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Jerry Royster

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SPORTS
March 3, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Jerry Royster isn't sure whether to laugh or cry: The umps just don't speak his language. Every time he races out of the dugout to argue a play, he has to bring along an interpreter. Last year, the former Dodgers infielder took the helm of this city's wildly popular Lotte Giants, becoming Korea's first foreign manager. From opening day, he was a stranger in a strange baseball land.
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SPORTS
March 3, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Jerry Royster isn't sure whether to laugh or cry: The umps just don't speak his language. Every time he races out of the dugout to argue a play, he has to bring along an interpreter. Last year, the former Dodgers infielder took the helm of this city's wildly popular Lotte Giants, becoming Korea's first foreign manager. From opening day, he was a stranger in a strange baseball land.
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SPORTS
January 10, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Over the years, the role of the utility player has changed meaning for Jerry Royster. "Before, I thought a utility player was somebody who barely made the team," Royster said. "I think the media has made it a good role for me. You're getting a lot of Jerry Royster-type players now, which most teams like. There aren't that many guys who can play infield and outfield, especially in the same game." Royster, 32, is proof that utility players are made, not born.
SPORTS
October 15, 2005
Paul DePodesta: Thank you for coming. Please sit down. Did you have a pleasant trip? Dodger Manager Candidate: Yes. PD: Would you like some coffee? DMC: Yes. PD: I was once quoted as saying I'd take nine Milton Bradleys if I could get them. Do you agree with that statement? DMC: Yes. PD: We have many Latino players on our roster. Do you speak Spanish? DMC: Si. PD: Hee-Seop Choi's quite a ballplayer, isn't he?
SPORTS
January 4, 1985
Jerry Royster, free agent multi-position player for the Atlanta Braves for nine seasons, signed a two-year contract with San Diego Thursday.
SPORTS
July 28, 1992 | Associated Press
Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent appointed former players Jerry Royster and Dusty Baker to manage in the new October developmental league. . . . New York Met outfielder Bobby Bonilla's two-game suspension was upheld, which put the punishment into effect immediately. Bonilla was suspended for going after Chicago Cub pitcher Shawn Boskie in a game last month.
SPORTS
October 15, 2005
Paul DePodesta: Thank you for coming. Please sit down. Did you have a pleasant trip? Dodger Manager Candidate: Yes. PD: Would you like some coffee? DMC: Yes. PD: I was once quoted as saying I'd take nine Milton Bradleys if I could get them. Do you agree with that statement? DMC: Yes. PD: We have many Latino players on our roster. Do you speak Spanish? DMC: Si. PD: Hee-Seop Choi's quite a ballplayer, isn't he?
SPORTS
April 11, 1985 | DAVE DISTEL, Times Staff Writer
The Padres were a Swinging Singles Society before Jerry Royster broke up the party, such as it was, Wednesday afternoon. As it was, he also broke up the game. After 18 straight singles in the first two games of the season, the Padres finally got their first extra base hit when Royster doubled home two runs in the ninth inning. Pitcher Eric Show, who didn't really need much help, finally had some breathing room as the Padres beat the San Francisco Giants, 3-0.
SPORTS
April 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
Jerry Royster has a simple explanation for the Milwaukee Brewers' success since he replaced Davey Lopes as manager. The Brewers won their third in a row under Royster, defeating the St. Louis Cardinals, 5-3, Saturday at Milwaukee behind Alex Sanchez's tiebreaking single in the eighth inning. "The reason for the turnaround is that we were so bad, there was no place else to go," Royster said. "I can't be any more serious than that. We went two weeks with really not hitting."
SPORTS
September 29, 1985 | Associated Press
Atlanta Braves Manager Bobby Wine has seen it happen all too often this season. And he, for one, is tired of it. The Braves, 62-91 and trailing the National League West-leading Los Angeles Dodgers by 29 games, failed to take advantage of several opportunities Saturday night and lost, 6-5, in 13 innings to the Padres. "We played good enough to lose," Wine said. "We always seem to be getting behind and having to come back. The Padres gave us the breaks and we didn't use them.
