he did not want to see Michael Jordan retire and the rest of the team split up any more than the city's fans did. But if it had to happen--and it did--he wanted them to leave as winners. "As a fan, you really have to like that Michael retired as the equivalent of the undefeated heavyweight champion of the world," Reinsdorf told the Chicago Tribune on Thursday.
SPORTS
April 23, 2003 | From Associated Press
Chicago White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf insists unruly fans are not limited to his team's ballpark, and tougher laws are the best way to keep spectators off the field. "This is not a White Sox problem, it's a problem at all facilities across the country that has to be addressed," Reinsdorf said Tuesday. These were his first public comments since a fan attacked an umpire last week at U.S. Cellular Field during a game against Kansas City.
SPORTS
January 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Chicago Bull chairman Jerry Reinsdorf says he did not want to see Michael Jordan retire and the rest of the team split up any more than the city's fans did. But if it had to happen--and it did--he wanted them to leave as winners. "As a fan, you really have to like that Michael retired as the equivalent of the undefeated heavyweight champion of the world," Reinsdorf told the Chicago Tribune on Thursday.
SPORTS
January 14, 1999 | J.A. ADANDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only coach Michael Jordan said he would play for refused to come back. He won't be blamed for the breakup of the Chicago Bulls. Jordan walked away from the team and off into the sunset. He won't be blamed for the breakup of the Chicago Bulls. It appears the only thing that will stay the same around here is the fans' tendency to find fault in everything that owner Jerry Reinsdorf and General Manager Jerry Krause do. Reinsdorf/Krause bashing has always been the companion activity to Jordan worship in this town.
SPORTS
March 23, 1998 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe, Jerry Reinsdorf says, he shouldn't have put it in the context of being crazy. Maybe it put too much of a negative connotation on it. On the other hand, the Chicago White Sox owner doesn't regret the July 31 trade last year that sent pitchers Wilson Alvarez, Roberto Hernandez and Danny Darwin to the San Francisco Giants for six young players. Reinsdorf says it didn't make the White Sox a poorer team and that his now infamous quote has not been reported accurately.
SPORTS
August 20, 1997 | SHAV GLICK
Jerry Reinsdorf, owner of the Chicago White Sox, has been severely criticized for saying, "Anyone who thinks we can catch the Indians is crazy," but old-timers point out that he isn't the first White Sox owner to make such a statement. "We don't have enough power to beat the Yankees," Bill Veeck said of the 1959 team at the time he bought it. That White Sox team won its first American League pennant in 40 years. But then, everybody always thought Veeck was crazy.
SPORTS
June 1, 1997 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last tango for the Bulls? Next-to-last tango? In the old days, your Yankee, Canadien and Celtic dynasties lived to prolong their reigns, but these are the Bulls, the one true modern successor to the old empires, and they like to live on the edge. On one side of the blade they're skating on is their fifth title in seven seasons. This might, but isn't guaranteed to, bring back Coach Phil Jackson, superstar Michael Jordan and superstar's helper, Scottie Pippen.
SPORTS
September 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Larry Himes will not return as general manager of the Chicago White Sox next season, the club announced Saturday. After two days of discussions, club chairman Jerry Reinsdorf said that "in everyone's best interest, the contract of Larry Himes will not be extended beyond the 1990 season." "Himes was not fired and he did not resign," Reinsdorf said. "I will not discuss the reasons as to what happened. But I know that Larry Himes will able to get another job in baseball."
SPORTS
August 1, 1994
President Clinton hopes there isn't a baseball strike, and Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf broke ranks Sunday by saying he would be willing to have an agreement without a salary cap. Clinton, at a Saturday night appearance in Cleveland, said he hoped there won't be a work stoppage but didn't say whether he would do anything about the threatened Aug. 12 strike by the Major League Baseball Players Assn.
SPORTS
December 5, 1996 | JIM MURRAY
In 1920, when Boston Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 (and a passel of loan guarantees), it was the most expensive deal in the history of baseball, but it was widely held to be an example of how stupid the grand old game had become fiscally. I mean, who was worth $125,000? Babe Ruth was, of course. He was more than a player, he was a god. He was a revolution. He changed the way the game was played forever.
SPORTS
November 27, 1996 | MIKE DOWNEY
Peace is at hand, Henry Kissinger would say, had he negotiated the baseball truce talks. Except for a dotted i here or a slashed $ there, an agreement has been forged between the workers and the bosses, so, on with the Show.
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