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Jerry Rothman

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August 9, 1997 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Rothman climbed atop his bird-like sculpture and rocked it. The demonstration may have looked like performance art, but it was more of a chemistry lesson. "If this were made of regular clay, firing would have made it shrink and crack on its steel armature," he said proudly. "This didn't." Rothman developed so-called ferro-ceramic some 24 years ago. The mix of clay and inorganic particles isn't exactly romantic or revolutionary-sounding in this high-tech era.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2003 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Fifty years' worth of Jerry Rothman's ceramic sculptures can't help but look like a group show. But unlike most multi-artist exhibitions, which cling to their themes like a tick, this two-part survey abandons uniformity. No attempt is made to sum up anything neatly. That suits the 70-year-old ceramist perfectly. The loose ends that abound in "Feat of Clay: Five Decades of Jerry Rothman" convey his unflinching conviction that when it comes to art, a loose cannon on deck can still hit the mark.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2003 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Fifty years' worth of Jerry Rothman's ceramic sculptures can't help but look like a group show. But unlike most multi-artist exhibitions, which cling to their themes like a tick, this two-part survey abandons uniformity. No attempt is made to sum up anything neatly. That suits the 70-year-old ceramist perfectly. The loose ends that abound in "Feat of Clay: Five Decades of Jerry Rothman" convey his unflinching conviction that when it comes to art, a loose cannon on deck can still hit the mark.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1997 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Rothman climbed atop his bird-like sculpture and rocked it. The demonstration may have looked like performance art, but it was more of a chemistry lesson. "If this were made of regular clay, firing would have made it shrink and crack on its steel armature," he said proudly. "This didn't." Rothman developed so-called ferro-ceramic some 24 years ago. The mix of clay and inorganic particles isn't exactly romantic or revolutionary-sounding in this high-tech era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
Mayor Steve Dicterow will dedicate three Heisler Park statues at 6 p.m. Oct. 7. The ceramic sculptures, donated by Kathleen Cummings and created by Laguna Beach artist Jerry Rothman, have been installed at entryways into the park. A reception will follow at the Laguna Art Museum, before the First Thursday Art Walk gallery tour. Information: (949) 497-0722.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1996 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition by rank-and-file members of the Laguna Art Museum could scuttle its proposal to merge with the Newport Harbor Art Museum of Newport Beach. Both museums' boards of trustees are expected to vote on a merger plan Tuesday. But unless the decision is ratified by Laguna members (supporters who contribute $35 or more to the museum annually are granted membership), the merger is dead in the water, according to highly placed sources at each institution.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1988 | From Associated Press
Platinum futures prices fell sharply Wednesday as the dollar gained strength ahead of today's report on the U.S. trade deficit, which many traders expected to show a lessening of the import-export gap. The dollar's advance against most foreign currencies also contributed to weakness in the other precious metals, analysts said. On other exchanges, soybean and grain prices fell; crude oil futures edged higher; livestock and meat were down, and stock index futures retreated.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An exhibit called "Paint Today," without further qualifiers, might seem ludicrously ambitious, conceived in overly broad strokes. It's easier to get a handle on "Clay Today," which opened last week at the Saddleback College Art Gallery in Mission Viejo. That's because, first, the show is limited to work produced in Orange County. And second, clay is hardly the most popular medium among artists today.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1992 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly for The Times
In the 1950s, some adventuresome potters decided that clay could make more than functional pots, pitchers, bowls and other vessels. Breaking from centuries-old traditions, they began the evolution of studio ceramics from purely utilitarian or decorative objects to sculptural forms that conveyed content. Abstract Expressionist theory, originally associated with painting, was applied to clay.
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