SPORTS
April 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
Jerry Royster has a simple explanation for the Milwaukee Brewers' success since he replaced Davey Lopes as manager. The Brewers won their third in a row under Royster, defeating the St. Louis Cardinals, 5-3, Saturday at Milwaukee behind Alex Sanchez's tiebreaking single in the eighth inning. "The reason for the turnaround is that we were so bad, there was no place else to go," Royster said. "I can't be any more serious than that. We went two weeks with really not hitting."
SPORTS
July 28, 1992 | Associated Press
Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent appointed former players Jerry Royster and Dusty Baker to manage in the new October developmental league. . . . New York Met outfielder Bobby Bonilla's two-game suspension was upheld, which put the punishment into effect immediately. Bonilla was suspended for going after Chicago Cub pitcher Shawn Boskie in a game last month.
SPORTS
January 25, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Standing next to his BMW on Friday, Leon "Bip" Roberts sighed and said, "I'm just glad it's over." He had just signed his first Padre contract. Now, can he be first string? The Padres pray so. Although General Manager Jack McKeon says he should be able to make some deals during spring training, the team appears content with its one off-season move--drafting Roberts in December's minor league draft. They like his speed. (He had 40 stolen bases last year in the minors.) They like his toughness.
SPORTS
September 29, 1985 | Associated Press
Atlanta Braves Manager Bobby Wine has seen it happen all too often this season. And he, for one, is tired of it. The Braves, 62-91 and trailing the National League West-leading Los Angeles Dodgers by 29 games, failed to take advantage of several opportunities Saturday night and lost, 6-5, in 13 innings to the Padres. "We played good enough to lose," Wine said. "We always seem to be getting behind and having to come back. The Padres gave us the breaks and we didn't use them.
SPORTS
July 30, 1985 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Pictures don't lie, so Jerry Royster cannot deny the truth. During last August's brawl here between the Braves and Padres, Royster, then a Brave infielder, was right smack in the middle of it all. Smiling. Real toothy, too. Click. A photographer got him. Now, the picture hangs in the home of Tim Flannery, his current teammate with the Padres, and it has become a source of great laughter, not to mention great meaning. Royster, Mr.
SPORTS
April 11, 1985 | DAVE DISTEL, Times Staff Writer
The Padres were a Swinging Singles Society before Jerry Royster broke up the party, such as it was, Wednesday afternoon. As it was, he also broke up the game. After 18 straight singles in the first two games of the season, the Padres finally got their first extra base hit when Royster doubled home two runs in the ninth inning. Pitcher Eric Show, who didn't really need much help, finally had some breathing room as the Padres beat the San Francisco Giants, 3-0.
SPORTS
March 7, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Royster is an honest-looking man, the kind of guy you'd easily be tempted to buy something from. Yet throughout his baseball career, Royster has not been able to completely sell most people on himself. In the mid-70s he had hoped to be the Dodger third baseman, but Ron Cey already was there. He then became the Atlanta Braves third baseman, but Bob Horner appeared soon thereafter.
SPORTS
July 30, 1985 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Pictures don't lie, so Jerry Royster cannot deny the truth. During last August's brawl here between the Braves and Padres, Royster, then a Brave infielder, was right smack in the middle of it all. Smiling. Real toothy, too. Click. A photographer got him. Now, the picture hangs in the home of Tim Flannery, his current teammate with the Padres, and it has become a source of great laughter, not to mention great meaning. Royster, Mr.
SPORTS
March 7, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Royster is an honest-looking man, the kind of guy you'd easily be tempted to buy something from. Yet throughout his baseball career, Royster has not been able to completely sell most people on himself. In the mid-70s he had hoped to be the Dodger third baseman, but Ron Cey already was there. He then became the Atlanta Braves third baseman, but Bob Horner appeared soon thereafter.
SPORTS
January 10, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Over the years, the role of the utility player has changed meaning for Jerry Royster. "Before, I thought a utility player was somebody who barely made the team," Royster said. "I think the media has made it a good role for me. You're getting a lot of Jerry Royster-type players now, which most teams like. There aren't that many guys who can play infield and outfield, especially in the same game." Royster, 32, is proof that utility players are made, not born.
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