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Jerry Sanders

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NEWS
May 8, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Sanders, 42, a San Diego police officer for 20 years, was selected Friday to become chief of the city's 1,850-officer department. Sanders, an assistant chief for the past year, was selected by City Manager Jack McGrory, who said he was impressed by Sanders' command experience, his commitment to diversity in hiring and promotion, and his dedication to expanding neighborhood policing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
Polls indicate that a lot of Americans have changed their views on same-sex marriage in recent years. But in few cases was the change as public or consequential as that of Jerry Sanders. As mayor of San Diego, Sanders, a Republican and former police chief, risked his political career by supporting gay marriage. Sanders had opposed same-sex marriage when he ran for mayor in 2005. But he reversed his position in 2007 during his reelection campaign, saying that his previous opposition stemmed from prejudice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - On his last full day as mayor of San Diego, Jerry Sanders did something Sunday that took him back four decades. He rode with a police officer assigned to the 2 p.m. to midnight shift patrolling downtown. In the mid-1970s, fresh out of San Diego State, Sanders was a rookie officer assigned to that same beat. "I came in in a police car, I'm going out in a police car," Sanders, 62, had said with a laugh last week as he stood outside one of his signature achievements of his seven years as mayor: a new central library under construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - On his last full day as mayor of San Diego, Jerry Sanders did something Sunday that took him back four decades. He rode with a police officer assigned to the 2 p.m. to midnight shift patrolling downtown. In the mid-1970s, fresh out of San Diego State, Sanders was a rookie officer assigned to that same beat. "I came in in a police car, I'm going out in a police car," Sanders, 62, had said with a laugh last week as he stood outside one of his signature achievements of his seven years as mayor: a new central library under construction.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2004 | From Reuters
Jerry Sanders will step down in April as chairman of computer chip maker Advanced Micro Devices Inc., the company said. Hector Ruiz, a former Motorola Inc. executive who became AMD's chief executive in April 2002, will take on the additional title of chairman, the Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company said. Sanders, who co-founded AMD in 1969, intends to remain on the board of directors, the company said. From Reuters
BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Chairman Sought for Advanced Micro Devices: California's big state pension fund is seeking to unseat Jerry Sanders as chairman of Sunnyvale-based Advanced Micro Devices Inc., a pension fund spokesman said. The $70-billion California Public Employees Retirement System, known as CalPERS, has filed a shareholder resolution seeking an independent chairman, CalPERS general counsel Richard Koppes said.
OPINION
September 25, 2007
San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders showed impressive courage last week when he embraced the right of same-sex couples to marry. The Republican ex-cop had long said he believed civil unions were sufficient for gays, and he planned to veto his City Council's resolution backing a constitutional challenge to California's 2000 voter initiative making marriage possible only between a man and a woman. But he had a crisis of the heart when the resolution came to his desk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Sanders, a former police chief and favorite of this city's business establishment, was elected the city's next mayor, defeating Donna Frye, the self-described "surfer chick" who almost won the office last year. With nearly complete returns, Sanders had just over 54% of the vote, while Frye had roughly 45%. Sanders, 55, was a San Diego police officer for 20 years and police chief for six before retiring in 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
Polls indicate that a lot of Americans have changed their views on same-sex marriage in recent years. But in few cases was the change as public or consequential as that of Jerry Sanders. As mayor of San Diego, Sanders, a Republican and former police chief, risked his political career by supporting gay marriage. Sanders had opposed same-sex marriage when he ran for mayor in 2005. But he reversed his position in 2007 during his reelection campaign, saying that his previous opposition stemmed from prejudice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The subject at the mayoral debate was seals: whether the animals that have taken over part of the beach in La Jolla should be booted out so children can go swimming. Former Police Chief Jerry Sanders, leading in the polls after a well-funded, carefully crafted campaign, was cautious. Some people are pro-seals, some are pro-children, and the issue is snarled in litigation, he noted. "Let's let the court process go through," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO — City Councilman Carl DeMaio conceded defeat Wednesday to U.S. Rep. Bob Filner in the hard-fought race to succeed Mayor Jerry Sanders. DeMaio, 38, a conservative Republican, said he remains proud that he was a leader in the movement to reform the financial practices of city government, including curbing "runaway pension costs" and defeating a sales-tax increase. In unofficial returns, DeMaio trailed Filner, 70, a liberal Democrat, 52% to 48%. DeMaio told supporters that he had called Filner with congratulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Its official motto is "America's Finest City," but for the last decade this sunny municipality at the bottom of California has earned an unflattering reputation for fiscal foolishness. Those days may well be coming to an end, however. On Wednesday, the city's first "strong" mayor, Jerry Sanders, reported that San Diego was looking at a balanced budget for next year and a $119-million surplus over the next five. "We seem to be miles ahead of other cities," Sanders told reporters at a budget unveiling.
OPINION
September 25, 2007
San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders showed impressive courage last week when he embraced the right of same-sex couples to marry. The Republican ex-cop had long said he believed civil unions were sufficient for gays, and he planned to veto his City Council's resolution backing a constitutional challenge to California's 2000 voter initiative making marriage possible only between a man and a woman. But he had a crisis of the heart when the resolution came to his desk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Jerry Sanders on Thursday unveiled a 121-point plan to address the criticisms in a scathing report that blamed financial mismanagement for the city's $2-billion pension deficit. Sanders said that he "enthusiastically" accepts all the recommendations in a recent $20-million audit of the city's books by the New York-based risk management firm Kroll Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
More than any mayor this city has had in decades, Jerry Sanders is a work in progress. His modern predecessors -- from Pete Wilson in 1971 to Dick Murphy in 2000 -- all had been elected officials before becoming mayor. Their political styles and leanings were known. San Diego voters respect experience in their mayoral candidates. This is a military town. Nobody graduates from boot camp and becomes a general. Several business leaders have failed to become mayor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2006 | From Associated Press
Newly elected Mayor Jerry Sanders said Tuesday that he wanted the city's middle and top managers to submit their resignations this week as part of his plan to reorganize a "broken" city government. Sanders said the goal was to eliminate one-third of the management positions that weren't covered by union contracts. The city doesn't know how many of these jobs there are because of the lack of a centralized personnel system.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, it was pictures of his daughters that convinced Jerry Sanders to step down after 5 1/2 years in the 75-hour-a-week job as chief of police in the state's second-largest city. "I have some pictures of my daughters from when I was sworn in as chief," Sanders said last week in announcing his retirement. "They were little rascals. Now they're teenagers. I don't remember much in between."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
After a campaign filled with gloomy talk about the city's financial problems, San Diego voters will choose today between a former police chief and a City Council member who owns a surf shop to be the next mayor. Former Police Chief Jerry Sanders is leading in two public opinion polls, one done for the ABC TV affiliate, and another done by an independent pollster. Both polls also show that Councilwoman Donna Frye has gained ground in the campaign's final stretch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
On New Year's Day, government reforms approved by angry voters granted newly elected Mayor Jerry Sanders more authority than any mayor in the city's modern history. But then, he faces bigger problems than any previous mayor. Consider: a $2-billion pension deficit, criminal corruption cases both underway and looming, and an internecine war between the city attorney and the rest of the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Former Police Chief Jerry Sanders was sworn in as mayor Monday and immediately offered an affable but gloomy assessment of the city's financial problems. "The news won't be good for some time," said the 55-year-old Republican. Sanders beat Councilwoman Donna Frye last month to assume the final three years of the term of Dick Murphy, who resigned in July amid criticism stemming from the city's $2-billion pension deficit and other problems. On Jan.
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