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SPORTS
February 19, 1990
Jerry Schemmel, deputy commissioner and general legal counsel for the Continental Basketball Assn., announced his resignation effective March 15. Schemmel, 30, served as acting commissioner for five months after the death of Jay Ramsdell, who was killed in a plane crash in Sioux City, Iowa, in July. Schemmel also was a passenger on the flight but escaped serious injury.
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SPORTS
February 19, 1990
Jerry Schemmel, deputy commissioner and general legal counsel for the Continental Basketball Assn., announced his resignation effective March 15. Schemmel, 30, served as acting commissioner for five months after the death of Jay Ramsdell, who was killed in a plane crash in Sioux City, Iowa, in July. Schemmel also was a passenger on the flight but escaped serious injury.
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SPORTS
July 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Owners of the 16 teams in the Continental Basketball Assn. decided today to continue with the scheduled two-day draft, even though the plane crash in Sioux City, Iowa, has cast a pall over the activities. Commissioner Jay Ramsdel, 25, and his deputy commissioner, Jerry Schemmel, were flying from the league's headquarters in Denver to Columbus aboard the United DC-10 that crashed Wednesday in Iowa. Schemmel was listed as one of the survivors, but Ramsdel was still missing as of this afternoon.
SPORTS
July 21, 1989 | Associated Press
The commissioner of the Continental Basketball Assn. is among those missing and presumed dead in the crash of a United Airlines DC-10, another league official said Thursday. Commissioner Jay Ramsdell, 25, and deputy commissioner Jerry Schemmel, 29, were on their way from Denver, Colo., to Columbus, Ohio, for the league's annual player draft when the jumbo jet crashed at the Sioux Gateway Airport as the pilot tried to make an emergency landing Wednesday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | Stacy Jenel Smith \f7
The heroic rescue of a baby aboard United Airlines Flight 232--which crashed on the runway of the airport in Sioux City, Iowa, in July--has captured the interest of Hollywood. Jerry Schemmel, the passenger who pulled the infant from the wreckage, is currently in discussion with I.T.C. Productions regarding rights to his part of the story. "Sure, I'm considering it," he told us from his Denver office. Not so United Airlines.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Here are the names of surviving passengers and crew of the crash of a United Airlines DC-10 near Sioux City, Iowa. The names were provided by United; ages and hometowns were gathered from a variety of sources. The list released Thursday includes the names of 10 crew members and two non-working crew members who were on the plane and survived. One flight attendant was missing and not identified. Crew: Capt. Alfred C. Haynes, Seattle First Officer W. R. Records Second Officer D. J.
SPORTS
August 3, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY
"Run!" he told the children. "Run through the cornfield!" They were 12 and 9 and they were scared. Melissa Roth squeezed her kid brother Todd's hand and they did what the man said. They ran. They ran as fast and as far as they could. Neither knew what had become of their older brother Jody, 14. They obeyed the man and ran screaming through the field of Iowa corn. Todd cut himself on a stalk. Michael Matz ran back into the burning airplane. He shielded his eyes. He stepped over bodies.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | PENELOPE McMILLAN and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writers
Jerry Schemmel had escaped the burning United Airlines DC-10 after it crashed here Wednesday and found safety in a cornfield. But he heard the cries of a baby coming from the smoking wreckage and he plunged back into the airplane. "I found her--a baby girl--in an overhead compartment, beneath a bunch of stuff, and pulled her out," Schemmel, 29, said after he had been examined and released from a Sioux City hospital. "By that time it (the plane) was filled with smoke and I just ran with her.
SPORTS
April 14, 1990 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Otto and a few hundred other fans are sitting on wooden bleachers before a Continental Basketball Assn. game between the hometown Islanders and the Rapid City (S.D.) Thrillers. A dozen future Laker Girls--dolled-up 10-year-olds wearing lipstick and leotards--finish their pregame routine. It's tipoff time, and Otto gets ready for the action to begin--off the court. "I don't see him," Otto says, scanning the gym from her courtside seat.
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